Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Venison backstrap help

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Venison backstrap help

    How do you cook it? I have always dredged in flour and fried in canola oil, eek. I am thinking coconut flour (or no flour), and frying in tallow, and serving w/ a blueberry pan sauce instead of cream gravy, but I am wide open to suggestions! I also have plenty of bacon grease . . .

  • #2
    Here's what I like to do:
    1. Fill up my pan/skillet with about 3 or 4 TBS of tallow.
    2. Fry 1 onion (sliced) until just done with some salt and pepper to taste.
    3. Turn the heat up to high and cut the backstrap into little medallions about 3/4" thick and throw them in with the onions.
    4. Fry for just a minute or so on each side, keeping the venison nice and rare in the middle (the ONLY way game meat should be eaten) and finish with a little more salt and pepper to taste.


    Enjoy!

    Comment


    • #3
      send to me.

      Even if you fall flat on your face, at least you're moving forward!

      Comment


      • #4
        Honestly, the last time I had backstrap I cut it into little cubes, dipped it in tamari sauce, and ate it raw. Deer sashimi- lol

        Comment


        • #5
          I did mine with a very quick broil. Nothing but a little kosher salt.

          Comment


          • #6
            I've been cooking wild game for about 1o years now. The trick with game is the tender meat, the meat that is farthest away from the heat and feet, should be cooked hot and fast. The tougher meat (closest to the head and feet) should be cooked low and slow. How we cook backstrap; First we dried off the meat with a paper towel, dry meat gets a lovely sear. Then we sprinkle salt and pepper on it and sear it in a hot skillet, just a few minutes on each side. Sometimes we deglaze the skillet with a cup of red wine, after you pull out the backstrap. Let it simmer for a few minutes till reduced and pour over the meat. Always let your meat rest after cooking for about 5 minutes for maximum flavor. If you cook your tender cuts too long, the connective tissue, which is abundant in wild meat, will contract and give you a tough liver tasting meat. Good luck!
            Here is a post I did on it.
            Paul’s supreme venison sausage The Go Lightly Gourmet
            http://cavewomancafe.wordpress.com/sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks everyone! I cooked it in tallow for about 90 seconds on each side, served w/ onions and mushrooms, it was great and still plenty rare in the middle! When I was making it, I was thinking about eating it raw Diana, and I just couldn't stomach the thought! Not as culinarily adventurous as I thought, I maybe could have eaten it that way if someone served it to me . jrherring, that venison already flew from TX to CA with my dad, I think if I sent it back - it would be the most energy intensive venison ever eaten.

              Comment


              • #8
                Glad to hear it turned out well.
                Another suggestion for future reference (as I missed the post originally)...
                Marinate your venison in a little olive oil and Montreal steak seasoning (some off brands call it Canadian steak seasoning). Then grill til rare.
                The seasoning is a coarse blend of all kinds of stuff (salt, pepper, coriander, etc) and goes reall well with any red meat.
                Your goals, minus your doubts, equals your reality.
                - Ralph Marston

                Comment


                • #9
                  Looks like you already made it; however here is how I cook mine.

                  Cut into one inch cubes and marinade in cider vinegar and BBQ sauce. Wrap each cube with a piece of bacon and use a tooth pick to hold together. Grill until done.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by shrona View Post
                    Thanks everyone! I cooked it in tallow for about 90 seconds on each side, served w/ onions and mushrooms, it was great and still plenty rare in the middle! When I was making it, I was thinking about eating it raw Diana, and I just couldn't stomach the thought! Not as culinarily adventurous as I thought, I maybe could have eaten it that way if someone served it to me . jrherring, that venison already flew from TX to CA with my dad, I think if I sent it back - it would be the most energy intensive venison ever eaten.
                    tell your dad to hook me up next time he's here...!

                    glad you enjoyed it! i grew up eating venison battered, fried, and occasionally roasted. sometimes sausaged. i would love to get some more.
                    Even if you fall flat on your face, at least you're moving forward!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      for future reference, using juniper berries instead of blueberries for a sauce might be tasty. I don't know how available they are to you, but they complement venison well.

                      [Think I may have to pick up some venison this weekend... suddenly have a craving for it now!!]

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X