Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Creme Fraise fail, but 18% yogurt pass with flying colours!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Creme Fraise fail, but 18% yogurt pass with flying colours!

    So last week, I decided to try to make my own creme fresh <sp>. I left the last dollop in the container, heated the oven up to 110F, turned it off and the oven light on. I filled the empty'ish container with cream, gave it a stir, and left it in the oven over night.

    In the morning, sadness. I had this weird, lumpy... weirdness.

    Fast forward.

    Last night, late, I look into my yogurt container and realize its basically empty. Crud. However, it lists active bacterial culture. So I heated the oven to 110F, turned it off, and left the oven light on over night. Filled the container with 18% cream, gave it a stir, left it in the oven overnight.

    This morning, I got up to amazingly silky smooth yogurt! Unfortunately it was warm, and I'm just not fond of warm yogurt, so in the fridge it went. Tonight, making dinner, I realized I was out of some ingredients so figured what the hey, I'll use that yogurt to make a sauce.

    It is amazing. Its thick, a spoon stands up in it, it doesn't pour or even jiggle when shaken. Its creamy, its smooth, it tastes delicious. And its 18% cream based. MMMMMmmmmmmmm!

    A local Mennonite told me about the oven light thing, it keeps the oven at the perfect temperature overnight for yogurt, as long as you pre-heat the oven and then leave just the light on with the oven off.

    I know how I'm going to keep making yogurt!
    Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

    Big Fat Fiasco

    Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

  • #2
    Creme fraiche is cultured at room temperature. I heated mine to 110 then left it on the counter for 24 hours.

    I also recently found out that you cannit make creme fraiche with ultrapasteurized cream.
    Last edited by Adrianag; 03-01-2011, 10:04 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Unfort I'm in Canada, and its winter, and I have not alot of spare money. So, my house goes down to just below 60F during the day, and a little lower through the night - I only have the heat on first thing in the morning, and for about 3 hours in the evening, and then it goes up to not quite 70F. Not quite warm enough for counter culturing :\

      The turned off oven with just the light on worked perfectly though. The 18% yogurt is so thick I can stand a spoon up in it, and it tastes amazing.
      Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

      Big Fat Fiasco

      Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

      Comment


      • #4
        Is 18% what we call Half and Half in the US?

        Comment


        • #5
          Its the step below whipping cream, I think its above half and half. Light table cream maybe?
          Fighting fibromyalgia and chronic myofascial pain since 2002.

          Big Fat Fiasco

          Our bodies crave real food. We remain hungry as long as we refuse to eat real food, no matter how much junk we stuff into our stomachs. ~J. Stanton

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ElaineC View Post
            Its the step below whipping cream, I think its above half and half. Light table cream maybe?
            You are right:
            Half-and-Half
            Is a mixture of half cream and half milk. The milk fat content is about 10 percent. This cream cannot be whipped.

            Heavy Cream
            Has the highest amount of milk fat, which is usually between 36 and 40 percent in the United States and as high as 48 percent elsewhere. In the U.S., this cream is mostly found in gourmet food stores. If you can get this, it makes the richest whipped cream.

            Light Cream
            Is used more for a pouring cream, like into coffee and onto fruits. This cream has about 18 percent milk fat.
            Last edited by Adrianag; 03-02-2011, 06:26 PM.

            Comment

            Working...
            X