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    I got some grass fed ribeye from Trader joes this weekend. problem is, I'm not sure how to cook it. Any ideas/advice?

  • #2
    Originally posted by grokka View Post
    I got some grass fed ribeye from Trader joes this weekend. problem is, I'm not sure how to cook it. Any ideas/advice?
    If you really love beef, the simpler the better.

    Salt, freshly ground pepper, sear on a hot grill.

    Or hot cast iron, bit of olive oil, pat of butter, salt and freshly ground pepper.

    Jealous--haven't had a ribeye in a long time.

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    • #3
      This advice is mostly distilled from Tender Grassfed Meat, which I highly recommend.

      Get some unfiltered extra virgin olive oil. The unfiltered is important as the filtering process removes enzyme-containing particulate matter. Rub the ribeye all over with the olive oil, about 2 Tb. Let the oil soak in for a little while, and then refrigerate for 24 hours (2 or 3 days is even better). The enzymes in the oil will break down the meat and make it more tender upon cooking.

      When ready to cook, bring the steak out of the fridge and let it come to room temperature, about an hour or so. Heat a cast-iron skillet over medium heat on the stove. Drop in 2 Tb of butter. When the butter is nice and hot and slightly smoking, it's time to cook! Salt the steak lightly on both sides, then cook the steak for 3-4 minutes on each side depending on desired doneness and the thickness of the steak. Take the steak off the heat, pour the pan drippings over the top, and let it rest 5-10 minutes.

      Grassfed ribeye prepared in this fashion is probably the best meat on earth.

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      • #4
        Hubby and I ate a ribeye that was just processed locally this week! after dry aging of course. I dont think I ever in my lifetime have had such an amazing steak. The consistency of the raw beef was that of velvety jello like softness. I allowed them to rest at room temperature, drizzled them with Organic EVOO, Sea Salt and Fresh Cracked pepper. Grill on HIGH, till internal temperature of 145 for medium rare. Allow to rest for 5 minutes, then ate. It MELTED in my mouth and was so rich and flavorful I could not eat it all. Had the leftover with eggs this morning. HELLA Good.

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        • #5
          best steak ever . . .

          Originally posted by prib81 View Post
          Grassfed ribeye prepared in this fashion is probably the best meat on earth.
          Amen to that. I just cooked my first ever grassfed ribeye using your instructions, prib81, and it is quite possibly the best steak I've ever tasted. And that's even taking into account the fact that I came home from a long, tiring day at work, cooked the steak to feed myself, alone, with no fanfare or side dishes, and have been eating it piecemeal standing at the kitchen counter over the past hour or so. (All other memorable steaks, needless to say, have had delicious settings, props, and sentiments to keep them in mind.) This steak has a crispy crust outside that contrasts with the densely flavorful meat inside. A light sprinkle of salt and a quick swipe through the buttery juices is all it needs. Just beautiful.

          I bought the steak last Saturday (the 17th, I think) from the local Whole Foods, feeling foolish for paying upwards of $15 for one steak just for measly me (their grassfed ribeye was over $34 per pound). But having browsed around the online menus for fancy steakhouses, such as Ruth's Chris, which charges upwards of $50 for a single serving of (corn-fed!) steak (with no sides), I'm starting to think that this grassfed ribeye from WF, home-cooked according to your instructions, is the bargain of the century. Btw, I initiated the virgin olive oil treatment on Sunday (the 18th), but didn't get around to cooking the steak until today, the 23rd. It had a nutty aroma when I unwrapped it from the fridge this afternoon, before cooking. It was (is; haven't quite polished it off yet) supremely delicious.

          Thanks so much for the guidance, prib81!

          PS: This is my first post, although I've been reading the forums for a couple of weeks. Glad to be joining you fine folks.

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          • #6
            Hey BeenBean!

            Welcome! I am just 2 months primal today, and believe me, this is one of the coolest places on the web to hang out. There are some truly amazing people here, and it's just loaded with inspiration. Glad you enjoyed your Steak, I have several cast Iron pieces, all of them very vintage that were handed down, and I will remember to use that the next ribeye we get. Our Local ribeye was just 17.00 a pound locally grassfed. a bargain considering what you had to pay for " GOOD" beef. There are many places to take short cuts in life, but Meat is non-negotiable. Looking forward to more posts from you! Jump right on in, It's very friendly around here.....

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            • #7
              Originally posted by beenbean View Post
              Amen to that. I just cooked my first ever grassfed ribeye using your instructions, prib81, and it is quite possibly the best steak I've ever tasted. And that's even taking into account the fact that I came home from a long, tiring day at work, cooked the steak to feed myself, alone, with no fanfare or side dishes, and have been eating it piecemeal standing at the kitchen counter over the past hour or so. (All other memorable steaks, needless to say, have had delicious settings, props, and sentiments to keep them in mind.) This steak has a crispy crust outside that contrasts with the densely flavorful meat inside. A light sprinkle of salt and a quick swipe through the buttery juices is all it needs. Just beautiful.

