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  • You Shower too Much?

    MSN Entertainment -
    Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

  • #2
    I agree. I learned this at a young age when I would go into the shower looking tanned and healthy, and I'd come out looking pale and feeling dry. My sweaty clothes smell bad, but my sweaty body in clean clothes has never smelled bad. And really, most bad B.O. is directly because of your anus. I've never had a problem there either, so I can only hypothesize. Do people have turds stuck halfway down their anal cavities? Do people not wipe well enough?

    I don't shower very often, but I take steps to stay clean...
    1. Saunas are the best cleaners. If I ever need a deep clean, I go to my gym's sauna. Wipe your skin as it heats up to strip all the bad stuff along with the dead skin it's attached to.
    2. Natural antibiotic salves are your friend. You can put them on anything from athlete's foot to acne. Even just 100% coconut oil is a decent thing to use. You don't have to worry about side effects unless you're allergic.
    3. Moisturizer. I rarely use it. In fact, I mostly use it after taking an occasional soapy shower. I'll only take soapy showers when I've been through some really dirty stuff. But I don't work as a garbage man or toilet cleaner for a living, and chances are you don't either! It's not a frequent occurrence. Again, coconut oil works nicely in a pinch. A nice lubricant too, I might add.
    4. Hand soap. I keep the hands clean with Dr. Bronners.
    5. Showering. When I do, I use a couple wash cloths. Usually no soap and never any shampoo. Occasional soap on your hair will not kill it.
    6. Bidets. I highly recommend these over just using toilet paper. It's a lot cleaner (health-wise and smell-wise), and it even saves some trees.

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    • #3
      Poetic?
      Would I be putting a grain-feed cow on a fad diet if I took it out of the feedlot and put it on pasture eating the grass nature intended?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DrHackenbush View Post
        And really, most bad B.O. is directly because of your anus.

        how many smelly anuses do you get close to each day? just. ew.
        As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

        – Ernest Hemingway

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
          how many smelly anuses do you get close to each day? just. ew.
          I have cats, so more anuses in my face than I'd like...

          I'd say a lot of b.o. is caused by armpits, sweat glands, and low quality diets... Healthy sweat (from someone that eats a low-toxin diet and doesn't take drugs [prescription or otherwise]) that's not getting stuck in crevasses doesn't really smell, but I don't know a whole lot of people that fit that description.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
            how many smelly anuses do you get close to each day? just. ew.
            I have a good sense of smell. I can smell people 10 feet away if they have that IBS (assuming that's what it is) perma-poop smell. I had a girlfriend who wore cocoa butter, and I could smell her from my 2nd story apartment when she walked up to the 1st story door.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by PrimalMama View Post
              I have cats, so more anuses in my face than I'd like...

              I'd say a lot of b.o. is caused by armpits, sweat glands, and low quality diets... Healthy sweat (from someone that eats a low-toxin diet and doesn't take drugs [prescription or otherwise]) that's not getting stuck in crevasses doesn't really smell, but I don't know a whole lot of people that fit that description.
              Sweat has no smell. The smell comes from stuff that can grow after the sweat is there. This means clothes and possibly your skin if you have shitty skin. I'm not exactly an expert on this topic... But still, I think if you had a growth on your body, it would be a visible rash. So can your naked body smell due to sweat without having any rashes? I don't think so. Maybe a little.

              Can diet really affect sweat? I don't really know how true that is. It seems like pseudoscience. Your sweat is just saltwater, is it not?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by DrHackenbush View Post
                Sweat has no smell. The smell comes from stuff that can grow after the sweat is there. This means clothes and possibly your skin if you have shitty skin. I'm not exactly an expert on this topic... But still, I think if you had a growth on your body, it would be a visible rash. So can your naked body smell due to sweat without having any rashes? I don't think so. Maybe a little.

                Can diet really affect sweat? I don't really know how true that is. It seems like pseudoscience. Your sweat is just saltwater, is it not?
                No it's not. It's a combo of water, salts and oils.
                Your body can also excrete toxins this way as well.
                If a person has a poor diet their sweat can smell before bacteria is added (or even a smell about them, without adding sweat)
                You don't need a rash for sweat to smell, not all bacterias cause skin irritation.

