Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Eating local not so ecological?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Eating local not so ecological?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/20/op..._r=1&th&emc=th

    Interesting op-ed.
    Never, never, never quit! -- Winston Churchill

  • #2
    It's no wonder the NY Times is losing readers. Blah.

    Comment


    • #3
      A modest cornucopia of mixed bullsh*t. Kinda reminds me of stories that get better after the fella's in the donut shoppe are done with them.
      Bit of fact, bit of urban legend, dubious math and the one that kills me ... another article where someone assumes they know what I'm thinking.

      Comment


      • #4
        Complete nonsense.
        Today is a new day. You will get out of it just what you put into it. If you have made mistakes, there is always another chance for you. And supposing you have tried and failed again and again, you may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call 'Failure' is not the falling down, but the staying down.

        Mary Pickford

        Comment


        • #5
          The article also leaves out any discussion of the relative nutritional value of food that is local versus shipped. Food loses a lot of its benefit in transit, particularly if it is coming from the other side of the world and treated with some of the preservation methods necessary to ship fresh fruit to the other side of the planet. It also ignores the importance of local farming to issues of food stability, regional economic health, transitioning away from destructive factory farming, and other factors. Eating local is about far more than just gasoline.
          “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

          Owly's Journal

          Comment


          • #6
            Ugh to that article. His blog "liberal curmudgeon" is aptly named.

            This article reminds me of so many news stories that use a lot of words to really say nothing and the author doesn't seem to get the joys of eating local. For most locavores, the cost of fuel is way down on the bottom of the list. For me, you just can't beat the taste of produce harvested that day (or in the case of peaches, a couple of days ago). I believe the produce, meats, dairy and eggs from small farms a mile or two up the road to be much healthier too.

            Locavores in New England understand all too well that this pleasure is seasonal. Yes, many preserve the bounties of summer for use during the winter but for the most part, during that time we have to go back to getting foods from other (warmer) parts of the country or even other countries. We also understand that foods like pineapples, kiwi and mac nuts will never grow in New England and we have to buy the shipped in stuff if we want those items.

            Eating local is not about math; it is about trying to eat foods grown in their season and without much fuss in processing and shipping. It's about supporting your local farmers. And it's about taste.
            312/149/150

            Comment


            • #7
              He can think whichever way he likes but for me and my family I'll take local foods anyday of the week. It is not only healthier but also I help support those around me. What could be better than that? This is also about control for me. We have no control over so many things in our lives but with this I do. I can meet the farmers and get to know them personally, even help them out on occasion which gives me a better understanding of where my food comes from and the energy required. Besides theres nothing like getting a little dirty here and there.
              Today is a new day. You will get out of it just what you put into it. If you have made mistakes, there is always another chance for you. And supposing you have tried and failed again and again, you may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call 'Failure' is not the falling down, but the staying down.

              Mary Pickford

              Comment


              • #8
                his analysis was from a single perspective, that of energy requirement in the production/transportation/storage/processing of food stuff. Ithink he makes a very good case from that perspective.

                Comment


                • #9
                  maybe, but who makes a decision like that based on ONE thing??

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Right guys but I don't think his point was to piss all over the other virtues of eating local food, just the environmental issue. There's plenty of other reason to do it.
                    Stabbing conventional wisdom in its face.

                    Anyone who wants to talk nutrition should PM me!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I actually liked the article, it's nothing but a simple life-cycle approach to agriculture and a slap on the face to dogmatic ecologists
                      “Every saint has a past and every sinner has a future.” -Oscar Wilde
                      "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -George Bernard Shaw
                      "The trouble with jogging is that the ice falls out of your glass." -Martin Mull

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'll continue to buy as much local food as possible while enjoying my daily avocado that is shipped from Cali (I live in Michigan) and my shredded coconut and coconut water that is from Brazil most likely.

                        I support the local food movement and buy all that I can from local farmers including my half cow. But avocados are my favorite plant food and they do not grow here in Michigan or anywhere nearby.
                        Find me at aToadontheRoad.com. Cheers!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Primal Toad View Post
                          I'll continue to buy as much local food as possible while enjoying my daily avocado that is shipped from Cali (I live in Michigan) and my shredded coconut and coconut water that is from Brazil most likely.

                          I support the local food movement and buy all that I can from local farmers including my half cow. But avocados are my favorite plant food and they do not grow here in Michigan or anywhere nearby.
                          yep. I eat local but I also eat chocolate.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I also have to accept some non-local foods--things like coffee, chocolate, and coconuts definitely don't grow in my part of the world! Still, I do my best and probably get about 90% of my weekly groceries at my local farmers market, so I figure I'm doing pretty well.
                            “If I didn't define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people's fantasies for me and eaten alive.” --Audre Lorde

                            Owly's Journal

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I think he raised some good points and added some much-needed perspective to the whole local food thing, but he also overlooked some critical factors mentioned by other posters here, like the freshness and healthfulness of foods, and the dangers of our factory farming system (which he lauded as a model of efficiency!)

                              He really should have talked about "seasonality" more, which is the key to making sense of eating local when you live in an area with a distinct growing season. So yeah, in the winter, the tomato trucked in from California is a better choice than the one grown in a Hudson Valley greenhouse. But in the summer, the local tomato would win on all counts. And in the winter, maybe you should just try to stick with canned tomatoes or a winter crop like kale instead.

                              We eat locally to the extent of our abilities. Almost all of our meat, dairy, and eggs are produced by local farmers. The same goes for potatoes, onions, apples, and other crops that are available close to year-round. In the summer, most of our green veggies and fruits come fresh from the farm market too, but in the winter we get them from the supermarket and supplement with a lot more frozen and canned products.

                              And in the meantime, I'm going to keep on buying my California avocados, wild Alaskan salmon, and Belize chocolate, since they sure don't grow around Philly.
                              The Primal Holla! Eating fat. Getting lean. Being awesome.

                              You were sick, but now you're well, and there's work to do. - Kilgore Trout

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X