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Anyone know of any off the grid primal communities?

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  • #31
    These ideas always fail on one thing. People don't like to farm, it's too f-ing hard. Having a garden to play in and supplement your food supply is one thing. Farming for a living vs a garden is like comparing Mother Teresa to Lindsey Lohan. You might find a few things in common but no one is going to mistake one for the other.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Paul R View Post
      These ideas always fail on one thing. People don't like to farm, it's too f-ing hard. Having a garden to play in and supplement your food supply is one thing. Farming for a living vs a garden is like comparing Mother Teresa to Lindsey Lohan. You might find a few things in common but no one is going to mistake one for the other.
      Not sure "always fail" is true. Definitely a challenge and only an option for those who can commit and find the beauty and connection to nature in it. Others could live in off the grid sustainable housing communities, work at "regular" jobs and support those committed to food production. There will be lots of experimentation and there will be many variations with the overall goal of sustainability and healthy eating.
      Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

      https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Paul R View Post
        These ideas always fail on one thing. People don't like to farm, it's too f-ing hard. Having a garden to play in and supplement your food supply is one thing. Farming for a living vs a garden is like comparing Mother Teresa to Lindsey Lohan. You might find a few things in common but no one is going to mistake one for the other.
        That's actually a great point! Most folk (probably including myself) would tire quickly of all that manual labor. LOL! I was serious though, when I said that I would live nearby and hang out with you guys though!!

        And yes, let's stop the thread highjack and get back to the OP!


        Sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum

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        • #34
          I'm sure of the 1000's started in the 60's and 70's none survive.

          I farm so I'm speaking from experience on how people react to it. We grow wine grapes so LOTS of people come out and think they can give it a try. In general they last less than 2 hours. I've never had an intern not get sunstroke on the first day despite me spending and hour plus telling them how to not get sunstroke before they start.

          Just saying if you are serious about this you need to give a lot of thought to your farmers and ranchers. The quote 'beauty and connection' to nature shows me your'e not really in touch with the difficulty of farming. That's not why those of us who do it do it. It's a nice side benefit, but not why anyone farms.

          I'm just being like a VC and poking holes in your plan to help you make it stronger. It's a very attractive idea, but let's say you think having a vineyard and wine in your community would be a good thing. How would you get me to take part? I'm telling you if you tried the 'connection to nature' line I'd laugh at you and my wife would kick you in the nuts.

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          • #35
            Sakitumi Puppet... You may be on to something. The things I say can come across as quite aggressive, especially on the interwebz. I also snapped the necks and de-scaled fish as a child. Woe is me.

            To be on topic: Around here (Seattle) there are lots of neighborhoods going up under the "sustainable" brand. By sustainable, I mean common garden areas for vegetables and fruits, solar power, and hiring a truckload of goats to "trim" the grass on the hillside. It is certainly not self-sustaining, but kicks the ass of other places I have lived (such as Louisville, KY).
            Last edited by kathleen; 08-14-2014, 11:51 AM.
            Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

            Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
            Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
            Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
            F/23/5'9"

            26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Paul R View Post
              I'm sure of the 1000's started in the 60's and 70's none survive.

              I farm so I'm speaking from experience on how people react to it. We grow wine grapes so LOTS of people come out and think they can give it a try. In general they last less than 2 hours. I've never had an intern not get sunstroke on the first day despite me spending and hour plus telling them how to not get sunstroke before they start.

              Just saying if you are serious about this you need to give a lot of thought to your farmers and ranchers. The quote 'beauty and connection' to nature shows me your'e not really in touch with the difficulty of farming. That's not why those of us who do it do it. It's a nice side benefit, but not why anyone farms.

              I'm just being like a VC and poking holes in your plan to help you make it stronger. It's a very attractive idea, but let's say you think having a vineyard and wine in your community would be a good thing. How would you get me to take part? I'm telling you if you tried the 'connection to nature' line I'd laugh at you and my wife would kick you in the nuts.
              No worries, I hear you. I come from a family of farmers and spent many summers working on the farm. Believe me I know it's a full time job and not for the faint of heart. I'm looking for a new model, not your 60's style commune. One that combines modern technology with a more holistic approach to living through organic gardening, sustainable buildings and breaking free from the utilities we tend to rely on. Still working on defining how it would actually work that's why I'm investigating a wide variety of approaches. Thanks for your input, it's good to not live in la la land and be fully aware of the challenges. I agree that many farmers would laugh at the "connection to nature" line but they are probably the ones still using artificial fertilizers, gmo's and harsh pesticides.
              Last edited by canuck416; 08-14-2014, 01:16 PM.
              Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

              https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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              • #37
                Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
                A great idea: let's give the thread back to Canuck!

                Monsieur Canuck, you should explore co-housing communities as a concept. While not off grid (necessarily) or primal, there are aspects that get at the concept you asked for input on. There is a nice efficiency in not everyone having to own a lawn mower, root tiller, chicken coop, workshop, pickup truck, etc. and most co-housing communities naturally embrace energy efficiency and related sustainability concepts.
                I agree, this might be a more appropriate concept. Still playing with ideas and open to all. Great discussion, thanks for participating.
                Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                • #38
                  A big factor in making a sustainable community is the price of the land. It is very hard to make a farm pay for a mortgage, produce a profit and support the members of the community. If you take away the mortgage it makes it more feasible.

                  As I've stated where I live a lot of people live off the grid, most of them make their living off the land by growing a crop that once was worth a lot. Those that bought their land years ago when land was cheap and the crop they grew sold for a lot did okay. OTH the ones that moved here in the last few years paid way too much for their property and now the price of their crop has plummeted. I predict we'll be seeing quite a few off the grid properties for sale in the next few years as the older folks start moving to town and the young ones find that they can't make a off living off the land anymore.

