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  • #46
    I'm still wearing a T-shirt and we have frost. I hope that counts for something.
    Crohn's, doing SCD

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    • #47
      I've been wearing a t-shirt everywhere. One thing I have noticed is that I don't need as many blankets at night.

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      • #48
        Next question: how cold is too cold? My core was extremely warm, but my arms were cold and had goosebumps, but the muscles felt tight and my hands were cold and stiff-like. No shivering though.

        Thoughts?

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Primal_BK View Post
          Next question: how cold is too cold? My core was extremely warm, but my arms were cold and had goosebumps, but the muscles felt tight and my hands were cold and stiff-like. No shivering though.

          Thoughts?
          I wouldn't get colder than that, especially extremities. I managed to get reynaulds disease from working in the snow and it really is a bitch. Hands become far too pale for a hand still alive, and immovable at about 7degrees C and less.

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          • #50
            I am continuing with CT training, however, I feel like I am becoming more sensitive to heat. I find that when sleeping I need to kick off the blankets in the middle of the night due to excessive heat. Anybody else experience this?

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            • #51
              Fun topic, lets revive it!

              Originally posted by AMonkey View Post
              How much of cold tolerance is genetic, how much is adaptation and how much is simply diet?

              For instance I am half Scottish and grew up in Scotland. I regularly went outside with minimal clothing, for instance only wearing a shirt in under 10 C weather. I'm in Singapore now and I notice that my skin is often warmer than my friends, especially noticeable when coming out of AC, there's tends to be cold where as I'm warm.

              I've done exercise most of my life and been on a 'high' carb, sustainable calories diet. So how much do all these factors play? For instance people that are calorie restricting tend to feel colder.
              I don't think genetics are everything. When I was a little kid, I used to be able to go outside in t-shirt when the temperature was creeping down to freezing point and not feel very cold. I got rant upon rant from my mom about doing that, by the way :P
              Buuuut as the years passed by and I grew older, I lost that. This was before I changed my diet from SAD to paleo, so diet should not be the whole story. However, I think the main impact was the fact that I stopped playing around, the closest thing I came to exercise, and replaced outdoor life with a computer instead. There might be a genetic factor too of course - my grandfather was very warm no matter what, and I could place a hand on his arm when the rest of us were huddled up in jackets and he'd feel like a heater...

              But based solely on personal experience, I'd say that cold resistance depends on 1) physical exercise, 2) practice your tolerance, actually being outside, and lastly, 3) , genetics.

              Let me share a little mindfullness exercise that I find useful for practicing cold resistance. Sit or lie down in a cool room and just relax. Take some time to relax your muscles, calm your breath, sit comfortably. The room should be cool enough for you to feel it on your skin and have goosebumps.
              Then, without shuddering, try to feel your own body temperature. It should feel warmer at the core, cooler at the skin level. Observe your body's response to the outside temperature. Will you feel the gradual temperature change in the different parts of the body, the different layers of muscle, your body sending out heat in reaction? Give it a shot, it's really interesting!

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              • #52
                I live in Southern California.

                When other people move here what usually happens is that in winter time they will have the window open, be wearing flip-flops and shorts and everybody can just tell hey, you're from Minnesota, aren't you?

                After 1 year, they close the windows but maybe they're still wearing the flip-flops.

                The 2nd year, they're just like the rest of us. It's 60 degrees out. Brr, it's freezing out there. Maybe they don't have their down jackets out just yet, but they're probably wearing a hoodie. If they're female, they probably have a space heater plugged in under their desk.
                Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                • #53
                  It dropped down around freezing last night. This morning, I wore a lightweight long-sleeved t-shirt under the polo shirt I wear for my volunteer gig--but once I got a couple of blocks from the house and started to warm up I realized I could have done just as well without it. I ended up pushing the sleeves up as I walked. And once again, I noticed that when you are radically underdressed for the weather, people will avoid sitting next to you on the bus (an unexpected benefit).

                  While walking from the bus to where I volunteer, I passed an elderly lady and her preschooler (great-)grandson, both bundled up against the chill. She looked at me in complete amazement and asked me, "Where is your jacket? It's freezing out!" as I passed.

                  Tomorrow, I'm headed to San Francisco for the day, where it will be sunny and in the upper 60s, and tonight I'm scrambling to find summer clothes that look halfway decent. Layering is a fine art as well as a key survival strategy in SF, but I keep looking at the same lightweight cotton cardigan and asking myself, "Do you really need to take that?" and the answer keeps coming back "Hell, no."

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Artemis67 View Post
                    It dropped down around freezing last night. This morning, I wore a lightweight long-sleeved t-shirt under the polo shirt I wear for my volunteer gig--but once I got a couple of blocks from the house and started to warm up I realized I could have done just as well without it. I ended up pushing the sleeves up as I walked. And once again, I noticed that when you are radically underdressed for the weather, people will avoid sitting next to you on the bus (an unexpected benefit).

                    While walking from the bus to where I volunteer, I passed an elderly lady and her preschooler (great-)grandson, both bundled up against the chill. She looked at me in complete amazement and asked me, "Where is your jacket? It's freezing out!" as I passed.

