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Hungarian Paprikash with Chicken Fat Fried Okra

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  • Hungarian Paprikash with Chicken Fat Fried Okra

    My husband's family is from Hungary, so he grew up eating all kinds of things that were foreign to me, but to keep him from running home to his mother's house all the time for his comfort food, I decided to come up with the version of Hungarian Paprikash for him. He loves it more than me.
    Here are the ingredients:
    Chicken thighs- skin on, bone in (how many depends on how many you're feeding 2lbs. feeds 5)
    8 oz of diced tomatoes
    1 white or yellow onion- diced
    Okra- I usually buy a bag of frozen okra and defrost in microwave, but fresh is better
    1/2 cup of Chicken Stock
    1 tablespoon Arrowroot starch (dissolved in lukewarm water)
    1 tablespoon Sweet Hungarian Paprika
    1 tablespoon Half-Sharp Hungarian Paprikah
    1 teaspoon salt (if tomatoes are not already salted)

    Cooking time: 35-40 minutes
    Heat chicken thighs, skin side down, in large metal pan on stove for 10 minutes per side (or until cooked through).
    Place chicken thighs on cutting board and remove the skins from two thighs. Place chicken skin back into the metal pan with the rendered fat.
    Rinse defrosted okra with water and dry with paper towels.
    Place okra in pan of chicken skins and fat and cook on med/high until the skins are very, very crispy, stirring occasionally.
    Add onions to fat and cook until golden.
    Add tomatoes, chicken stock, paprika, salt, and dissolved arrowroot starch.
    Simmer for 5 min.
    Add either shredded/de-boned chicken pieces or whole thighs back into pan and simmer for a few minutes.
    Voila!
    This can be served over shredded cabbage or broccoli slaw, but I usually just eat it like it is- crispy skins and all.

  • #2
    Wow, this sounds amazing! My husband LOVES okra so I'm excited to be able to use it. We both love crispy chicken skins, so I'm drooling over that part, haha. Thanks for posting this!

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    • #3
      My mom's recipe for paprikash (her mom was hungarian) uses a pint of sour cream. basically, cook the onions & chicken in a bit of oil, then remove the chicken & add the sour cream & some paprika.

      i'd make it, but i just don't think i could enjoy it without the dumplings.
      And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the wind longs to play with your hair
      Kahlil Gibran

      http://simplesunshine.wordpress.com

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      • #4
        That sounds great! And aboutsaffron - there MUST be a fat based dumpling substitute! Suet, almond flour, baking powder?? There must be a way...!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by aboutsaffron View Post
          My mom's recipe for paprikash (her mom was hungarian) uses a pint of sour cream. basically, cook the onions & chicken in a bit of oil, then remove the chicken & add the sour cream & some paprika.

          i'd make it, but i just don't think i could enjoy it without the dumplings.
          My mom's paprikash also used sour cream but I use FAGE yogurt now. That's probably more original. Anyways, re: the dumplings, here is a chicken & dumpling recipe that I like...maybe you could try the dumplings in your paprikash?

          Chicken & Almond Flour Dumplings Soup recipe
          312/149/150

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          • #6
            We have always tried to like it, but found sour cream disgusting. It covers up the crunchy chicken skin yumminess.

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            • #7
              @mizski: thank you so, so much! i've tried googling some gluten-free dumplings, but only seem to find recipes for chinese dumplings. not the same thing, people! i'm definitely going to have to try this. i suppose after this, all i'll need to do is figure out how to make primal perogis, & i'll be one happy eastern european girl!

              @eraserheadgirl: yeah, the skin definitely isn't crunchy on the stuff i'm used to!
              And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the wind longs to play with your hair
              Kahlil Gibran

              http://simplesunshine.wordpress.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by aboutsaffron View Post
                i suppose after this, all i'll need to do is figure out how to make primal perogis, & i'll be one happy eastern european girl!
                Mr. Ski was 100% Polish and I'm Lithuanian and he REALLY loved his pierogi. This recipe may not be 100% primal but it is GF and not too off the primal mark IMO.

                Gluten Free Pierogies

                1/2 cup tapioca flour
                1/2 cup arrowroot
                3 tbsp potato starch flour
                3/4 tsp salt
                4 1/2 tsp xanthan gum
                3 large eggs
                1 1/2 tbsp vegetable oil (I use regular olive oil or avocado oil)

                In a medium bowl, combine dry ingredients.
                Beat the eggs lightly and add oil. Pour the egg-oil liquid into the flour mixture and stir. Work the dough into a firm ball. Knead 1 or 2 minutes.

                I usually make this dough ahead, refrigerate it then return to room temperature and run it through a pasta machine or roll very thin with a rolling pin. The dough may seem a little tough but the finished product tastes really good.

                Cut dough into circles (a glass works great for this). If the cut circles need a touch of individual rolling, do so.

                Place a small amount of filling* (~ 1 tsp – 1 TBS, depending on the size of your circles) in the center and pinch the top together, then go up the side from bottom to the top and repeat on the other side, sealing up to the top. Finally, seal with a fork by going around the edge. Flip over and repeat. Knead together scraps and re-roll.

                To cook, bring water to a boil. Salt as desired. Cook pierogi in the boiling water for ~five minutes.

                *For the filling I add a head of roasted garlic, some caramelized onions and wine sauerkraut or sautéed sliced mushrooms to my mashed potatoes.
                312/149/150

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                • #9
                  Have you ever tried potato dumplings? I eat them sometimes on high carb days. Not primal obviously, but I buy a mix at a store that sells imported food from Germany, and the only ingredients are potato flakes, potato starch, and salt; they are really good!
                  "Over-thinking, over-analyzing separates the body from the mind."

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                  • #10
                    I'll have to try it out! Thank you so much!
                    And forget not that the earth delights to feel your bare feet and the wind longs to play with your hair
                    Kahlil Gibran

                    http://simplesunshine.wordpress.com

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                    • #11
                      I love paprikash too. i think i'll cook me a pot today.

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                      • #12
                        @aboutsaffron- do you have any primal Hungarian dishes to share? I think we've exhausted a lot of my mother-in-law's old stand-bys (and a lot of them include dairy, which we don't do).

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                        • #13
                          All my grandparents were hungarian and kept kosher so virtually none of their dishes had dairy (at least the ones with meat, which is most). paprikash no sour cream, becinalt (basically just paprikash with lots of veggies), my all time favorite is leczo. My grandma makes big pots and then freezes them in little containers and I stock up. My favorite is to have it with an egg or two; scrambled in it, poached in it, etc.
                          I'm not sure how to make it but i think it's just fry onions and garlic, add a couple of pounds of sweet peppers maybe a little tomato sauce/crushed tomatoes/tomato juice (not sure which)and then stew it until soft.

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                          • #14
                            Also, fushirt, which are like little hamburgers made from the ground up 'throw away' parts of chicken. These are good to snack on even cold for a quick take away lunch.

                            Another great primal dish from grandma would be liver, sliced onions, sliced potatoes (take or leave), sliced hard eggs, fried together. Don't know if it's hungarian but it sure had a lot of paprika in it so i can only assume

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                            • #15
                              My mom made chicken rubbed in paprika, then baked. I like it on the dry side (no stewed tomatoes, etc) so I can dip it in melted butter with a little honey. Ooh, I think I am making this soon ~~

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