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Lebanese Food - A great paleo/primal option when eating out or in a hurry!

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  • Lebanese Food - A great paleo/primal option when eating out or in a hurry!

    Anyone else here realized the utter joy and beauty a good Lebanese restaurant offers someone in the Paleo/Primal lifestyle?

    If you are looking for a healthy option when eating out, try a Lebanese place.

    I usually order a chicken shawarma platter - roast chicken off a spit, lettuce, tomato, pickle, cabbage, beets, onion, garlic cream, tahini, a bit of hummus (a bit isn't bad, lots might be) or some fatoush salad.

    Just say no to the pita bread, and drink lots of water and tea.

    Talk about satisfaction - crisp roasted chicken contrasted with smooth white cool garlic cream, smothered in tahini, or steak shish tawook, or lamb, or beef on a spit....

    *makes Homer Simpson eating noises*

  • #2
    See the resistant starch thread for more reasons why Lebanese (and Uyghur, Berber, Persian, Irish, British, etc.) traditional food is largely good. I, for one, am not afraid of hummus. Heck, even Ray Peat said a little hummus now and then is OK.
    Last edited by Paleophil; 06-04-2014, 05:11 PM.
    Originally posted by tatertot
    Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong.
    "our ancestors obtained resistant starch and other fermentable fibers by eating a diversity of wild plant foods, bulbs, corms, tubers, cattails, cactuses, and medicinal barks..." -Mark Sisson

    "I've long ago tossed the idea that a particular macro ratio is poison, and am now starting to think that the EM2…is defined less by novel NADS…and more by the gut microbiome and environmental pseudocommensals ..." -Kurt Harris, MD

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    • #3
      sounds delicious. i've never had Lebanese food before. def have to put that on the ol' "To Eat" list!
      "Always be yourself. Express yourself. Have faith in yourself. Do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it." -Bruce Lee

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      • #4
        Yeah, middle eastern food is the stuff.
        Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

        Griff's cholesterol primer
        5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
        Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
        TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
        bloodorchid is always right

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        • #5
          We had homemade primal middle eastern food for dinner tonight: keftas with fresh mint, homemade hummus, marinated roasted peppers on homemade GF naan.
          Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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          • #6
            Only had shawarma once. Twas good. The beauty of food from that region is that nearly every dish can be made without the inclusion if grains/bread. As well as being frighteningly simple to make.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mr. Ted View Post
              Anyone else here realized the utter joy and beauty a good Lebanese restaurant offers someone in the Paleo/Primal lifestyle?
              Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
              The beauty of food from that region is that nearly every dish can be made without the inclusion if grains/bread. As well as being frighteningly simple to make.
              It can be, but is it, in a restaurant setting?

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              • #8
                Lebanese Food - A great paleo/primal option when eating out or in a hurry!

                [QUOTE=eKatherine;1492755]It can be, but is it, in a restaurant setting?[/

                In my opinion, recipes are as traditional in restaurants as they are at home, at least in Persian restaurants. Persians are immensely proud of their traditions and culture, and food is no exception.
                I started the 'mecca of middle eastern foods' thread a while ago, so if you're curious to know what goes in some of the more popular dishes, it's worth a look.
                Last edited by Jenry Hennings; 06-05-2014, 08:05 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mr. Ted View Post
                  If you are looking for a healthy option when eating out, try a Lebanese place.
                  I was at an Egyptian buffet once, I think the menu is similar. Lamb shanks, grilled shrimp, olives. The wheat used in taboulleh doesn't seem to bother me, plus a little dolma and (wonderfully seasoned) pilaf. There were mountains of bread of course but easily separated.

                  Originally posted by Paleophil View Post
                  I, for one, am not afraid of hummus. Heck, even Ray Peat said a little hummus now and then is OK.
                  Homemade perhaps, but most commercial versions use soy/canola in place of olive oil. Not sure which restaurants use.
                  37//6'3"/185

                  My peculiar nutrition glossary and shopping list

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                    Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                    It can be, but is it, in a restaurant setting?
                    In my opinion, recipes are as traditional in restaurants as they are at home, at least in Persian restaurants. Persians are immensely proud of their traditions and culture, and food is no exception.
                    I started the 'mecca of middle eastern foods' thread a while ago, so if you're curious to know what goes in some of the more popular dishes, it's worth a look.
                    That doesn't sound promising.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                      That doesn't sound promising.
                      Then don't eat it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jenry Hennings View Post
                        Then don't eat it.
                        If it's going to take a major research project to get the information I need to make that decision, then I wouldn't bother, no.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                          If it's going to take a major research project to get the information I need to make that decision, then I wouldn't bother, no.
                          It's an eating experience, not a science project.

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