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  • Ground beef - anyone else hate it?

    I am a former vegetarian, trying hard to expand my protein choices. Ground beef is by far the most affordable grass-fed option for me. I have tried cooking it my different ways and each time I end up feeling like I'm eating dog food and actually feeding the leftovers to my dogs. I thought I just needed to get used to eating beef since it had been so long before I went Primal, but I think I just hate it the whole idea of it. Have I just not found the best way to make it, or what? I'm really bummed b/c I can't really afford any other cuts of grass-fed beef.

  • #2
    It sounds like it is a texture thing mostly?

    How about a big roast. Round roast or chuck roast? I can usually get grass fed chuck roast for <$5 /lb. And there is very very little waste with a good roast so every ounce counts as food. I like mine as a rare roast but I understand that pink meat is sometimes hard for the former vegetarians. (or as my friend puts it "I like the taste of rare steak but I have to eat it in the dark")

    Or how about stew meat? That is usually REALLY cheap. Make a good hearty veggie laden beef mushroom stew.

    How are you trying to make it? We use several meals a week with ground beef as the kiddos like it. Tacos (for me a taco salad) and meat spaghetti sauce (for me ...pour it hot over a plate piled high with baby spinach and stir until the spinach wilts...sometimes I nuke it a tiny bit more if i want a bit wiltier. ) Hamburgers of course....and while I like a rare steak, I do cook my burgers more.
    MTA: because it is rare I dont have more to say

    "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - my daughter Age 7

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    • #3
      Some days I'll eat a KG of it.
      It tends to loose it's luster after a short period unless you get creative.

      Like mixing it with plenty of paprika, garlic, shredded cheese and making paddies out of it, or turning it into a giant pot of chili.

      If you could stand eating tofu, lentils and veg, you'll get over it eventually.

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      • #4
        Ground Beef is like my life saver. Dump it in a skillet and mix it with cheese, spices, lots of cumin, and some cheese and HOLY CRAP IT IS TACO NIGHT. Throw it in a pan with some sauteed peppers and sriracha sauce and HOLY CRAP IT COCK SAUCE NIGHT. Throw it in a pan and then crack a bunch of eggs in it and HOLY CRAP ITS A MEAT FRITATTA WITH A LITTLE BIT OF EGG IN IT.

        Dang I love me some ground beef, it's so versatile. Try some experimentation and learn to love the beef!

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        • #5
          If you eat tomatoes then turn it into a bolognaise or spaghetti sauce. Tomato has a strong flavour and will help to cover up the taste. Although it sounds like the texture may be a problem from you as well.

          EDIT: You can also make chilli.
          A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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          • #6
            Originally posted by runnergal View Post
            It sounds like it is a texture thing mostly?

            How about a big roast. Round roast or chuck roast? I can usually get grass fed chuck roast for <$5 /lb. And there is very very little waste with a good roast so every ounce counts as food. I like mine as a rare roast but I understand that pink meat is sometimes hard for the former vegetarians. (or as my friend puts it "I like the taste of rare steak but I have to eat it in the dark")

            Or how about stew meat? That is usually REALLY cheap. Make a good hearty veggie laden beef mushroom stew.

            How are you trying to make it? We use several meals a week with ground beef as the kiddos like it. Tacos (for me a taco salad) and meat spaghetti sauce (for me ...pour it hot over a plate piled high with baby spinach and stir until the spinach wilts...sometimes I nuke it a tiny bit more if i want a bit wiltier. ) Hamburgers of course....and while I like a rare steak, I do cook my burgers more.
            Funny you should mention roast and stew meat, I have both in my freezer waiting to be cooked... those were the only grass-fed options I could afford. But, grass-fed ground beef is still at least $2/lb cheaper than either of those. Do you have a good recipe for chuck roast?

            As for ground beef, I have tried making taco meat, mixing with various veggies, making burgers, etc. I have not tried chili, but I worry that I really will not like that since it is pretty much straight ground beef? It is mostly the smell, it just smells like dog food to me The texture is not as much of a problem. And I guess mentally, knowing that it is ground up who-knows-what-part-of-how-many-different-cows. I'm not giving up, but would love some great recipes if anyone has any!

            Thanks for the responses!!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by paradisefound View Post
              Funny you should mention roast and stew meat, I have both in my freezer waiting to be cooked... those were the only grass-fed options I could afford. But, grass-fed ground beef is still at least $2/lb cheaper than either of those. Do you have a good recipe for chuck roast?

