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  • Primal & Jewish?

    What's a Jew to do? Friday nights are typically celebrated with a nice challah (braided egg bread) and wine. (Not to mention candles, prayers, and dinner.) So, how does one substitute a primal thing for challah? After all, it's "tradition" (raises forefingers to sky, singing, a la Tevye)!!

    Mind, I'm not trying to argue in favor of the challah. I'm honestly trying to find a way to honor the Sabbath traditionally without compromising nutrition and health. Honoring the spirit rather than the letter, y'know?

    Are there any Primal Jews out there who have faced this challenge?

  • #2
    Maybe you can just honour it by touching it (the bread, I mean - a sip of wine should be OK) to your lips. If you need to tear off a chunk (sorry, I don't know the details of your tradition) maybe you can later crumble it outside, for the birds (also creatures of God)...

    I'm just looking at this from my own experience with Orthodox Christianity and Paganism. I don't know much about Judaism, and I hope I haven't suggested anything that would be offensive!

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    • #3
      Eat a teeny bite of it and be done with it.

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      • #4
        Greetings!

        I am not Jewish, but would this work? It is a coconut flour bread that is on Mark's blog-- here is the link-- http://www.marksdailyapple.com/coconut-flour/ I have not tried it, but it sounds interesting, and it does have egg in it, so you are getting the eggy bread!
        Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
        ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Sherissima View Post
          Maybe you can just honour it by touching it (the bread, I mean - a sip of wine should be OK) to your lips. If you need to tear off a chunk (sorry, I don't know the details of your tradition) maybe you can later crumble it outside, for the birds (also creatures of God)...
          That is what we did with leftover Communion bread/wafers that were left over after service.
          Every day is another stitch in the quilt of life.
          ~*~*~*~*~*~*~
          Re-Start date 6/23/2011
          me--Post pregnancy --mama to a beautiful baby boy--
          273.4/269.3/115
          Hubby--230/227.8/165

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          • #6
            Do you make it yourself or buy a loaf? Are there other people sharing it? Do you have Shabbos at your house or do you go to someone else's? Because eating a teeny bite may not be practical if it's your house and just your family, and then you've got this big honkin' loaf of challah left.

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            • #7
              I know with challah it is not just a matter of adjusting a recipe, there is tradition in the process of making the bread. I think you should honor the tradition. My recommendation is to just have a small piece. One serving will not send you straight back to carb dependency.

              As for the wine. Drink up.

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              • #8
                Sunshine may have some insight on this...

                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...illakat/page21

                Post #202
                Last night we had a wonderful shabbat dinner with one guest. The other invitees couldn't make it which was fine....possibly even good. Because they didn't come, we skipped the Challah (which I never ate anyway) and just used the Arnolds round flat buns that dh got for the burgers. Oh, and the burgers were because the girls wanted them rather than brisket. Am down 15.8lbs and more than a few inches.
                God is great, beer is good, people are crazy

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                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bz8Yptnh2kg
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                Beef Cake's Primal Hardcore Porn<strike>Erotica<strike>...er...I mean my journal...

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                • #9
                  I'm primal and Jewish and celebrate being both. I just don't eat challah. I do drink red wine. We have some gorgeous Etna volcanic region reds that I wouldn't pass up. Then again, I'm also agnostic, so maybe you don't want to listen to me. Anyway, I don't see it as an issue. If eating the challah is that important to you, then just have a small piece and be done with it. I always have some challah with honey on Rosh Hashana.

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                  • #10
                    Would you be able to make your own? I did some searching, and I saw a recipe for a raw vegan almost-grain-free challah, and it says that challah technically has to contain at least one grain, so they used 3 grains of buckwheat for a whole loaf. =] So could you just make any primal bread substitute recipe (they all tend to be very eggy), and throw in a pinch of flour or cornstarch or something?
                    "mayness, you need to have a siggy line that says "Paleo Information Desk" or something!" -FMN <3

                    I'm blogging again, at least a little bit.

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                    • #11
                      I make it at home. We have erev Shabbat dinner at home. And yeah, I am left with a "big honkin' loaf of challah" even when everyone is raving about how good it is!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by taboulichic View Post
                        I make it at home. We have erev Shabbat dinner at home. And yeah, I am left with a "big honkin' loaf of challah" even when everyone is raving about how good it is!
                        Can you send the rest home with someone? Is there anyone maybe in your neighborhood who would like it for say, French toast on Sunday (challah makes damn good French toast)? I imagine if you live in a Jewish neighborhood everyone already has their own leftover challah. But if not, maybe a friend or neighbor could take it off your hands? I'm sure someone would love to have some homemade challah. And hey, that would be another miztvah (tzedakah)!

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                        • #13
                          I wonder, What would you do if you were allergic to any of the ingredients? Personally, since it's important to you, I would talk with a Rabbi that you see eye to eye with. Explain that you're changing your diet for your health... and you don't eat bread. Ask for an acceptable, if any, alternative.

                          OR, since you might not actually have any intolerance to the ingredients It seems reasonable that you could purchase a muffin sized challah (talk with your bakery about such realities? What is a single person to do?) so that you may take a bite, as suggested. Personally, I think if anyone is willing to allow a cheat now and then, those that coincide with religious tradition should get priority.

                          Is the bread considered sacred at any point during this tradition? If so, I absolutely would take great consideration as to how to appropriately dispose of leftovers. In a Catholic realm you would absolutely NOT take the "leftover" host out and feed it to the birds.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by twinmama View Post
                            Is the bread considered sacred at any point during this tradition? If so, I absolutely would take great consideration as to how to appropriately dispose of leftovers. In a Catholic realm you would absolutely NOT take the "leftover" host out and feed it to the birds.
                            I'm sure a lot of birds have eaten a lot of challah through the centuries. It would better to feed birds than the challah completely go to waste (if no person wanted it). But then, I ain't a rabbi.

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                            • #15
                              i was wondering the same thing about those with allergies. I mean celiacs can't have any gluten whatsoever, so what do they do? forgo the bread, or perhaps make a gluten free substitute?

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