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You may be strong but are you tough?

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  • You may be strong but are you tough?

    Excellent article from the Art of Manliness site and it applies to both sexes.

    You May Be Strong . . . But Are You Tough? | The Art of Manliness

    I wrote a post on my blog sometime back about how humans seems to have become "weak and needful things", here to read if your interested.

    Hardcore Mind Blog Archive Weak and needful things

    It is interesting, and disgusting to me to see to what lengths people will go to, to avoid any level of discomfort.

    I'm not talking about pain due to injury here or suffering heat/cold to the point of actual bodily harm. But from comfort foods to comfy chairs, some people seem unable to handle any degree of discomfort.

    When it turns cold, they bundle up to walk the 10 feet to their car, which has likely already been warming up and drive to the store or work, to only rush the few feet to the comfort of another climate controlled environment. Now I have to admit that I do not like the cold and avoid it if possible. Acclimatizing to the cold is something I really have to work on but I can and have done it.

    I have seen people wait for a parking place two spaces closer to the door of the store, just to avoid the additional walking of, perhaps, 15 feet. Disgusting.

    One of my favorite quotes came from a martial arts teacher of a friend of mine who said...

    Get comfortable with being uncomfortable
    Wise words indeed and one of the first steps towards developing toughness.

    And toughness is not the same as physical strength. One of the toughest people that I have heard of is Stephen Hawking. To be in the physical condition he is in and still contribute his brilliance to the world is a strong statement on how mentally tough he is. And I also admire his sense of humor, his voice and cartoon character, as been featured on Family Guy several times.

    Toughness, IMHO, is much more important than physical strength. In an emergency, a strong will or toughness will win out over some muscle bound person that melts down when the going gets rough.

    Randal
    AKA: Texas Grok

    Originally posted by texas.grok
    Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
    http://hardcoremind.com/

  • #2
    I have read a few "survival" skills authors, and they all say the same thing.... that mental toughness is the most important factor in surviving bad situations. The same holds true in every day life. Mental toughness is far more important than how much you can benchpress...

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    • #3
      I don't think it is about "being comfortable" because "comfortable" is a feeling, a direct experience, that depends on the individual's reality. I'd rather say that people tend to seek being CUSHIONED, everything has to give that impression of security, safety whereby you can both satisfy the principle of least action AND derive a sense of entitlement.

      I will read the article, looks interesting ...

      Comment


      • #4
        In my yoga classes, I teach people to "become comfortable with discomfort" (a take on your martial arts teacher's saying).

        And yes, I'm tough. Tougher than most people expect. I work on achieving True Grit. I'm averaging about 67.43% TG right now, probably.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by zoebird View Post
          In my yoga classes, I teach people to "become comfortable with discomfort" (a take on your martial arts teacher's saying).

          And yes, I'm tough. Tougher than most people expect. I work on achieving True Grit. I'm averaging about 67.43% TG right now, probably.
          Ok, I have to ask. How do you measure TG? Is there a special instrument for that?
          Randal
          AKA: Texas Grok

          Originally posted by texas.grok
          Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
          http://hardcoremind.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Try living with $1 a day in China or India for a month.
            We will talk about courage, toughness, mental strength, etc.
            Few but ripe.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 70in2012 View Post
              Try living with $1 a day in China or India for a month.
              We will talk about courage, toughness, mental strength, etc.
              So far I have worked in 14 different countries, mostly 3rd world/developing countries and you are exactly right.

              Being tough and being poor are two things people around the world live with daily. Being tough is nothing they have to develop, it is a way of life.

              The so-called "poor" in the USA live like kings compared to a lot of people.

              That being said, I have said before that a lot of people didn't realize they were "poor" until Western civilization came in and told them they were poor.

              With TV and movies, people are being told that they aren't shit unless they have Coke, Levi's and the latest, greatest star endorsed fashion.
              Randal
              AKA: Texas Grok

              Originally posted by texas.grok
              Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
              http://hardcoremind.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                i'm tough enough on most things, but when it's 30 outside i'll be wearing a coat to climb in my heated car to drive to the store to walk the 15 feet to the door

                i don't even care. that level of cold is painful.

                unless you're with another adult doing adult activities out in the cold. then it's less noticeable.
                beautiful
                yeah you are

                Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
                lol

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bloodorchid View Post
                  i'm tough enough on most things, but when it's 30 outside i'll be wearing a coat to climb in my heated car to drive to the store to walk the 15 feet to the door

                  i don't even care. that level of cold is painful.

                  unless you're with another adult doing adult activities out in the cold. then it's less noticeable.
                  Like a complete idiot, I took a job on a drilling rig in Northern Russia. Above the Arctic Circle. In February. I was supposed to work 28 days on/28 days off. It was 50 below when I left, never went back.

                  30 degrees I can handled for short periods barefoot and no coat. 50 below was just beyond insane. My brain was freezing, I could not complete a thought.

                  Never again.....
                  Randal
                  AKA: Texas Grok

                  Originally posted by texas.grok
                  Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
                  http://hardcoremind.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    and that is the point i'd pitch a fit and cry like a baby til i got back home
                    beautiful
                    yeah you are

                    Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
                    lol

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I enjoyed that a distinction is made between strength and toughness....too many men act as if lifting a lot of weight makes them tough. It doesn't. It makes your muscles bigger. Toughness is earned, and actually pretty rare.

