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Girls as young as 9 going through puberty????

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  • #31
    Julia, not to worry. My mom was the consummate drama queen about everything except menopause. Basically one day she said, "Is it hot in here?" and that was it. LOL. Mine was a little rougher, but certainly not a trauma. So, if your mom's was easy, yours might very well be a breeze. Enjoy the Red Death while you can.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    • #32
      It makes perfect sense to me that when girls have a little more body fat they start menses early - it is a signal that food is plentiful and offspring should survive. The inverse is also true, that underweight women can have later onset of menses. Like most things, it is a combination of genes and environment.

      I started my period at 9 or 10 in the early 80's. I wasn't overweight. My classmates started around 10-13 years.

      I don't discount the environmental estrogens as having an impact, but large it is probably a result of higher body fat at an early age.
      Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

      http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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      • #33
        Originally posted by ryanmercer View Post
        1830's was when the industrial revolution was 'completing' around the civilized world. Lots of coal being burnt so mercury levels increasing the world around from the coal ash (and other heavy metals) plus processed foods starting to appear more (canning started around 1809-1812 in France/UK/US and picked up steam over the next four decades) so people in urban areas started to eat less fresh food and more canned food. Move into the early 1900's for WWI and you started to see a lot of calorie dense crap essentially getting canned for the war.
        This is true but the chemicals that we are exposed to have changed over the last 180 years has changed. I doubt many children today have heavy metal accumulation, however children 100 years ago probably weren't exposed to lots of BPA.
        http://lifemutt.blogspot.sg/ - Gaming, Food Reviews and Life in Singapore

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        • #34
          Originally posted by jammies View Post
          It makes perfect sense to me that when girls have a little more body fat they start menses early - it is a signal that food is plentiful and offspring should survive. The inverse is also true, that underweight women can have later onset of menses. Like most things, it is a combination of genes and environment.

          I started my period at 9 or 10 in the early 80's. I wasn't overweight. My classmates started around 10-13 years.

          I don't discount the environmental estrogens as having an impact, but large it is probably a result of higher body fat at an early age.
          I started at 11. I was always told I was fat. Looking at pictures from back then I now know I was not fat. I was very developed, but not fat. I'll be 57 next month and am still having periods.

          My twin daughters have always been thin(except at birth). One is always being asked if she is anorexic--she's not. She started at 12, weighing under 80 lbs. Her twin, slightly heavier, didn't start until she was almost 15.

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          • #35
            That is very interesting about your twins. It seems to go against some of our assumptions connecting weight and onset of periods. There must be other factors.

            Now your comment has made me wonder about when periods might stop?
            Annie Ups the Ante
            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

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            • #36
              Originally posted by marcadav View Post
              I started at 11. I was always told I was fat. Looking at pictures from back then I now know I was not fat. I was very developed, but not fat. I'll be 57 next month and am still having periods.

              My twin daughters have always been thin(except at birth). One is always being asked if she is anorexic--she's not. She started at 12, weighing under 80 lbs. Her twin, slightly heavier, didn't start until she was almost 15.
              Now that is full on weird.

              M.

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              • #37
                For people who want to discount the role of endocrine disrupters in favor of fatness (and I don't know the percentages, but like many things BSed over, there is probably some actual science out there on the topic), I would point out the steady decreasing of the anogential gap in boys (the distance between the genitals and the anus). This is at birth, so no confounding of the child's fat here (though tis true there is a relation to mother and maternal grandmother’s fat).
                “In God we trust; all others must bring data.” W. Edwards Deming
                Blogging at http://loafingcactus.com

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
                  Now that is full on weird.

