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Elbow Macaroni replacement?

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  • Elbow Macaroni replacement?

    Hey all --

    My mom gave me one of my favorite recipes for American Chop Suey (we call it "goolash" here in New England even though it has no characteristics of the Eastern European dish). It's made with ground beef, chopped celery, onions, peppers, and elbow macaroni, with tomato sauce/soup. Obviously the elbow macaronis are a no-no Primally, and I've tried spaghetti squash, but I think the size of the elbows helps with the "idea" of the meal -- you can drop it in a bowl and eat with a large spoon, something you can't do with the spaghetti squash.

    So, anyone have any interesting/useful ideas that could keep in the spirit of the dish, but could replace the elbow macaroni?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Zucchini chunks, chopped greens, tomato chunks.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
    My Latest Journal

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    • #3
      Cauliflower rice.
      Rangers Lead the Way, Hooah!

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      • #4
        Totally off topic but I love New England terminology. Someone asked me the other day what I was drinking and when I told them a sugar free coffee Frappe I got the weirdest look. Then proceded to teach them about Frappe's and Milk shakes lol.

        I can't think of anything that would be an elbow macaroni substitute besides what has been mentioned.
        "Live Free or Die"

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        • #5
          Speaking of terminology, I love some of the localisms (not meant as an insult, I promise) I've run across.
          The idea of "you'se guys" being the plural for you just makes me fall over laughing. I realize "y'all" make some of you laugh, but it come naturally to me. Even my grandpa from Michigan uses it.
          The first time I head the term "feeder road" I spent 10 minutes trying to figure out what they meant.
          For quite a while, I was clueless as to what people meant by a "Porky" or a "state bear." I'd always heard them refered to as "state pork" or "highwaymen."
          I still have to mentally translate "pop" and "cola" to "Coke" or "soda"....
          OMG, I just died laughing... I have one coworker from England by way of Florida and one from S. Texas and they just spent 15 min arguing over the best fish for fried fish and whether it's "chips" or "fries". With the Brit (she's a good friend of mine), I've had to explain asado vs. guisado and that most people here use tartar sauce instead of malt vinegar.
          Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
          My Latest Journal

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          • #6
            Originally posted by naiadknight View Post
            Speaking of terminology, I love some of the localisms (not meant as an insult, I promise) I've run across.
            The idea of "you'se guys" being the plural for you just makes me fall over laughing. I realize "y'all" make some of you laugh, but it come naturally to me. Even my grandpa from Michigan uses it.
            The first time I head the term "feeder road" I spent 10 minutes trying to figure out what they meant.
            For quite a while, I was clueless as to what people meant by a "Porky" or a "state bear." I'd always heard them refered to as "state pork" or "highwaymen."
            I still have to mentally translate "pop" and "cola" to "Coke" or "soda"....
            OMG, I just died laughing... I have one coworker from England by way of Florida and one from S. Texas and they just spent 15 min arguing over the best fish for fried fish and whether it's "chips" or "fries". With the Brit (she's a good friend of mine), I've had to explain asado vs. guisado and that most people here use tartar sauce instead of malt vinegar.
            I get crap all the time from out of towners. For the most part I use all of these words http://www.worcestermass.com/words.shtml Which is really funny because I just did a google search and found this list.

            Think we have hijacked this thread enough lol.
            "Live Free or Die"

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            • #7
              I actually catch flack out here in West TX for some of my vernacular. It's not a thunderhead, it's a raincloud. It's not "comin' down a gullywasher," it's "gonna wash the cattle away." I found out really quick that flautas there and flautas here are not the same dish. It's not a ranch (under 100 acres), it's a "piece o' land." The best yet? I heard them tell a guy from NYC that "1000 square feet isn't a house, it's a shanty." Poor guy nearly fell over.
              Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
              My Latest Journal

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              • #8
                Wow... I just looked up one of those Texasism sites and was stunned by how many I actually use... I literally didn't realize that caddywampus, hissyfit, "come hell of high water," and many others that I use weren't that common outside of TX...
                How common is using "Heinz 57" to describe a mutt (57 varieties of dog in one)?
                Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, steak in one hand, chocolate in the other, yelling "Holy F***, What a Ride!"
                My Latest Journal

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                • #9
                  Mushrooms are a great bulky pasta replacement. They pretty much soak up the flavor of whatever they're cooked in.

                  Yesterday I made mac and cheese (homemade version) with cauliflower, and it was AWESOME!!! I boiled the cauliflower in chicken stock and white wine to give it a bit more flavor, something I used to do with pasta, because I found it so disgustingly bland.
                  The more I see the less I know for sure.
                  -John Lennon

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                  • #10
                    I've made something similar using broccoli slaw, in place of the macaroni.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks for the suggestions, guys!

                      As for terminology -- the best one is definitely frappe. People look at me like I have three heads when I say the term, and then when I explain the difference.

                      I also get a lot of flak for "bubbler", "packie", and anything that has a hard "r" sound. Guess you can't change where you're born and raised!

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