                Sent from my HTC_PN071 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hannakb View Post
                  No it's not. It's a combo of water, salts and oils.
                  Your body can also excrete toxins this way as well.
                  If a person has a poor diet their sweat can smell before bacteria is added (or even a smell about them, without adding sweat)
                  You don't need a rash for sweat to smell, not all bacterias cause skin irritation.

                  Sent from my HTC_PN071 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
                  "Toxin" is thrown around way too much. Here's an article on sweat:

                  Discovery Health "Does sweating cleanse your system?"

                  All sweat contains the same primary ingredients: mostly water, some sodium and chloride, and to a lesser extent, potassium. Though you do lose electrolytes when you sweat, perspiration contains only trace amounts of any type of toxins.
                  I'm still skeptical of what they classify as toxin.
                  Is it a heavy metal?
                  An indigestible saccharide (sugar, starch, or fiber)?
                  An indigestible protein?
                  An indigestible fatty acid?
                  Venom from a snake bite?
                  A pesticide?
                  Mucus from an immune response?

                  "Toxins" are one of the boogeymen that even "Primal" people seem to fear irrationally.

                  Here's a better article:

                  http://articles.latimes.com/2008/jan...h/he-skeptic28

                  The products: We all carry the residue of modern living deep within our bodies. We get mercury from fish, pesticides from apples and polyvinyl chlorides from that "new-car smell." A 2005 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study of more than 2,000 people across the country found traces of more than 60 toxic compounds, including such nasty stuff as dioxins and uranium, in the blood and urine of participants. As the CDC noted then, nobody really knows what -- if anything -- these substances are doing to our bodies. But plenty of people are eager to get rid of them.
                  The bottom line: Sweat does contain trace amounts of toxins, says Dr. Dee Anna Glaser, a professor of dermatology at St. Louis University and founding member of the International Hyperhidrosis Society, a medical group dedicated to the study and treatment of heavy sweating.

                  But, Glaser, adds, in the big picture, sweat has only one function: Cooling you down when you overheat. "Sweating for the sake of sweating has no benefits," she says. "Sweating heavily is not going to release a lot of toxins."

                  In fact, Glaser says, heavy sweating can impair your body's natural detoxification system. As she explains, the liver and kidneys -- not the sweat glands -- are the organs we count on to filter toxins from our blood. If you don't drink enough water to compensate for a good sweat, dehydration could stress the kidneys and keep them from doing their job. "If you're not careful, heavy sweating can be a bad thing," she says.
                  Last edited by DrHackenbush; 02-08-2014, 06:34 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                    how many smelly anuses do you get close to each day? just. ew.
                    Originally posted by DrHackenbush View Post
                    I have a good sense of smell. I can smell people 10 feet away if they have that IBS (assuming that's what it is) perma-poop smell. I had a girlfriend who wore cocoa butter, and I could smell her from my 2nd story apartment when she walked up to the 1st story door.
                    i have been working as a sommelier almost 2 decades. my sense of smell staggers my friends and co-workers. my b/f calls me his "canary in the coal mine." but tbh, i don't smell poopy people all that much.
                    As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                    – Ernest Hemingway

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DrHackenbush View Post
                      ...

                      Can diet really affect sweat? I don't really know how true that is. It seems like pseudoscience. Your sweat is just saltwater, is it not?
                      Originally posted by DrHackenbush View Post
                      I'm not exactly an expert on this topic
                      clearly.
                      As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                      – Ernest Hemingway

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
                        clearly.
                        Check out that last article that I posted.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Toxin really isn't all that hard to define. Its just that the category is so large and we have polluted our air, food, water, soil and home with so many of them that I literally have a 28 page list of well known toxic substances many come into contact with all to frequently and in significant amounts to be detrimental to health. Here is a single category as an example:

                          Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine Society has stated that ”the evidence for adverse reproductive outcomes (infertility, cancers, malformations) from exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals is strong, and there is mounting evidence for effects on other endocrine systems, including thyroid, neuroendocrine, obesity, and metabolism, and insulin and glucose homeostasis”.

