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  • Any Beef stew recipes?

    I have some grass fed stew meat and want to make a stew today, but all the recipes i find have flour and veggie oil etc.

    I might just throw something together, but wondering if anyone has any recipes?

    Thanks
    Family Living Simple blog

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  • #2
    Just found this. =) love her site

    http://everydaypaleo.com/2010/03/03/...liflower-mash/
    Family Living Simple blog

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    • #3
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/beef-burgundy-recipe/
      I've made this twice in the last week. So good!
      Melissa Fritcher - 330/252/150
      http://lessofmimi.wordpress.com
      Trample the weak, hurdle the dead.

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      • #4
        I made Mark's Beef Burgundy recipe yesterday (the one LessOfMimi included a link for). It smelled AMAZING cooking all day, and it tasted even better. That's going to become a regular part of my diet! I almost had some leftovers for breakfast
        Liz.

        Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
        Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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        • #5
          I often do this one with slight variations of quantities but generally its the same ingredients:

          beef (the fattier the cut the better), onions, carrots, celery, garlic, rosemary, smoked paprika, tin of tomatos, beef stock, red wine, salt & pepper.

          brown off the beef in a casserole dish
          remove beef and fry the onions, carrots, celery and garlic in a little olive oil
          add the beef and then all the ingredients
          put in the oven on gas mark 4 and leave for as long as you can resist, beleave me this is hard after an hour.

          if you want to serve with something I usually do some cabbage/cavalo nero/kale & mashed sweet potato

          you can also change the beef for some lamb if you want.

          also, have a look for some beef randang recipies like this one, just omit the rice (or do cauliflower rice) - http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/be...ithlemon_90061
          Last edited by lorez; 09-20-2010, 06:37 AM. Reason: adding an extra side dish

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          • #6
            I've never used flour - I just saute the meat. Remove from pot. Add onions, garlic and saute. Then add tomatoes, celery , red pepper,and carrots (if you eat them) add the beef back, add some red wine if wanted , let simmer for a few minutes and then add homemade beef stock or other meat stock. I cook mine all day on the fire. I add fresh herbs and sea salt and pepper at the end. The meat falls apart (we use bison- I just call it beef).
            A puree of turnips goes well on the side as does a salad or braised kale.

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            • #7
              Emril's recipe is AMAZING! I use all the spices, ignore anything that's not primal, just throw everything in the crockpot (instead of stove top) and let me tell you, it's incredible. We all love it!

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              • #8
                Oh man the beef burgundy looks great. I will try that this weekend.
                Family Living Simple blog

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by K.ROB View Post
                  I have some grass fed stew meat and want to make a stew today, but all the recipes i find have flour and veggie oil etc.

                  I might just throw something together, but wondering if anyone has any recipes?

                  Thanks
                  Make a daube?

                  Google: daube de boeuf

                  Some recipes may include flour as a thickener, but it doesn't require it - just leave it out.

                  Chilli is always a good option, too. Essentially, you want a pound of meat, an onion, a green pepper, 2 cloves of garlic, a tin of tomatoes, a squeeze of tomato puree, a 6 fl. oz. wineglass full of water, salt, and one teaspoon each of the following - cumin, dried oregano, and chiili powder. (or use a fresh chilli instead of the powder, if you've got one). Sear the meat; fry the onion, pepper & garlic more gently. (In fact, be careful not to put the garlic in if the pan's too hot - it smells unpleasant and tastes bitter if it gets too hot, and French chefs are said to hate the smell of Chinese restaurants on account it does get too hot in a wok). Add everything else and simmer for an hour - that could be done in an oven or on a stove top.

                  Of course, none of this is true hunter-gatherer style. When they "boiled" meat - which it seems many did more often than toasting it - they didn't braise it for a long time to break the connective tissue down, they did it for a short time and ate it fairly "pink".

                  It mightn't have been beef either:

                  http://americanart.si.edu/collection...twork/?id=4366

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                  • #10
                    I made beef burgundy once, a long time ago -- it was incredible!!! Looks really nice plated, too. Highly recommend you try it! Actually, I think I will get some stew meat and make it myself this weekend
                    Everything in moderation, including moderation.

