Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Who likes homemade hard apple cider? come on in

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by paint94979 View Post
    Clarity ferm isn't 100% proven and you don't necessarily need high alcohol tolerant yeast just as long as you stay within your estimated abv range.
    True on both points. If I am going to drink craft beer, and I am, gluten reduced is better than not. High gravity Belgian yeast tastes great, allows you to add more fermentable sugars, and produces a dryer, higher alcohol drink. This is not at all necessary, I just prefer it that way. Any brewers yeast should work to some extent. I also added some yeast nutrient and pectic enzyme as recommended by cider making websites.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by paint94979 View Post
      This is my first shot at homemade hard apple cider... I have home brewed beer for years that is until i went Paleo/Primal so my life as had a void in it haha. I went this past tuesday to a local apple orchard and picked up 12 gallons of fresh pressed raw and unfiltered apple juice. Cider requires various steps to kill natural growing yeast, remove the cloudiness and finally pitch(add) the yeast. So here we are roughly 9 hours into primary fermentation. FYI I am fermenting with 2 types of liquid yeast the carboy on the left is White Labs Cider yeast and the carboy or the right is Wyeast Cider yeast. The Wyeast is a quick starter no doubt. Oh by the way this cider is going to finish around 7.2% abv




      Apple Cider Fermentation Test White Labs vs Wyeast - YouTube
      looks great. I've been a home brewer for many years, but haven't ever done a cider before. i'm actually thinking about doing one within the next few weeks. do you have a basic tutorial or set of instructions that I could follow? I've always been interested in using a champagne yeast for a cider, and bottling with maple syrup or even brown sugar.

      Comment


      • #18
        I just read everything I can. Check out homebrewtalk.com is a big forum with a huge dedicated section on ciders. This is my recipe

        Sterilize everything.
        Add 1 crushed campden tablet per gallon to juice and allow to work for 12-24 hours.
        Add .5 tsp of pectic enzyme per gallon and stir. Wait 12 hours
        Pitch your yeast starter(I always make a starter)
        Shake and cover with an airlock.

        Now you can add brown sugar, raw unfiltered honey, white sugar, corn sugar etc whatever you want to bump up SG or to alter the flavor. Maybe some spices like cinnamon and nutmeg? I decided to not add anything for my first time just to make what I hope to be good tasting cider and build from there next year.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Markbt View Post
          True on both points. If I am going to drink craft beer, and I am, gluten reduced is better than not. High gravity Belgian yeast tastes great, allows you to add more fermentable sugars, and produces a dryer, higher alcohol drink. This is not at all necessary, I just prefer it that way. Any brewers yeast should work to some extent. I also added some yeast nutrient and pectic enzyme as recommended by cider making websites.

          Sent from my Nexus 4 using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app
          Great point about the clarity ferm I was being too absolute. I would be really interested to try it out. I don't possess an allergy to gluten but I know its not good for you

          Comment


          • #20
            I didn't use enzymes, acid blend, or campden in this batch. It is currently 5 gallons of unpasteurized cider with 1118 yeast and 5lbs organic wild flower honey. It's approximately 9%ABV and very aromatic at 8 weeks in. Still somewhat cloudy, but that usually disappears after the second transfer.

            Comment


            • #21
              I LOOOVE hard cider. It is, by far, my favorite alcoholic beverage. As it just so happens, I live within walking distance to a great brew pub with ONLY cider on tap and about a hundre options in cold cases. The silver lining to this already fantastic setup is the farm-to-table completely gluten-free restaurant across the street from said pub that delivers. (omg, I may never leave this neighborhood.)

              Our favorites are:

              1. Two Towns Bad Apple. Brewed with meadowfoam honey and possibly magic. #1 in all of mankind.
              2. Finnriver Dry Hopped.
              3. Finnriver Habanero Cider. This is one of my DH's favorites. I never would have tried it if not forced and so glad I did.
              4. Aspall sparkling cider.
              5. Crispin english. For camping only, as it comes in cans. I pretty much hate every other kind they make.
              6. Two Rivers Pink Lady.
              7. Alpenfire Pirate's Plank. Likely the driest cider made. Like paint thinner dry. Quality can vary but the good bottles are really good.
              8. Reverend Nat's. Ginger or Apricot hopped.

              Wow. I guess I like to drink. ha

              Based on what the vast majority serve as hard cider, I thought I didn't like it for years. Most big labels sell something akin to juice gone bad. Turns out there is an amazing world of cider available and it's within stumbling distance of my front door.

              Highly recommend everyone explore this more.

              Comment


              • #22
                I've been thinking about incorporating new flavor into my ciders, particularly hops. How is the dry hopped cider?

                My next batch with probably have some berries added and less honey.

                Comment


                • #23
                  I have a pear tree, it yielded about 150 pears...this has me thinking...What yeast should I use

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I love the cider from the Albemarle Cider Works in North Garden, Virginia, but it's a 6 or so hour drive, so I don't get it much. They use heirloom apples to make their cider. Virginia has had a bunch of cideries pop up in recently years. I also like the ciders from Foggy Ridge - they're near the North Carolina state line, they also use heirloom variety apples.

                    Otherwise, I drink Woodchuck - I like their Granny Smith. Woodchuck has made a cider with maple syrup, but I didn't care for the maple aftertaste. Before that, they did a spring cider with honey, which was delicious with Chinese food. I also like Crispin the Saint.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I love to cook with hard cider. Goes fantastically well with pork, nice in turkey gravy too. Not a big drinker myself, but I remember loving Scrumpy, particularly the cloudy stuff you get out of the vats in the walls in Cornwall/Devon. Not worth me making it for cooking though
                      Started Primal June 2012 at 148.5lbs, and 5' 1", reached goal weight in 5 months.
                      Lowest weight 93lbs - too thin. Now stable at around 100lbs much better weight for me at my age.
                      Primal, minus eggs, dairy and a myriad of other allergens.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I never thought about cooking with it, how do you do it? Do you marinate the meats with it or work it into sauces?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Primal_BK View Post
                          I never thought about cooking with it, how do you do it? Do you marinate the meats with it or work it into sauces?
                          Mainly work into sauces. This has been a family favourite for years Fast Roast Pork with Rosemary and Caramelised Apples - Pork Recipes - Recipes - from Delia Online
                          Also this weekend I did the Thanksgiving turkey from Gordon Ramsay, it had a gravy made using cider to deglaze the pan then reduce, delicious!.
                          Started Primal June 2012 at 148.5lbs, and 5' 1", reached goal weight in 5 months.
                          Lowest weight 93lbs - too thin. Now stable at around 100lbs much better weight for me at my age.
                          Primal, minus eggs, dairy and a myriad of other allergens.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X