                          The group of molecules identified as endocrine disruptors includes the following:
                          Industrial solvents /lubricants and their byproducts
                          - Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
                          - Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs)
                          - Dioxins
                          Plastics
                          - Bisphenol A (BPA)
                          Plasticizers
                          - Phthalates
                          Pesticides
                          - Methoxychlor
                          - Chlorpyrifos
                          - Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)
                          Fungicides
                          - Vinclozolin
                          Pharmaceutical agents
                          - Diethylstilbestrol (DES)
                          Phytoestrogens
                          - Genistien
                          - Coumestrol

                          As to what causes BO what bacteria populating the skin is my understanding. And yes it has a lot to do with diet, lifestyle, and general health.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Neckhammer View Post
                            Toxin really isn't all that hard to define. Its just that the category is so large and we have polluted our air, food, water, soil and home with so many of them that I literally have a 28 page list of well known toxic substances many come into contact with all to frequently and in significant amounts to be detrimental to health. Here is a single category as an example:

                            Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine Society has stated that ”the evidence for adverse reproductive outcomes (infertility, cancers, malformations) from exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals is strong, and there is mounting evidence for effects on other endocrine systems, including thyroid, neuroendocrine, obesity, and metabolism, and insulin and glucose homeostasis”.

                            The group of molecules identified as endocrine disruptors includes the following:
                            Industrial solvents /lubricants and their byproducts
                            - Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
                            - Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs)
                            - Dioxins
                            Plastics
                            - Bisphenol A (BPA)
                            Plasticizers
                            - Phthalates
                            Pesticides
                            - Methoxychlor
                            - Chlorpyrifos
                            - Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT)
                            Fungicides
                            - Vinclozolin
                            Pharmaceutical agents
                            - Diethylstilbestrol (DES)
                            Phytoestrogens
                            - Genistien
                            - Coumestrol

                            As to what causes BO what bacteria populating the skin is my understanding. And yes it has a lot to do with diet, lifestyle, and general health.
                            I'm still not following you. BO (the type we're talking about) is due to bacteria on the skin, but sweat is mostly saltwater with a tiny bit of toxin in it. And even then, those toxins are not likely to cause particular bacterial colonies, right? I'm not seeing the direct diet causation. I can go with a diet, lifestyle, and health correlation because these things indicate care for the body, so they probably wear clean clothes and clean themselves well when necessary.

                            I agree that use of these toxins should be reduced or eliminated, so as to prevent contamination in our bodies. But how do we know exactly how much they affect us, what our limits are on these chemicals, and how to remove them? I don't think we have clear answers to any of those questions, save for perhaps a few chemicals. Mostly, we need to have public interests come before private interests by doing the proper research and regulation.
                            Last edited by DrHackenbush; 02-08-2014, 07:07 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by DrHackenbush View Post
                              I'm still not following you. BO (the type we're talking about) is due to bacteria on the skin, but sweat is mostly saltwater with a tiny bit of toxin in it. And even then, those toxins are not likely to cause particular bacterial colonies, right? I'm not seeing the direct diet causation. I can go with a diet, lifestyle, and health correlation because these things indicate care for the body, so they probably wear clean clothes and clean themselves well when necessary.

                              I agree that use of these toxins should be reduced or eliminated, so as to prevent contamination in our bodies. But how do we know exactly how much they affect us, what our limits are on these chemicals, and how to remove them? I don't think we have clear answers to any of those questions, save for perhaps a few chemicals. Mostly, we need to have public interests come before private interests by doing the proper research and regulation.
                              Ah, I see why you are not following. I'm not attributing BO to toxins being secreted at all. The aside about toxins was simply to point out that they are not some unidentifiable boogeyman concept. Actually there is quite a lot known about these various toxins. There are even some ways to test for them directly to determine if one has accumulated significant doses. When lacking that there are proxies like clearance tests to determine if certain enzyme and pathways are working sufficiently. The thing about what you are asking "exact amounts to determine effect"....well that is going to be nigh on impossible to determine due to each and every individual having a different tolerance level to various toxins AND the millions of combinations of toxins that there are. A single toxin may be easy enough to determine, but now you have to cross that and test that singular one with this other one and this one and this one.....its exponential. Look into a concept called allostatic load. I think its probably the best model to use when considering environmental toxins. Anyhow back to BO... the skin flora is much like the gut biome from my understanding. Both can shift and change in response to different lifestyle choices and exposures. I really don't think that this is a very contentious opinion to hold. It seems logical to me. But I'm not a dermatologist either

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