                  M.
                  not if they are fraternal twins. if they are fraternal, they are no 'different' than my sisters and i. we all started at different times. now if they are identical twins, then yeah…that is interesting indeed.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by dazygyrl View Post
                    not if they are fraternal twins. if they are fraternal, they are no 'different' than my sisters and i. we all started at different times. now if they are identical twins, then yeah…that is interesting indeed.
                    Even if identical twins it's not interesting. Identical twins aren't identical especially as each cell in their body gets replaced. Genes CAN change from environmental factors... FD&C Red No. 40/Allura Red/Red 40 for example is suspected to cause various cellular damage including DNA damage ( here is a paper about it and 2 other dyes causing DNA damage ), free radicals and even environmental radiation exposure can cause similar damage in the DNA of an organism, DNA damage can mean a replicated cell isn't the same, gene expressions can get changed over time this way in an organism. You can take 2 identical twins raised in the same household and they'll vary wildly in interests and personalities more oft than not.
                    -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Annieh View Post
                      That is very interesting about your twins. It seems to go against some of our assumptions connecting weight and onset of periods. There must be other factors.

                      Now your comment has made me wonder about when periods might stop?
                      Right before my girls turn 12 they had a physical. The doctor said they wouldn't start their periods until they weighed around 100lbs.

                      If that doctor had been right about needing to be around 100 lbs to start their periods, my one daughter still would not be having them. My girls are 23, btw.

                      I also wonder when mine will stop. I can't go by family history because my mom had a hysterectomy at 42. So have 3 of my sisters. The other 2 sisters have had ablations.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by dazygyrl View Post
                        not if they are fraternal twins. if they are fraternal, they are no 'different' than my sisters and i. we all started at different times. now if they are identical twins, then yeah…that is interesting indeed.
                        My girls are fraternal twins.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                          Julia, not to worry. My mom was the consummate drama queen about everything except menopause. Basically one day she said, "Is it hot in here?" and that was it. LOL. Mine was a little rougher, but certainly not a trauma. So, if your mom's was easy, yours might very well be a breeze. Enjoy the Red Death while you can.
                          Well THANKS Joanie!

                          Ha, ha, ha, no one said my mother's was easy, and if I didn't know better, I'd say she was
                          still going through it at 71. Bwahahahahaha!

                          Naw, not really, but man that woman feels so entitled about EVERYTHING. And it's just not
                          Old Person Entitlement. She's allllllways been like that. All 98lbs of her.

                          Enjoy Red Death? ENJOY IT?!?!?!? At least I could use it as a "PHEW! NOT PREGNANT! THANK GOD!"
                          when I gave 26 shits about going to the boneyard, but now I don't and it's a complete and utter
                          disgusting nuisance that needs to stop STAT.

                          That's it. I'm taking my uterus out THIS INSTANT.

                          Hope I can find my "nook and cranny" slim vacuum cleaner attachment.....

                          If you don't hear from me in 3hrs, I've just plain bled to death.... alone.

                          ~Anonymous

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by loafingcactus View Post
                            For people who want to discount the role of endocrine disrupters in favor of fatness (and I don't know the percentages, but like many things BSed over, there is probably some actual science out there on the topic), I would point out the steady decreasing of the anogential gap in boys (the distance between the genitals and the anus). This is at birth, so no confounding of the child's fat here (though tis true there is a relation to mother and maternal grandmother’s fat).
                            The anogenital gap is an interesting comment. I don't know what it means though in reality. Does it mean boys are producing less testosterone? Is there anything (as a future father) that I can do know to help with this issue? Do I have anything to do with it and what can my wife do?

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Iron Will View Post
                              The anogenital gap is an interesting comment. I don't know what it means though in reality. Does it mean boys are producing less testosterone? Is there anything (as a future father) that I can do know to help with this issue? Do I have anything to do with it and what can my wife do?
                              *now

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                              • #45
                                I grew up on large cattle ranches in the 70's and 80's. Most ranches then did NOT use the growth hormones for beef that came about in the later 80's and 90's - no one had the money and bred the cattle for desirable traits. Most of the kids on the neighboring ranches were really active and well fed - we all grew much of our own food as it was too far to get to the grocery often - we went 1x per month! Most of my friends and I all started menstruating by 9 or 10. One friend's sister was 14 and her mother worried so that she took her to a doctor - everyone knew in our close knit, albeit far flung community! Of course the girl was fine, but that was our lifestyle in rural NW USA... My daughters (adopted) are 12 and 14 and haven't started yet and they came from the SW and different background

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