              As for ground beef, I have tried making taco meat, mixing with various veggies, making burgers, etc. I have not tried chili, but I worry that I really will not like that since it is pretty much straight ground beef? It is mostly the smell, it just smells like dog food to me The texture is not as much of a problem. And I guess mentally, knowing that it is ground up who-knows-what-part-of-how-many-different-cows. I'm not giving up, but would love some great recipes if anyone has any!

              Thanks for the responses!!
              I would encourage you to find a local grassfed rancher. Then you can be assured that at least the ground beef is all from one cow. I like casseroles with onions, potatoes, and spices. Burgers are also good. With grassfed ground beef and steaks, it's very important not to overcook it. Beyond medium is too much. I actually cook steaks rare and burgers medium rare. Rare might be something to work up to, especially from a vegetarian background.

              Here is how I've been cooking my chuck roasts lately: let the roast sit out at room temp for a little while. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees F. Warm up a roasting pan or dutch oven over medium heat and add a couple tablespoons of coconut oil, bacon grease, or ghee. Lightly salt and pepper both sides of the roast. Once the pan is good and warm, brown the roast on each side, about 4-5 minutes. Meanwhile, chop up a medium sized onion. When the roast is brown, set it aside on a plate and brown the onions in the drippings. Add the roast back in, and cover it up halfway with liquid. I usually use a little carrot/celery/spinach juice that I keep on hand for healing properties. I think the celery has some enzymes that help break down the connective tissue. This should account for maybe 1/4 cup of the liquid if you go this route. For the rest of the liquid I just use filtered water, but you could use stock or wine. Add in herbs and spices to your liking (Italian seasoning is good) and more salt and pepper. Cover and bring it back to a boil over medium heat. Once it boils, put it in the oven for about 4 hours. If you don't have a tightly sealing lid, check it occasionally to ensure there is still plenty of liquid. Mine is maintenance-free in an enameled cast iron dutch oven. When it's done, it will resist a fork very little. In fact, I usually tear it apart with two forks.

              Low and slow is truly the trick with grassfed roasts. Good luck and let me know how it turns out!
              Last edited by prib81; 05-02-2011, 11:18 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by prib81 View Post
                I would encourage you to find a local grassfed rancher. Then you can be assured that at least the ground beef is all from one cow. I like casseroles with onions, potatoes, and spices. Burgers are also good. With grassfed ground beef and steaks, it's very important not to overcook it. Beyond medium is too much. I actually cook steaks rare and burgers medium rare. Rare might be something to work up to, especially from a vegetarian background.

                Here is how I've been cooking my chuck roasts lately: let the roast sit out at room temp for a little while. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees F. Warm up a roasting pan or dutch oven over medium heat and add a couple tablespoons of coconut oil, bacon grease, or ghee. Lightly salt and pepper both sides of the roast. Once the pan is good and warm, brown the roast on each side, about 4-5 minutes. Meanwhile, chop up a medium sized onion. When the roast is brown, set it aside on a plate and brown the onions in the drippings. Add the roast back in, and cover it up halfway with liquid. I usually use a little carrot/celery/spinach juice that I keep on hand for healing properties. I think the celery has some enzymes that help break down the connective tissue. This should account for maybe 1/4 cup of the liquid if you go this route. For the rest of the liquid I just use filtered water, but you could use stock or wine. Add in herbs and spices to your liking (Italian seasoning is good) and more salt and pepper. Cover and bring it back to a boil over medium heat. Once it boils, put it in the oven for about 4 hours. When it's done, it will resist a fork very little. In fact, I usually tear it apart with two forks.

                Low and slow is truly the trick with grassfed. Good luck and let me know how it turns out!
                Oh, I would love to find a local grass-fed source, but unfortunately the last beef farm on this island just went out of business. It's really sad There are quite a few pastured beef producers on the Big Island of Hawaii but there is exactly ONE store here that carries their meat. Grass-fed is just not in high demand, I guess.

                Anyway, thanks so much for your roast recipe. I will try it this week and report back

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                • #9
                  Eat more fish, ah, the fish are healthy and will not lead to obesity.

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                  • #10
                    If it is just the smell you dont like,mix all your spices and oil in the bowl w/ the meat then make your patties or break up
                    then you are smelling the spices and herbs cook, much more appealing...
                    also if you are worring about what is in the meat, grind your own from roast for a while..until you get use to it add an egg and a little olive oil
                    or bacon grease it will be dry from not being ground with a fat...