                  So if you're looking to buy an off the grid set up and you don't need the land to produce $$$ it may be worth looking into.
                  Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                  • #39
                    In reference to this discussion I thought you'd all enjoy this email I received from a Primal friend. Not something many of us could do but it sure sounds great!...

                    "I'm packing up to move to Molokai soon. I bought a house with a solar system. You would like it. Molokai is one of the smaller Hawaiian Islands and does not have the big tourist infrastructure of cruise ships and hotels so most travelers pass it by. I was there in June for a vacation and just fell in love with the place and decided to stay. I fly out Sept 2.

                    Molokai is also a great place to be Primal. They have a livestock co-op that sells the best grass fed beef I have ever tasted locally grown. And the produce there is amazing. It seems like the volcanic soil just makes everything richer and more vibrant. You can taste the vitamins popping out of a fresh picked tomato there.

                    The weather varies between low 70s to low 80s but always with a nice breeze from the trade winds. How is that for temperate? The house I'm buying has fruit trees in the yard, bananas, figs, guavas. On Saturdays Main Street turns into a farmers market where anybody who has extra from their garden can set up a card table and sell or trade. The fishermen also sell their catch of the day out of coolers in the back of pickup trucks along Main Street. Your tastebuds have not lived until you have had ahi poke where the ahi has never been frozen. And truly raw macadamia nuts fresh out of the shell are awesome.

                    While it is not intentionally a "Primal Community", many of the people on Molokai do live very close to Grok. Between fishing, hunting wild pigs and deer, and the incredible ease of having a garden plot and picking fruit and nuts off the trees there, it would be easy to live very close to the land, only rarely going to the market for a jar of coconut oil.

                    People talk about how expensive it is to live in Hawaii and it is true that packaged goods from the mainland like cereal and sodas are massively marked up but that is all the stuff we don't eat anyway. The locally grown Primal fare is quite reasonable."
                    Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                    https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                    • #40
                      So, just out of curiosity, what does this primal friend of your's do for a living to be able to live like that. It sounds incredible.
                      Some people just need a sympathetic pat... On the head... With a hammer.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by AuroraB View Post
                        So, just out of curiosity, what does this primal friend of your's do for a living to be able to live like that. It sounds incredible.
                        I know, what a lucky bastard

                        Sent from my XT557 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by AuroraB View Post
                          So, just out of curiosity, what does this primal friend of your's do for a living to be able to live like that. It sounds incredible.
                          Not sure, I do know she's retired, sold her house in SoCal and decided to do the move after visiting the islands. I'm definitely planning on a visit to check out the island and now playing with the idea of organizing some 3 to 5 day Primal retreats there.
                          Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                          https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by canuck416 View Post
                            Recently I've been envisioning pulling together some like minded people and building an environmentally friendly and sustainable off the grid primal community consisting of mid size homes surrounded by organic gardens and fruit trees with pastured animals located in a temperate climate. Would want enough power generated to enjoy some modern conveniences (internet connections etc). If you ever hear of such a community being built or in existence please let me know.Thanks! -

                            johnsaville21@gmail.com

                            PS-Ha Ha...Not planning on a cult or dropping out of society! More like an example of how people can live with sustainability and mindfulness.
                            So, kinda like the Amish but with internet connection?
                            "It's true, you are a good woman. Then again, you may be the antichrist."

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by ilovesteak View Post
                              So, kinda like the Amish but with internet connection?
                              Ha ha!...Sort of, but I prefer to call it the new modern. Never before have we had access to the kind of recycled building materials, energy efficient devices and alternative energy tools that we have today and they are getting better and less expensive at an extraordinary rate. Combine this with a more enlightened understanding of how we can be more mindful in our lifestyles - buying or growing our own local and organic produce when possible, eating pastured meats, free range poultry and wild fish, supporting community gardens etc. All of these things are I believe creating a new opportunity to organize our living experience in exciting new ways. Access to the internet is vital because it connects us with our tribe of like minded thinkers, sharing the ideas and best practices that will help us fine tune and explore a variety of options to the process.
                              Last edited by canuck416; 08-18-2014, 08:40 AM.
                              Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                              https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Urban Forager View Post
                                A big factor in making a sustainable community is the price of the land. It is very hard to make a farm pay for a mortgage, produce a profit and support the members of the community. If you take away the mortgage it makes it more feasible.

                                As I've stated where I live a lot of people live off the grid, most of them make their living off the land by growing a crop that once was worth a lot. Those that bought their land years ago when land was cheap and the crop they grew sold for a lot did okay. OTH the ones that moved here in the last few years paid way too much for their property and now the price of their crop has plummeted. I predict we'll be seeing quite a few off the grid properties for sale in the next few years as the older folks start moving to town and the young ones find that they can't make a off living off the land anymore.

                                So if you're looking to buy an off the grid set up and you don't need the land to produce $$$ it may be worth looking into.
                                Thanks for the insight and suggestion. I also think that some of those farmers focused too heavily on large mono crops and some needed to rely on government farm subsidies to keep them viable as they were susceptible to global market fluctuations. What I envision are smaller more mixed farms supplying farm to table food for locals rather than the factory farming concept currently the norm in the American farming community. This is already currently happening successfully here in Sonoma County and many other places, not only here in the States but around the world. We can learn from these examples and by sharing best practices can help make this a viable option.
                                Recent Blog: http://www.peakperformanceradio.net/...y-john-saville

                                https://www.facebook.com/PaleoJourne...?ref=bookmarks

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