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Perfect Runny-Yolked Eggs!

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  • Perfect Runny-Yolked Eggs!

    On the weekends I've started making Rivvin's bread to have with runny-yolked eggs and thought I'd share this cooking method. I've always absolutely hated eggs that were crispy underneath and all greasy, so if you're like me, give this a try!

    Crack 2 eggs (or however many you like) into a small bowl.
    Melt one or two teaspoons of butter into a fry pan heated to a medium/high temp (6-7 on a scale of 1-10). Don't let the butter burn and don't have the pan too hot.
    Pour the eggs into the pan and immediately cover with a saucepan lid. Let cook for a minute or so, take off the lid and give the white a poke to see if it's done. If it's not done, put the lid on for another 30-60 seconds. Voila! Yummy runny-yolked eggs, similar to poached, but simpler!
    Newcomers: If you haven't read the book, at least read this thread ... and all the links!
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread17722.html

    F/49/5'4"
    Jan. 1, 2011: 186.6 lbs PBSW Mar. 1, 2011: 175.8 lbs
    CW: 146.8 lbs
    GW 140 lbs
    A proud member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals

  • #2
    Cool! I too have an aversion to the "crispy greasy" eggs. (I like that for other things, but not eggs) I have been poaching but that does require extra effort I'll give this a whirl Thanks

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    • #3
      I do my eggs much differently, yet achieve a runny yolk and firm white. I almost always cook a couple slices of bacon first - bacon should precede most activities. The bacon is cooked in a large cast iron skillet, over med-low heat. On my stove, I set the burner to three. This way, my bacon remains flat and crisps up beautifully without burning - and with no grease splatters. It does take just a bit longer, but I find plenty to do while it's cooking.

      Once my bacon is cooked, I bump up the heat to medium. The bacon is then removed to a paper towel to drain and the grease is drained to my Schmaltztasse (bacon grease cup), reserving 2-3 Tablespoons in the skillet. Making sure the bacon grease is not smoking, I crack each egg into the pan, and season with a tiny bit of salt, fresh cracked black pepper, and a pinch of thyme. I 'tidy' the edges of each egg by pushing any wandering white back toward the yolk - fresher eggs seem to have thinner whites. In about two to three minutes, the whites are beginning to set. At this point, I begin to ease my spatula under the white around the edges. Once I determine the whole egg will lift without tearing, I flip it over. Another two or so minutes to finish firming up the whites is generally all that is needed. Make sure the whites have cooked up after the flip, or the yolk will tear when you lift it out of the pan. This method allows the egg to cook fully without crisping any edges or creating a chewy white.

      The boyfriend loves how I prepare his eggs & bacon, and I've made a big fan of an avowed fried egg hater. Following the same approach as above, I crack both eggs into the pan, season as above, and then stir them together just a bit with a fork or spatula. The whites and yolks mix, but do not blend. The egg is cooked as above, but firm, with no runny yolk preserved. I often will season these with home-made cajun blackening spices, and grate parmesan cheese over it the instant it's off the heat, folding the eggs over to melt the cheese.

      This may not be as carefree a method as above, but it does not involve high heat, which I find I prefer. I get a lot of satisfaction out of plating up perfect eggs for the boyf on a sunday morning, or making eggs for the group when camping. And boy oh boy, do I get the kudos!

      (Speaking of eggs, my new favorite egg thing to do is skip the bacon and serve my eggs alongside a big dollop of liverwurst, mixing it all toegether as I eat it! Sautéed greens also go very well with runny-yolked eggs.)

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      • #4
        I cook mine much more similarly to your method, skookum. In my experience, heat above medium causes the whites to get crispy. I find that at too low of a heat however, the yolk begins to cook too much before the whites are done. It's a balancing act! I've actually considered cooking the yolks and white separately, but I'm afraid of breaking the yolks prematurely. Plus I like them cooked just slightly, where they are still very runny, but more viscous than if totally raw.

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        • #5
          That's where the pan lid comes in yodiewan. Keeps the heat in to cook the top of the egg white faster without keeping the egg in the pan long enough to burn the bottom.
          Newcomers: If you haven't read the book, at least read this thread ... and all the links!
          http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread17722.html

          F/49/5'4"
          Jan. 1, 2011: 186.6 lbs PBSW Mar. 1, 2011: 175.8 lbs
          CW: 146.8 lbs
          GW 140 lbs
          A proud member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals

          Comment


          • #6
            I also started using a lid recently. It does seem to help cook the tops, but maybe with my low-temp method the heat isn't high enough to cook them as much as I like before the yolk starts setting.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
              I cook mine much more similarly to your method, skookum. In my experience, heat above medium causes the whites to get crispy. I find that at too low of a heat however, the yolk begins to cook too much before the whites are done. It's a balancing act! I've actually considered cooking the yolks and white separately, but I'm afraid of breaking the yolks prematurely. Plus I like them cooked just slightly, where they are still very runny, but more viscous than if totally raw.
              My yolks are cooked ever so slightly by the time they come off the pan, but if the yolk is too thin, it won't stick to my bacon. I find it's very much a balancing act.

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              • #8
                My yolks are raw. I simply separate them from the whites, cook/fry the whites, and then have the yolks on top/at the side.

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                • #9
                  People who think it's easy to cook an egg haven't cooked many. Size, temperature of the egg and/or fat, all can make a difference in the end product. I usually poach eggs, but have used your method as well. It's finding these little tricks that make cooking fun.
                  This time, like all times, is a very good one, if we but know what to do with it. Ralph Waldo Emerson

                  Any given day you are surrounded by 10,000 idiots.
                  Lao Tsu, founder of Taoism

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                  • #10
                    I like my fried eggs over easy, but I often break the yolks when flipping them, so they end up getting a little overcooked for my liking. I'm going to try the lid method instead, thanks for the tip!

                    I absolutely love slow-cooked scrambled eggs, and they are fool-proof. Beat eggs with a dash of cream, salt, and, if you like them, a spoonful of capers. Heat your fat of choice in a saucepan over low heat and add the eggs. Now just leave them alone for a little while and don't be tempted to turn up the heat. Once they start to set, stir them gently every now and then. Just before they are done, when they are set but still moist, remove them from the heat and plate them up. I did that this weekend and had them with some smoked salmon-the eggs have an almost custard-like texture. It was so delicious!
                    My Primal Journal with lots of food pr0n

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                    • #11
                      I'm cutting back on dairy so right now I'm only having a tablespoon or two of cream with my berries after supper. Your eggs look and sound delicious though!
                      Newcomers: If you haven't read the book, at least read this thread ... and all the links!
                      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread17722.html

                      F/49/5'4"
                      Jan. 1, 2011: 186.6 lbs PBSW Mar. 1, 2011: 175.8 lbs
                      CW: 146.8 lbs
                      GW 140 lbs
                      A proud member of PETA: People Eating Tasty Animals

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        when the whites start to turn white I toss in a few tablespoons of water and put the lid on to steam them. Then peek and jiggle the pan to check for doneness, always works!
                        Cooking Primal with Otter - Journal
                        Otter's (Defunct) Primal Log
                        "Not baked goods, Professor, baked bads!" ~ The Tick

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