                    Do you have a good recipe for chuck roast? My fav is...

                    place a roast and 2 or 3 sliced onions and agood low salt beef broth

                    bake 250 for about 8-10 hrs until it is falling apart

                    you can make many things from this I love it as a soup with cheese on to reminds me of french onion soup w/o croutons

                    cabbage rollups with sauce or lettace rollups

                    BBq

                    top of salads

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                    • #11
                      Yeah, I was gonna say, if I was in Hawaii I'd be eating fish and shellfish till it came out of my ears. SO hard to get good fish here.
                      Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

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                      • #12
                        I make roast beef, not pot roast (i.e. the kind you slice for sandwiches and stuff vs the falling apart meat)

                        Preheat oven to 500F. Line baking dish with foil and use a rack if you have one. Place roast on rack fat side up. I notice tmany grass fed roasts dont really have a fat side.

                        Soften ~ 1-2T of butter, bacon grease or refined coconut oil just enough that it is mashable with a fork. . Add 1-2T of seasoning. I like to use a jarred steak rub but any combo that is mostly salt and black pepper with maybe garlic or onion powder, paprika for color, etc. would be good. Make a paste of the fat and the seasoning and spread on the roast covering the top and down the sides.

                        If you have a meat thermometer that is oven safe to 500F go ahead and insert it so that you can see it through your oven window. The less you open your oven the better.

                        Roast @ 500 F for ~ 6 min per lb. I would not go below 14 minutes, I would not go longer than 25 regardless of the roast size. Turn oven down to 225F. DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN while the oven is cooling from 500-225. If you have not inserted the thermometer yet, after 90 minutes, go ahead and put it in and leave it in the rest of the time. Any meat thermometer that cant withstand 225 should be thrown out anyway! Most roasts I have done have taken about 2 1/2 hours after turning down. (The original recipe called for turning the oven OFF after the initial roast but that only works with a highly insulated old fashioned oven)

                        I usually aim for what i think is ~ 135-140. My thermometer is off by 10-15 degrees last I checked.

                        Remove and let sit for at least 5 minutes before slicing. Slice thinly on a diagonal. Be aware that many roasts come bound with butchers twine.

                        Roast beef:

                        Very rare 115–125 F (46–52 C) Blood-red meat, soft, slightly juicy
                        Rare 125–135 F (52–57 C) Red center, gray surface, soft, juicy
                        Medium rare 135–145 F (57–63 C) Dark Pink throughout, gray-brown surface, very juicy
                        Medium 145–155 F (63–68 C) Pink center, becomes gray-brown towards surface
                        Medium well 155–165 F (68–74 C) Thin line of pink, firm texture
                        Well done 165 F (74 C) Gray-brown throughout, tough texture, dry
                        Last edited by runnergal; 05-03-2011, 08:51 AM. Reason: cause I had copied from an email to some friends and some details were not relevant!
                        MTA: because it is rare I dont have more to say

                        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - my daughter Age 7

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                        • #13
                          I love ground beef and ground turkey. So versatile.
                          My name is Matt and I am a Beef Jerky Wizard.
                          www.greenlightjerky.com

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                          • #14
                            I, too, strongly dislike ground beef. I have slowly come down from "hate" to "strongly dislike." I am a steak lover, but I just don't like ground beef; and I also think it smells like dog food while it's cooking. (Disclosure - I am also a former vegetarian, but I've been a meat eater for quite a while now, and Primal for over a year).

                            I like ground bison better than beef, but your best bet is to use ground turkey for now. Ground turkey and ground beef can be treated almost identically while cooking - just add more seasoning for turkey than you would for beef, add some extra fat in the form of butter or EVOO, and worchestershire sauce can add back some "meatiness" to ground turkey.

                            I do recommend one recipe that absolutely transforms ground beef - Bolognese sauce by Anne Burrell. It's not your typical boiled-in-milk Bolognese, but a milk-free Tuscan version. Watch the video too, she is very specific about reduce, add liquid and reduce, repeat for hours and hours. We don't eat this over pasta, of course. You could eat it with spaghetti squash. I've tried using it as meat sauce in zucchini-eggplant noodle-less lasagne, but I'm still working on that one. However you eat it, it will be unlike any ground beef you have ever encountered before.
                            My blog, The Overflowing Pantry

                            Primal-esque since Feb 2010
                            100% Primal since May 2011 (again)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rivvin View Post
                              ground beef is like my life saver. Dump it in a skillet and mix it with cheese, spices, lots of cumin, and some cheese and holy crap it is taco night. Throw it in a pan with some sauteed peppers and sriracha sauce and holy crap it cock sauce night. Throw it in a pan and then crack a bunch of eggs in it and holy crap its a meat fritatta with a little bit of egg in it.

                              Dang i love me some ground beef, it's so versatile. Try some experimentation and learn to love the beef!
                              lololol!
                              Health is Wealth!

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