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makin' bacon

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  • makin' bacon

    Does anyone know why some bacon comes out all cripsy and brown, and shrivelled...

    And why mine this morning was sort of watery...? When I fried it up in the pan it was almost boiling in it's own juice, as opposed to frying - and it didn't go brown at all. The good thing is - it stayed nice and big and fat shaped and didn't shrivel.

    Is it a different cut of bacon?
    SW: 68 kg. * CW: 61.5 kg. * GW: 60 kg or less...
    “Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” ~ Buddha

  • #2
    Some bacons have extra water in them, especially low quality bacon.

    Your best way to make pan fried bacon is let it cook for a long time on low-med-low heat. Like rendering fat for tallow. Or you can throw it in the oven at 400.

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    • #3
      It also depends on how crowded the pan is. If you're cooking too many pieces at once, there isn't as much space for the water to evaporate, resulting in partially steamed, soggy bacon. I try to put enough pieces in the pan to keep 1/4" between them. Too little bacon in the pan also makes for uneven cooking because there isn't enough fat to go around to functionally "shallow fry" the bacon.

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      • #4
        Ah, OK, that makes sense Omelette - my pan was extrememly crowded! I'll try less next time. Thanks.

        I don't have an oven Dualhammers. All I have is just one convection 'ring' - unfortunately most kitchens in Asia don't do 'ovens' - so it means I have to boil or fry everything - one thing at a time! Not ideal
        SW: 68 kg. * CW: 61.5 kg. * GW: 60 kg or less...
        “Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.” ~ Buddha

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        • #5
          Dry Curing

          This is the oldest method and each farmhouse would have its own recipe and a slab of bacon would be kept in the inglenook above the fireplace. From Saxon times pigs were fattened in oak forests on mast (acorns) during Autumn and cured to provide meat for the family in winter months. Bacon formed part of the rations for long distance sea journeys, heavy salting preserved the meat from spoiling, but by the time it reached the Americas it was tough and more like boot leather than bacon as we know it today.

          Wet Curing

          The term ‘Wet-cure’ means to immerse in a liquid brine (a salt and saltpetre solution containing useful salt tolerant bacteria) for 3 to 4 days. This is a much milder form of curing, and the meat is cured in the brine under refrigeration. As meat keeps fresh longer at lower temperatures it does not require so much salt. The Wiltshire Cure (Wet-cure) was developed by the Harris family of Calne, Wiltshire in the United Kingdom, and was revolutionary in its time (1840’s). As there were no refrigerators in those days, they used to pack the roof with winter ice to lower the temperature

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