              I bought the steak last Saturday (the 17th, I think) from the local Whole Foods, feeling foolish for paying upwards of $15 for one steak just for measly me (their grassfed ribeye was over $34 per pound). But having browsed around the online menus for fancy steakhouses, such as Ruth's Chris, which charges upwards of $50 for a single serving of (corn-fed!) steak (with no sides), I'm starting to think that this grassfed ribeye from WF, home-cooked according to your instructions, is the bargain of the century. Btw, I initiated the virgin olive oil treatment on Sunday (the 18th), but didn't get around to cooking the steak until today, the 23rd. It had a nutty aroma when I unwrapped it from the fridge this afternoon, before cooking. It was (is; haven't quite polished it off yet) supremely delicious.

              Thanks so much for the guidance, prib81!

              PS: This is my first post, although I've been reading the forums for a couple of weeks. Glad to be joining you fine folks.
              Welcome beenbean! I'm glad you're enjoying your steak. I've got a couple ribeyes marinating in the fridge right now and will probably cook one of them for dinner tomorrow. I'm considering wrapping it in bacon and giving it the same treatment. I agree that it needs nothing besides the buttery goodness that it's cooked in and a touch of salt. Maybe some pepper if you want to get fancy.

              I had bison ribeye on the grill a while back - that was amazing too. Bison is very intensely flavored.

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              • #8
                Wipe the cat hair and dog hair out of the cast iron pan. Cook some bacon in it and eat that for breakfast. Don't let the cats and dog eat the fat outta the pan. Cook your ribeye in that when you get home for work. You can alternatively eat the ribeye for breakfast, and the bacon for dinner.

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                • #9
                  Thanks!

                  Thanks for the warm welcome, y'all! Acmebike, that sounds like an awesome proposition. I'll do my next ribeye that way (along with the EVOO treatment, too).

                  I've been primal (well, you know . . . "getting primal" is more like it) for a little over a month now. I've got a good bit of weight to lose, 40 or 50 pounds, and I've lost about 4 pounds, so things are moving more slowly for me than for some others, it seems, but, then, I've got Hashimoto's, so one expects that. Plus, I haven't been all that "strict" (have been consuming small amounts of nuts, dairy, and dark chocolate). I'm just trying not to get discouraged, which isn't too hard when I'm enjoying my food so much. This is a seriously delicious way to eat.

                  Quick question for y'all: is there a place to hang out around here just for folks who are focused on weight loss? I do think I'm going to need to be stricter to get the fat moving, and it would be nice to find one place where I won't be distracted by the more indulgent side of PB . . . any thoughts about that?

                  ETA: Never mind: I just discovered groups! Couldn't see those until I signed up.
                  Last edited by beenbean; 07-24-2010, 04:41 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Oh yes, ribeye, so good. It's a toss-up for me between ribeyes and prime rib. Both are tasty and fatty.

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                    • #11
                      We have slowly been working on our steak cooking skills and will certainly have to try the instructions here! Prime ribe and ribeye are both delicious. I should have some shortly as we are getting 1/4 of a cow soon- speaking of which I need to call to nail down how I want it processed.
                      Mama to 4, wife to my love

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PrincessGrok View Post
                        Hubby and I ate a ribeye that was just processed locally this week! after dry aging of course. I dont think I ever in my lifetime have had such an amazing steak. The consistency of the raw beef was that of velvety jello like softness. I allowed them to rest at room temperature, drizzled them with Organic EVOO, Sea Salt and Fresh Cracked pepper. Grill on HIGH, till internal temperature of 145 for medium rare. Allow to rest for 5 minutes, then ate. It MELTED in my mouth and was so rich and flavorful I could not eat it all. Had the leftover with eggs this morning. HELLA Good.
                        Hi Princess,
                        What do you mean by dry aging? Would this method work well on sirloin--- we got a large one at Farmer's Market last Saturday - it's currently in the freezer. My husband always grills our steaks, but this method sounds very tasty.

                        Thanks
                        My journal

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                        • #13
                          @AngieH,

                          The dry aging process is something that is done in specific by the processor that our Farmer uses. This is not done by us. It's a pretty specific environment where they do this, where temperature and humidity are strictly monitored and controlled. Wish I knew how to do it at home, it would make this whole process even MORE fun than it already is! I would inquire with your farmer or wherever you are purchasing your grassfed beef for details on how or IF they are doing so.

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                          • #14
                            Thanks, Princess. I will inquire next week at the market. It's a great farm, so I assume they may do the dry aging.
                            My journal

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                            • #15
                              I always rub the ribeye steak (about 2 lbs) with salt, pepper, chili, garlic and EVOO. I then grill it under a lid for about an hour depending on size. I use a thermometer to watch the internal temperature so it doesn't rise above 60 degrees. At that point I remove it from the grill and let it rest for about 10 - 15 minutes wrapped in tin foil.

                              Never fails to get me a juicy and tender ribeye.
                              Sometimes you need to be told the truth in order to be able to see it.

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                              I see grain people...

                              Exist in shadow, drifting away.

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