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Recipes with nori (seaweed)

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  • Recipes with nori (seaweed)

    Anybody else have packets of sushi nori that you keep meaning to snack on, but don't find appetizing when it comes down to it.......

    fried nori meat rolls!

    I am totally trying this for dinner!
    MisoHungry: Fried Nori Meat Rolls
    Cooking Primal with Otter - Journal
    Otter's (Defunct) Primal Log
    "Not baked goods, Professor, baked bads!" ~ The Tick

  • #2
    I have put it in salads too - just cut it into small squares first
    Karin

    A joyful heart is good medicine

    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose. - Jim Elliot

    Mmmmm. Real food is good.

    My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread29685.html

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    • #3
      Ooh! I haven't messed with nori yet, but found that wakume and kombu are *great* in chicken and mushroom soup (bone broth, celery, chicken, mushrooms, seaweed, spices). Wakume is also a good addition to meatloaf (beef, sausage, spinach, carrots, red bell pepper, spices).
      I was thinking nori might make a good lunch "wrap". What do you think? Is it very "seaweedy"? I can only picture it in the context of sushi, and can't remember it having much flavor on its own.
      “Falconry is not a hobby or an amusement; it is a rage. You eat and drink it, sleep it and think it. You tremble to write of it, even in recollection. It is as King James the First remarked, an extreme stirrer up of passions.” --T.H. White, The Godstone and the Blackymor

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      • #4
        I tried it as a wrap. It's so chewy that I practically squished all the innards out of it (tuna and avocado) in the process of ripping a piece off with my teeth. I guess that's why it's cut into bite-size pieces for sushi.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ottercat View Post

          fried nori meat rolls!

          I am totally trying this for dinner!
          MisoHungry: Fried Nori Meat Rolls
          Those sound really good, the filling looks like gyoza filling. I'm going to try these too, I have a package or two of nori in the cupboard right now that I'm not sure what to do with.
          My Primal Journal with lots of food pr0n

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          • #6
            Oooh, that looks delicious.

            I'm half-Japanese and grew up snacking on rice with teriyaki nori (not the kind that goes on sushi; that's usually unflavored and pretty boring on its own), but I will readily admit that Korean nori is the best nori of all. Salty, crispy, light... I eat it straight out of the package. I just need to find a brand that doesn't use terrible oils.

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            • #7
              You can buy the non-roasted sheets and roast them yourselves. Koreans use dark, fragrant sesame seed oil - is that Primal? You use a brush to brush on your oil on both sides of the sheet, then either cook it quickly over open flame on your gas stove, or use a hot non-stick pan. Add salt after roasting. I use scissors to but the sheets into four squares. They keep for a couple days in an airtight container.

              By the way, I'm half-Korean. This week I saw two license plates - one said HAPA-some number, and the other said HIP HAPA. Gah! I wish I had thought of that!
              Last edited by HillsideGina; 04-26-2011, 02:48 PM. Reason: Add the hapa stuff for Kaytoo.
              Positively Radical — Pigeonholes are for Pigeons!

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              • #8
                @Hillside
                the local Korean restaurant makes some awesome shredded nori that's fried and sprinkled with sesame seeds. I asked the waitress what it was called and she just said, "You're Japanese, so you like it!" and brought me more......

                I'll try the sesame seed oil thing. I liked that it got crunchy so it was easier to eat
                Cooking Primal with Otter - Journal
                Otter's (Defunct) Primal Log
                "Not baked goods, Professor, baked bads!" ~ The Tick

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by HillsideGina View Post
                  You can buy the non-roasted sheets and roast them yourselves. Koreans use dark, fragrant sesame seed oil - is that Primal? You use a brush to brush on your oil on both sides of the sheet, then either cook it quickly over open flame on your gas stove, or use a hot non-stick pan. Add salt after roasting. I use scissors to but the sheets into four squares. They keep for a couple days in an airtight container.

                  By the way, I'm half-Korean. This week I saw two license plates - one said HAPA-some number, and the other said HIP HAPA. Gah! I wish I had thought of that!
                  Yay, another hapa!

                  Sesame oil is on the "acceptable" list according to Mark; my problem is just that I'm not currently near any Asian markets, so I end up buying the stuff from Trader Joe's, etc., that uses a blend of sesame oil and soybean oil. I should try roasting my own; thanks for the idea!

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                  • #10
                    Geez, even my regular, small Ontario city supermarket has 2 varieties of pure sesame oil on the shelf, as well as the blended stuff. Either with the other oils, or in the Asian foods section. Surely Chicago supermarkets would be similarly well-endowed?

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                    • #11
                      Oh boy... I really need to get my hands on nori. Missed it terribly since coming home from Japan!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marthat View Post
                        Geez, even my regular, small Ontario city supermarket has 2 varieties of pure sesame oil on the shelf, as well as the blended stuff. Either with the other oils, or in the Asian foods section. Surely Chicago supermarkets would be similarly well-endowed?
                        Sorry, by "stuff" I meant nori, not the oil itself. I could definitely roast my own Primal nori; I just like the convenience of the packs.

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                        • #13
                          hapa haole here

                          Love the nori from trader joe's. Never thought of roasting my own will have to give it try with some coconut oil and Hawaiian salt
                          http://kitoikitchen.blogspot.com/

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                          • #14
                            Nori is so lovely and versatile. We are blessed with a raw food farmers market down in south Florida and you get a great selection of seaweeds.

                            Some other suggestions since I don't care for it out of the package..

                            -Nori Salt- 1 sheet of roasted Nori and 1 tbl. coarse sea salt, crumble nori into a spice grinder add salt and blend. Sprinkle anywhere you would use salt.
                            -Nor Sandwiches- lay down a piece of plastic or sushi mat with toasted nori on-top (make sure to use the filling side!). Get a 1/4 of hass avacado, mash and spread it on the nori like frosting. Thinly slice veggies of your choice and choose a meat (deli without nitrites or other junk, smoked salmon, canned fish, etc..) Lay meat on-top of avacado then make a row with your veggies roll and enjoy.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Aliayzar View Post
                              -Nori Salt- 1 sheet of roasted Nori and 1 tbl. coarse sea salt, crumble nori into a spice grinder add salt and blend. Sprinkle anywhere you would use salt.
                              Sounds like a simple furikake! Probably healthier than most, though. Even before I went Primal, I knew furikake was a problem condiment for me because I could eat a whole pot of fresh rice when I broke it out. My low-calorie compromise was putting it on kimchi. I should try that again, actually; it was pretty delicious.

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