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Shrove Tuesday Coming: paleo pancakes?

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  • Shrove Tuesday Coming: paleo pancakes?

    I just noticed that Shrove Tuesday was coming up.

    When I was a kid we always had pancakes, and there were pancake races at school and so on. I don't think people even notice times and seasons so much these days, but I guess it goes on in a desultory manner.

    Shrove Tuesday, of course, marked the begining of Lent. The French equivalent is Mardi Gras (Literally Fat Tuesday). On this day people used up their luxuries before the start of Lent, which was a fast-time. There are historical roots to that, obviously, but also I think it went with the time of year. (This is roughly speaking, because, of course Easter moves around, being, I understand, tied to the Jewish festival of Passover, which depends on a lunar calendar. Also, Western and Eastern Christians calculate the date for Easter differently, so it gets complex.) But anyway, seasonally this was just before entering a time of year when Winter stores were running low and foods that arrived with Spring had yet to turn up.

    What I'm not sure about is why pancakes specifically became tied up with Shrove Tuesday in England (and maybe other places?). It can't have been the flour. Maybe it was the eggs - not sure whether they were acceptable fasting food in Western European culture or not.

    Anyone going to have any? I think I might have some buckwheat pancakes. Buckwheat makes some of the best pancakes anyway, and is of course gluten-free, and I'm not particularly scared of grains, although I think modern culture over-eats them massively. But I guess anyone who's "full paleo" could have them anyway, since it should be possible to use almond flour or coconut flour - or some mixture of flours.

  • #2
    We have pancakes every Saturday. Spelt banana blueberry whey pancakes with pure maple syrup. Delicious. Paleo? That's subjective.

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    • #3
      I believe it was a way to get rid of excess wheat flour and stuff in preparation for lent. I don't keep up with religious practises, so I may be wrong, and I'm too arrogant to google


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      • #4
        Elana Amsterdam posted a paleo recipe on her blog Elana's Pantry ( Elana's Pantry | Healthy Grain-Free & Gluten-Free Paleo Recipes ), which doesn't look too bad for a treat! I certainly thought it would be worth trying out, as my family love pancakes! I would hazard a guess that they might be better with a savoury filling rather than a sweet, though.

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        • #5
          The origin is that it was a way to use up eggs, milk and sugar before lent. It's not the flour.

          Just an observation - the pancakes we make in the UK are different from American pancakes. We make a thin batter and the pancakes are wider and thinner, but not quite crępes. Putting lemon and sugar on the pancakes must be the most traditional topping I can think of. In my family we very often had pancakes only for dinner. We'd have one or two savoury fillings each and a sweet one. We're not at all religious by the way, but these traditional holidays often overcome all that!

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          • #6
            Perfect Paleo Pancakes - The Paleo Mom These are THE best paleo pancakes I've ever tried. They depend on you having green plantains, though. Ripe plantains can be used but the pancakes will be sweeter and banana flavored. If you have green, you'd swear they're regular wheat pancakes.
            Out of context quote for the day:

            Clearly Gorbag is so awesome he should be cloned, reproducing in the normal manner would only dilute his awesomeness. - Urban Forager

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            • #7
              Stalkerville - Recipe Sharing Site for Paleo Inspired, Real Food and www.pinterest.com have a plethora of paleo pancake recipes
              | My (food) Blog | Follow me on Facebook | Pinterest | Twitter |

              “It does not take a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority, keen on setting brushfires of freedom in the minds of men.” - Samuel Adams

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MuchLove View Post
                The origin is that it was a way to use up eggs, milk and sugar before lent. It's not the flour.

                Just an observation - the pancakes we make in the UK are different from American pancakes. We make a thin batter and the pancakes are wider and thinner, but not quite crępes. Putting lemon and sugar on the pancakes must be the most traditional topping I can think of. In my family we very often had pancakes only for dinner. We'd have one or two savoury fillings each and a sweet one. We're not at all religious by the way, but these traditional holidays often overcome all that!
                Thanks for clarification, we used to put golden syrup on ours.


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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Wildrose View Post
                  Perfect Paleo Pancakes - The Paleo Mom These are THE best paleo pancakes I've ever tried. They depend on you having green plantains, though. Ripe plantains can be used but the pancakes will be sweeter and banana flavored. If you have green, you'd swear they're regular wheat pancakes.
                  Co-sign, the mucilage is a magic binder. I usually add various baking spices then dot with frozen berries while cooking.
                  37//6'3"/185

                  My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                    Thanks for clarification…
                    The "clarification" was doubtless kindly meant, but its value is limited by its being historically wrong.

