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Any BBQ'ers out there? BBQ Brisket = FAIL

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  • #16
    stockjohn - I have not tried a grass fed again. I need to place another order. Haven't asked anyone on the BBQ forums either. Mine shrunk quite a bit too. Until I know more, I'll pobably stick with at least grain finished brisket. I don't cook them often enough and the time invested is too great to take another chance real soon.

    I do my smoking in a Big Green Egg, with a BBQ Guru that controls my pit temp and monitors my meat temps so I don't have to babysit my pit as much. Never tried starting of finishing in the oven so I can't really help you there.

    I wil say that even on the BBQ forums, brisket is known to be hard to cook, the lack of fat in the Grass Fed just increases the degree of difficulty.

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    • #17
      Intresting thread from the BBQ Brethren forum. http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=82160

      I may try using a Jaccard next time. http://www.bbq-brethren.com/forum/sh...ad.php?t=60572 I like 'Smoke & Beers' method, not exactly primal but I'm pretty sure there is a law against BBQ'ing without a beer in your hand.
      Last edited by cancerguy99; 07-12-2010, 10:02 AM. Reason: Adding a link

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      • #18
        if there isn't a law against it there should be. Maybe that was my problem...no beer. I put it on the smoker and then moved it to the oven while I worked out. That's pretty poor bbq etiquette.

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        • #19
          I know it sounds odd but putting it in a brine for awhile make help it retain some moisture, it works with turkeys and similarly they're lean and must be cooked low for several hours, just a thought.

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          • #20
            i cook the brisket in the slow cooker then grill it long enough to get some nice char marks...moist and tender inside, crispy brown outside.

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            • #21
              CG, try to brush the meat periodically with some olive oil and herbs and maybe lower the temp a bit... marinating the brisket overnight before adding the dry rub and cooking will also tenderize the meat an infuse it with flavor.... good eats...

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              • #22
                Originally posted by OnTheBayou View Post
                .

                I've developed a no-added-sugar-no-fructose rich, robust BBQ sauce. I'll post it if folks want. Family and friends want me to cook ribs whenever they visit.
                I'd love to get this recipe also! Sounds fantastic. I love bbq sauce, but bought from the store messes with my blood sugar too much.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JWheelz View Post
                  I'd love to get this recipe also! Sounds fantastic. I love bbq sauce, but bought from the store messes with my blood sugar too much.
                  I'd like it too!

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by revcozmo View Post
                    CG, try to brush the meat periodically with some olive oil and herbs and maybe lower the temp a bit... marinating the brisket overnight before adding the dry rub and cooking will also tenderize the meat an infuse it with flavor.... good eats...
                    Watching BBQ Pitmasters the other night and there was some injecting going on. I may do that also for a grass fed, not something I would normally do but it should help keep it moist.

                    This weekend will be a pastured pork shoulder for pulled pork. Much smaller than I'm used to cooking so I'll have to adjust my cook time for that too.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by stockjohn View Post
                      a chef friend of mine who does a ton of bbq told me that with grassfed brisket I should cook it to an internal temp of 210. Seems counterintuitive but he said that since over 12 hours of smoking you're squeezing out all the juice anyway, you need to keep bringing the temp up slowly so that the collagen breaks down fully...this is what makes good bbq tender, according to him. My brisket definitely doesn't look as fatty as a cornfed one so I'm going to roll the dice and give his advice a shot. I'll let you know how it goes. Here's what I'm doing:

                      - 3.5 lb. brisket, dry rubbed
                      - 4 hours in smoke at 285 - 300
                      - 8 hours in a 290 degree oven, wrapped in foil (I don't feel like standing by the pit all day so I'm cheating)
                      Yeah, I do my brisket in the oven. I use whatever marinade or rub I have available, put it in a pan, cover in foil, and cook at about 225 for 8-10 hours.

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                      • #26
                        Switch to chuck. It's better than brisket in every possible way.

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                        • #27
                          I just cooked a grassfed brisket this week. The skinny part of the meat came out tough and dry, the fat part came out great. I cook to an internal temp of 190 to break down the collagen - that gives it that silky moist goodness. This is a tough cut of meat - the chest muscle gets lots of workout. You need to cook it to a high internal temp to breakdown the collagen and connectivie tissue. Next time I am going to try the wrap in foil with some apple juice and let it rest method rather than just cooking it completely until done. I may cut off the skinny part of the brisket and cook it for less time - It gets overdone by the time the fat part is cooked.

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                          • #28
                            Them's "burnt ends."

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