                    Tomorrow, I'm headed to San Francisco for the day, where it will be sunny and in the upper 60s, and tonight I'm scrambling to find summer clothes that look halfway decent. Layering is a fine art as well as a key survival strategy in SF, but I keep looking at the same lightweight cotton cardigan and asking myself, "Do you really need to take that?" and the answer keeps coming back "Hell, no."
                    Was there wind? I can stand cold temperatures, but cannot tolerate wins and cold!

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                    • #55
                      Anybody have thoughts on how CT effects sleep? I've done a lot of searching and can only find the below info.

                      CT leads to deeper and higher quality sleep, meaning those who practice it require less sleep.

                      Thoughts?

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                      • #56
                        I would also be interested to hear opinions on the difference between tolerating being cold in your core (i.e. generating heat) and being cold in your extremities (i.e. circulating heat around the body)

                        I have no problem being a bit chilly all round but my feet do suffer.

                        Also it's not only wind chill that is an issue but damp - I remember a friend flying out of Moscow at -20 C dry, landing in Heathrow at +5 C damp, and saying it felt much much colder, that they felt under-dressed in their Russian winter coat and hat.

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                        • #57
                          When I was hiking the Pacific Crest Trail I went through a segment of the John Muir Trail without much in the way of warm layers to wear while hiking and it was snowing and hailing most days. I was pretty cold. I would just keep moving to stay warm. I kind of got used to feeling uncomfortable, if that makes any sense. When I got to Mammoth I bought a long sleeved shirt at a thrift store and instantly I felt so much more comfortable. The whole thing taught me a huge lesson about discomfort being more of an annoyance than an actual threat to my life.

                          Later along the trail I had sent home my down jacket and had pretty piss-poor rain gear. It was raining and about 45 degrees. If I stopped at all my hands would go numb. All the plants along the trail were drenching me so I could have been in a lot of trouble if I stopped for too long. So I kept moving. Again I got used to just being uncomfortable, wet and cold. I got sick of it, but I learned it was just discomfort, not something worse than that.

                          As long as there is no wind, it turns out that I can actually tolerate quite a lot of cold so long as I can keep moving. If I'm just going to sit there, I'll get cold even sitting in my house (in the cooler months when the heat's not on.) It gets worse the more days I'm inactive (like on a long holiday weekend.)

                          These days just by building more muscle on my body, sprinting and probably from eating more protein, I am a lot warmer than I used to be. If I sit around for a few days, I seem to lose my edge on warmth. But if I keep to my schedule of lifting, sprinting and eating I end up throwing off covers in the night while my boyfriend has a huge zero-degree sleeping bag on top of his side of the bed. I walk around the house barefoot while my boyfriend asks me aren't my feet cold.
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                          • #58
                            As of today, I really noticed the CT kick in. Did a 3.5 mile walk in light sweat pants, hoodie, and light thermal shirt. Minimalist shoes with socks, no gloves. Temp was about 36'-40'F with moderate winds (wind can be a real deal breaker).

                            0-10 minutes in, goosebumps all over, no shivering, body felt slightly tight, hands were kind of pale and very cold. 15 minutes muscles felt relaxed. 20 minutes in, fingers started feeling warm, almost hot, hands regained 100% of color. 26 minutes in, feet started to feel comfortable warm. Hoodie comes off at this point. Over the next 20 minutes I slow my down and enjoy the warmth. Last 15 minutes of the walk the wind really kicked up so the hoodie went back on. Note: all this was with walking, nothing faster.

                            Currently inside, my hands and feet are extremely hot feeling, rest of the body feels completely relaxed.

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                            • #59
                              I tend to built up a pretty strong cold tolerance in the winter, so right about now it is kicking in.....my ancestors were Finnish on one side, the other French Canadian going back in the same area I am now since before the founding of the US.

                              Most mornings when I wake up lately, it is around 50-55 in my house. It was 6 degrees outside this morning, so getting it to be 70 inside is not going to happen. I am usually out doing chores for an hour before work, so this builds it up further. The main thing I have learned about the cold is to keep your head REALLY warm. I don't mean a stocking cap....I mean 3 inches of rabbit fur on your head Do that, to where you are losing absolutely nothing through your head, and you can handle a lot.

                              By March, 35 degrees outside feels positively warm. I remember a day last year when I was walking around, barefoot, no shirt, planting seeds, only to realize it was 38 outside at the time (with sun, zero wind). It is all relative. I am miserable in a 74 degree office though, so it has a downside. I keep my office in the low 60's.
                              "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                                I live in Southern California.

                                When other people move here what usually happens is that in winter time they will have the window open, be wearing flip-flops and shorts and everybody can just tell hey, you're from Minnesota, aren't you?

                                After 1 year, they close the windows but maybe they're still wearing the flip-flops.

                                The 2nd year, they're just like the rest of us. It's 60 degrees out. Brr, it's freezing out there. Maybe they don't have their down jackets out just yet, but they're probably wearing a hoodie. If they're female, they probably have a space heater plugged in under their desk.
                                Hey, don't pick on us frozen Minnesotan's!
                                I live in northern MN, and it is a frozen tundra more than it is not. Jan/Feb temps reach 30-40 degrees F below zero. 60 degrees is 100 degrees warmer, and damn right it feels hot! If get a sunny 60 degree day in April, I've shed the clothes and laid out to sun tan!

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