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                    • #11
                      Where is the time line marked between fall apart meat and rubberized meat? I have had very little success getting stew meats, venison or beef, to come out tender. I always end up with wads of bouncy meat.

                      What temps and times are ideal for this?
                      Started my journey on May 22, 2010:

                      Beginning weight ~180
                      Current weight ~145

                      Nov. 9, 2009........Nov. 9, 2010.....Jun. 17, 2011
                      LDL 155...............LDL 176............LDL 139
                      HDL 39................HDL 66..............HDL 95
                      TGL 154..............TGL 77..............TGL 49

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                      • #12
                        For stew beef, I cook it slow and not very hot....so I did the Beef Burgundy for 4 hours at 300 (grass fed beef). If you do it long enough and not too hot, it's almost impossible to make it rubbery. I've sometimes cooked stews for more like 8 hours at 260.
                        Liz.

                        Zone diet on and off for several years....worked, but too much focus on exact meal composition
                        Primal since July 2010...skinniest I've ever been and the least stressed about food

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                        • #13
                          I made beef stew last night...here's the recipe:

                          * Almond flour
                          * 6 tablespoons (3/4 sticks) butter
                          * 2 pounds cubed stew meat
                          * 1 large leek, chopped
                          * 1/4 cup tomato paste
                          * 2 cups dry red wine
                          * 32 oz beef broth
                          * 2 lbs of beets
                          * other miscellaneous vegetables I needed to use up
                          * a bunch of fresh rosemary from my deck, chopped

                          Place almond flour in a pie pan. Season with salt and pepper. Melt 4 tablespoons butter in a large pot over medium-high heat. Working in batches, coat meat with flour; add to pot and brown on all sides. Using slotted spoon, transfer to plate.

                          Melt 2 tablespoons butter in same pot over medium-high heat. Add leeks; sauté until tender, about 6 minutes. Mix in tomato paste, then wine. Bring to boil, scraping up any browned bits. Add broth then beef and any accumulated juices. Bring to boil. Reduce heat, cover partially and simmer 1 1/2 hours.

                          Add beets; simmer uncovered until meat and vegetables are almost tender, about 30 minutes. Add the rest of your vegetables by cooking time. Season with salt and pepper.

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                          • #14
                            Primal Beef Stew with V-4

                            1 lb. grass fed stew meat, bison or beef
                            2 tomatoes
                            1 garlic clove
                            1 cup chopped celery
                            1 cup chopped carrot and 1 steamed carrot
                            1 cup sliced mushrooms
                            1 onion chopped
                            1 cup chopped broccoli
                            1 cup primal chicken or beef broth
                            2 cups of spinach
                            1 bay leaf
                            1 dried cayenne (optional)

                            Brown meat in bottom of large stockpot with enough olive oil to coat meat, S&P as well.
                            Place tomatoes in oven to roast for around 10-15 mins.
                            after tomatoes become soft remove from oven and place in blender with the garlic, steamed carrot and spinach, add a cup or so of water to develop a veggie juice basically V-4. Now add remaining ingredients to the pot and simmer until all veggies are tender.

                            You can add or subtract various vegetables these are just the ones I prefer and think it makes a pretty hearty stew. S&P to taste and enjoy

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                            • #15
                              Hey Kcult,
                              I find that using meat that is too lean, and then cooking it in too lean of a broth will make for rubbery meat. If you're cooking a fatty cut, some of the fat will render out into the broth, and then you can cook it as long as you want and it will never get rubbery. If you're cooking a lean cut, then you need to add additional fat, like butter, coconut milk, tallow, etc, in order to get it to have that nice fall-apart texture. Whatever you do, don't cook in just water!

                              One thing that happens to a lot of people too is that they buy beef stock (or chicken, or veggie, etc) and don't realize that they've purchased fat free stock. Traditional beef stock would have been quite high in fat, because when you make it you used marrow and other trimmings which are always fatty. Store-bought beef stock has hopped on the CV low-fat bandwagon. So, if you're going to use store bought beef stock, make sure you add some butter to it.

                              Or, just buy some marrow/soup bones, and make your own stock.

                              -Matt

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