                    Milk and sugar can have nothing to do with it. Milk was a fasting food for these people, and sugar would hardly have been covered by fasting rules, because it simply wasn't around until the into the 14th century and then only for those who could afford it.

                    Dairy products were also regularly consumed on fast days, substituting for fish
                    http://www.researchgate.net/profile/...5b04000000.pdf

                    This is in the West, of course. Fasting in the East, as far as I can gather, meant not fish, or whatever was agreed as substituting for it (including seabirds), but something much more like a vegan diet. This, by the way, is why some of the proponents of the elusive "Mediterranean Diet" have now began to turn their attention to Eastern Orthodox monastics.

                    Eggs, as I say, I don't know about.

                    But history and culture aside, yeah lots of interesting recipes to try I'm sure.

                    Here's a recipe using soaked grain I found. I guess buckwheat would work for this - or maybe teff, which is one gluten-free grain I've never tried, but which seems to be increasingly popular.

                    Soaked Pancakes Recipe from Nourishing Traditions

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                    • #11
                      Some of my family are very staunch roman Catholics. ... For them lent signifies the start of not only a religious fast and reverence but the beginning of loads of mini religious events... many based around food... When else would you eat a carling? !

                      Direct family won't eat meat on any friday and give up all "nice" treats and enjoyable food for the day. That's any Friday of the year.

                      I don't live like that. But I'm using it as an excuse to give up chocolate. ....I may be far more liberal but the whole lentern ethos means I will stick to a pledge made during this time.

                      I will be having normal non paleo pancakes on shove tuesday. Pure laziness i know.

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                      • #12
                        The "clarification" was actually not a clarification at all. It was just me pointing out my experience with why we have pancake day. Rich foods were not supposed to be eaten during lent and therefore people made delicious pancakes before the fasting period. Whether or not you agree with me is your own matter. I'm simply passing on what my grandparents heard from their grandparents.

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                        • #13
                          MuchLove - in the future please have your grandparents' grandparents improve their research into 14th century English diets before passing on their traditions.

                          Seriously - it is just about making a break between rich foods and leaner foods. Eggy, buttery, fried pancakes fit the bill.
                          My staunchly Anglican grandmother followed this tradition. Then in Lent it was dry toast. No butter, no jam.
                          Supposed to make you introspective.
                          https://instagram.com/dinnerwithek/

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                          • #14
                            ha, growing up in England we always had dinner of pancakes on pancake day. Big thin ones, eaten hot from the pan, sprinkled with sugar and lemon juice and rolled up into a roll.

                            I am going to a pancake party so in the spirit of social bonding I will invoke the spirits of 20% and feast on a large number of pancakes made from battery eggs, homogenised milk and white wheat flour. I will at least take butter to cook mine in!

                            I do make Breton crepes with buckwheat about every 2 months or so, but they are a very different thing. I do them with savoury fillings (egg, ham, camembert, mushrooms). I wouln't feel 'right, having buckwheat pancakes for pancake day!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Vainamoinen View Post
                              The "clarification" was doubtless kindly meant, but its value is limited by its being historically wrong.

                              Milk and sugar can have nothing to do with it. Milk was a fasting food for these people, and sugar would hardly have been covered by fasting rules, because it simply wasn't around until the into the 14th century and then only for those who could afford it.



                              http://www.researchgate.net/profile/...5b04000000.pdf

                              This is in the West, of course. Fasting in the East, as far as I can gather, meant not fish, or whatever was agreed as substituting for it (including seabirds), but something much more like a vegan diet. This, by the way, is why some of the proponents of the elusive "Mediterranean Diet" have now began to turn their attention to Eastern Orthodox monastics.

                              Eggs, as I say, I don't know about.

                              But history and culture aside, yeah lots of interesting recipes to try I'm sure.

                              Here's a recipe using soaked grain I found. I guess buckwheat would work for this - or maybe teff, which is one gluten-free grain I've never tried, but which seems to be increasingly popular.

                              Soaked Pancakes Recipe from Nourishing Traditions
                              Um, thanks for even more clarification?




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