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What do you do with canned salmon?

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  • What do you do with canned salmon?

    I almost bought a can at the grocery store yesterday, but wanted to get some ideas for it first. The last time I opened a largish can of salmon that one of my ex-roommates left behind, I was a little surprised and grossed out. I'm used to tuna in a can...basically, just the meat of the fish. Obviously, there was more than that in the can of salmon. (skin?) So...do you use canned salmon? How do you use it? Do you use ALL of it?

  • #2
    Salmon patties?

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    • #3
      This may be a silly question, but would cooking it do anything to reduce or damage the Omega 3's in it? That's mainly the reason I wanted to pick some up.

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      • #4
        I believe canned salmon IS cooked.

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        • #5
          Yep! Canned salmon is cooked in the canning process. You could make salmon patties with it, treat it as you would tuna in salads... do crush up the bone and skin-that is where the calcium is--specially the bones, and since the salmon is cooked/canned the bones will just crumble away.
          Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
          ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
          Re-Start date 6/23/2011
          me--Post pregnancy --mama to a beautiful baby boy--
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          • #6
            I get the boneless skinless canned salmon. Otherwise, I feel like it's "carcass in a can" - the bones in particular creep me out. Just use it like you would canned tuna. You can use it for salads, patties, in soups, omelet, quiche. The ideas are limitless.
            Because if you didn't know, of that is life made: only of moments; Don't lose the now.
            ~Borges

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            • #7
              Me too. Boneless skinless in the can. I like cold salmon much better than cold tuna. I've made salmon patties but mostly I put it in a BAS. Yum yum.

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              • #8
                Ever since I was a little girl, I LOVED the salmon bones. Sooo delicious, I wish I could just buy a can of them!
                The nice part about being a pessimist is that you are constantly being proven right or pleasantly surprised.

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                • #9
                  I was looking on the can to see if it mentioned which parts of the salmon were in it and didn't see anything. Would it specifically say, "boneless, skinless" and if it doesn't, should I just assume that it does have those parts? And...Doh! as far as it being cooked. I should have assumed that. Are there some brands that are better than others?

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                  • #10
                    For my own tastes: Leave the skin and bones. Drain, but don't rinse it. A little mustard, touch of freshly ground pepper, a spoonful of capers, some finely chopped onion, a touch of fresh parsley if you've got it, a squeeze of lemon if you've got it, don't mix it to mush... better than tuna.

                    Something I love about canned salmon is that I actually prefer the cheaper brands.

                    I used to be able to find canned mackerel, and that was even cheaper and even better (though decidedly more fishy), but it seems it's not "good enough" to stock any more... may need to shop in a, shall we say, more economically-challenged area of town (and my area's challenged enough), because I can't find fresh chicken livers any more either...

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                    • #11
                      I find canned mackerel in Korean grocery stores in San Francisco. If you have any Korean stores in your area, worth a try. The ones in SF even carry several brands.

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                      • #12
                        I usually eat my canned fish on a salad or straight from the can (especially sardines).

                        Salmon meatballs work.

                        1 15 oz can of salmon (flaked)
                        2 eggs (free range omega 3 preferred)
                        juice and zest of 1/2 a lemon
                        1/2 cup grated cauliflower
                        1/2 cup grated onion
                        1/2 cup real bacon bits
                        1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese (optional I suppose)
                        1 clove garlic crushed and chopped
                        about 10 sprigs Italian parsley finely chopped
                        sage, dill, salt and pepper to taste

                        Mix everything together. Form into 10-12 meatballs. Bake on a cookie sheet at 350 for 20 minutes, broil for one minute, serve

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                        • #13
                          grol - those meatballs sound delicious! I think that will be one of the first things I try!

                          I'll just try a few brands and see which ones I like best. I'm almost certain that I saw mackeral while I was looking at them the other day but if it's fishy, I'm not sure that I can do it. Seafood is about the one thing that I'm super picky with. Texture/flavor issues.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TigerJ View Post
                            I find canned mackerel in Korean grocery stores in San Francisco. If you have any Korean stores in your area, worth a try. The ones in SF even carry several brands.
                            Makes sense, actually. Korean food seems to appreciate some strong flavors--and canned mackerel is pretty strong compared to other canned fish. I'll check it out.

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                            • #15
                              My hubby makes this for me on the weekends - it's my favorite breakfast of all time!

                              Saute onions in a skillet until soft, add a can of salmon and a little olive oil to keep things moist. Fry two eggs over easy and serve over the salmon. Sometimes he cooks up a little spinach or arugula on the side. It is so freaking delicious and I feel really full for hours!

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