Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tribute To The Scottish Amongst Us

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3VwX-649ye8&feature=kp
    I like badgers, books and booze, more or less in that order.

    Comment


    • #47
      Here's Steve Hackett playing the Skye Boat Song:

      Comment


      • #48
        Here's Jed Marum again, playing the Scottish folktune that's usually used for the "Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond" but here used with an Irish song called "Red is the Rose":




        Another Scottish folksong I just remembered -- "Barbara Allen". Here's a version sang by German counter-tenor Andreas Scholl:

        Last edited by Lewis; 06-10-2014, 11:14 AM.

        Comment


        • #49
          Surely we haven't finished with Scottish folksongs yet.

          Here's Steeleye Span singing an old song about a newly married Galloway lass whose seafaring husband is drowned at sea.

          Comment


          • #50
            No, I'm sure we haven't, but I've a lot of catching up to do with everyone's contributions. Thanks to everyone. Just listened to the Steeleye Span song-very good. I guess I'll work my way backwards. In any case, here is ano S-eye Span tune I like:



            It's too bad an American like me appreciates these things (seemingly) more than the Scots on this forum? Or is the grass always greener on the other side?
            Last edited by Terry H; 06-11-2014, 04:47 PM.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by Terry H View Post
              NIn any case, here is ano S-eye Span tune I like:
              Yeah, that's good. That one seems to be an English folksong:

              All Things Are Quite Silent (Roud 2532)

              Her husband's been press-ganged. I think there's a version of the Scottish folksong "The Lowlands of Holland" that I posted earlier in the thread where that happens, too.

              It's too bad an American like me appreciates these things (seemingly) more than the Scots on this forum? Or is the grass always greener on the other side?
              LOL

              Talking of Americans, the British Navy used to be an equal-opportunities press-ganger and at one time as well as snatching Britons would impress Americans when they came within its grasp -- or, at least, would any likely sailor they considered a British citizen whether he considered he'd emigrated or not. It comes up in the Aubrey-Maturin novels occasionally -- you remember the film?

              Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

              The Royal Navy dropped impressment in 1814. Quite shocking what could happen only a couple of hundred years ago.

              Sometimes I think we don't realise how late arriving, how limited in geographical scope, and perhaps how fragile, the kind of conditions we currently enjoy are. They're not the norm: it just seems so to people who know nothing else.

              Here's another folksong from Phil Anderson that has to do with another sinister feature of the past -- transportation for violation of the stringent game laws. This one seems, again, to be English, but comes here in an Irish version. Steeleye Span also do a version of this but to another tune. Phil Anderson, if my ears don't deceive me, is using the old English folktune "Dives and Lazarus", which I think works well.

              Come all ye gallant poachers that ramble void of care,
              That walk out on a moonlight night with your dog, your gun and snare.
              The hare and lofty pheasant you have at your command,
              Not thinking of your last career upon Van Diemen’s Land.

              Poor Thomas Brown from Nenagh town, Jack Murphy and poor Joe
              Were three determined poachers as the county well does know.
              By the keepers of the land, my boys, one night they were trepanned
              And for fourteen years transported unto Van Diemen’s Land.

              The first day that we landed upon that fatal shore
              The planters came around us, there might be twenty score.
              They ranked us off like horses, and they sold us out of hand,
              And yoked us to the plough, brave boys, to plough Van Diemen’s Land.

              The cottages we live in are built with sods of clay;
              We have rotten straw for bedding, but we dare not say nay.
              Our cots we fence with firing, and slumber when we can
              To keep the wolves and tigers from us in Van Diemen’s Land.

              Oft times when I do slumber, I have a pleasant dream
              With my sweet girl sitting near me close to a purling stream.
              I am going through old Ireland with my true love by the hand,
              But awaken broken-hearted upon Van Diemen’s Land.

              Oh, if I had a thousand pounds all laid out in my hand,
              I’d give it all for liberty, if that I could command.
              Again to Ireland I’d return and be a happy man
              And bid farewell to poaching and to Van Diemen’s Land.

              Comment


              • #52
                The Royal Navy dropped impressment in 1814. Quite shocking what could happen only a couple of hundred years ago.

                Sometimes I think we don't realise how late arriving, how limited in geographical scope, and perhaps how fragile, the kind of conditions we currently enjoy are. They're not the norm: it just seems so to people who know nothing else.
                Great observation Lewis. I am just a pretty average feller, but I think the same. It has taken me longer than it shd. have ( to everything there is a season) to come to this perspective.

                Yeah, that's good. That one seems to be an English folksong:

                All Things Are Quite Silent (Roud 2532)

                Her husband's been press-ganged. I think there's a version of the Scottish folksong "The Lowlands of Holland" that I posted earlier in the thread where that happens, too.
                It's been about 15 yrs ago, but i heard an acapella version of this somewhere, and was moving.
                Talking of Americans, the British Navy used to be an equal-opportunities press-ganger and at one time as well as snatching Britons would impress Americans when they came within its grasp -- or, at least, would any likely sailor they considered a British citizen whether he considered he'd emigrated or not. It comes up in the Aubrey-Maturin novels occasionally -- you remember the film?

                Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

                The Royal Navy dropped impressment in 1814. Quite shocking what could happen only a couple of hundred years ago.
                Yep. My kids and I thoroughly enjoyed....

                Here's another folksong from Phil Anderson that has to do with another sinister feature of the past -- transportation for violation of the stringent game laws. This one seems, again, to be English, but comes here in an Irish version. Steeleye Span also do a version of this but to another tune. Phil Anderson, if my ears don't deceive me, is using the old English folktune "Dives and Lazarus", which I think works well.
                i think so too. Great contribution. I didn't know this one till now.
                Last edited by Terry H; 06-12-2014, 07:59 PM.

                Comment


                • #53

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X