                      One of the lessons I think it takes maturity to learn is that, in many cases, there is something to be gained in making something HARDER. Too much luxury, too much coddling makes one soft....and being soft makes you bitch about things, even internally, that are not important. Softness makes you lose perspective.

                      In my own life, I try to keep all things like this in balance. There has to be areas of softness and firmness in life, easy and hard, advanced and primitive....

                      My job, for example, is heavy in coddling me. I work in perfect temp control, in a shirt and tie, on computers or talking to patients. I get to park right in front of the building, short walk, etc. The work is cerebral to the max, no physicality, no fatigue in the muscles at the end of the day.

                      Which is what makes my home, hobbies, other jobs and their function so important.

                      -Home is off-grid, woodstove only, no power but for a few hours at night. It is often cold when I get up in the morning after the fire goes out. This morning I woke up to 39 degrees in my house.
                      -Last Tuesday, I was awoken at 2am to a fire at a neighbor's barn, to which my second job as a volunteer fireman had to come to bear. I rushed out into upper 30's, suited up at the station, then on to doing the most unnatural thing a person can do: walk TOWARDS a building on fire.
                      - My workouts are all chalk, oly lifts,or otherwise hanging weights from my belt and pulling myself around....I am always entertained when patients of mine see me at the gym (it is a huge club) in shorts, vibrams, rugby hat, and covered in chalk....apparently I am not the cleaned up professional all the time?
                      - I have to hunt, chop my own wood, grow a lot of my own food, care for my own animals. A lot of times I am more tired after a Saturday of chores than after a long gym session.

                      All of this is completely necessary to me, psychologically. I need to feel like both parts of me have room to breathe, otherwise I start to go crazy or want to rebel. (When I lived in Miami, I once took a tent, some bouys, and food, and SWAM to an tiny deserted island in the Keys, just to have some "reality" in my life. Hardship and toughness are the real world. Only the civilization blanket keeps it at bay enough, sometimes, to fool people into thinking otherwise.

                      This is probably very abnormal, but I NEED hardship in my life to feel real. If everything were as easy for me as it is for most Americans, I would feel like I am living in a fantasy land that would make me lose touch with myself.
                      "The soul that does not attempt flight; does not notice its chains."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bloodorchid View Post
                        and that is the point i'd pitch a fit and cry like a baby til i got back home
                        I did my 28 days, spent as much time in my bed under a couple of hundred blankets as I could and when I got back to the US, they tried to give me a ticket to go back. I told them they could fire me or reassign me someplace else. They sent me to the Texas Panhandle instead which is the part of Texas that I grew up in, that was fine.

                        I did get a couple of days in Moscow however, that was pretty cool (no pun intended).
                        Randal
                        AKA: Texas Grok

                        Originally posted by texas.grok
                        Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
                        http://hardcoremind.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I am tougher than strong. I may whine and complain a bit, but I walked across the entire state of Washington without a rain jacket and without a down jacket and it was 45 degrees and raining many days. I was cold, wet, miserable, but I always had a mental checklist:

                          - Keep moving, just keep moving.
                          - Am I really in serious danger? No, keep moving.
                          - Am I really that cold? No, keep moving.
                          - What if ___ fails? I can use ___ instead.
                          - I promise myself to go home when I get to the next town (and then I wouldn't.)
                          - If I do 30 miles today and 30 miles tomorrow I will be warm, clean and dry in a comfy bed at a hotel (and then I'd do it.)
                          - As soon as I get to town I will buy a poncho (and then it stopped raining.)

                          I also walked across the entire state of Oregon in July when the mosquitoes were at their worst. I was weak. I used DEET so I could have a little sanity and poop in peace.

                          I did all that alone, by the way.

                          I also hiked in Southern California where it's very windy and cold. I survived a night where I could see stars above but feel rain on my face and with 55 mile an hour winds, it was too windy to set up my tent.

                          I've actually survived many nights of high winds and had my tent completely destroyed. I think having no shelter is actually the worst thing I've dealt with.

                          But damn it, I just can't press more than 62.5lbs over my head.
                          Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                          • #14
                            Youtube is down for me (which is kinda bugging me out because that is following a strange gray blimp flyover) but I wanted to post an audiobook from youtube, a short story, "The Love of Life," by Jack London. That dude is tough and people should hear that shit out.
                            "Ah, those endless forests, and their horror-haunted gloom! For what eternities have I wandered through them, a timid, hunted creature, starting at the least sound, frightened of my own shadow, keyed-up, ever alert and vigilant, ready on the instant to dash away in mad flight for my life. For I was the prey of all manner of fierce life that dwelt in the forest, and it was in ecstasies of fear that I fled before the hunting monsters."

                            Jack london, "Before Adam"

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                            • #15
                              sweet it came back:

                              "Ah, those endless forests, and their horror-haunted gloom! For what eternities have I wandered through them, a timid, hunted creature, starting at the least sound, frightened of my own shadow, keyed-up, ever alert and vigilant, ready on the instant to dash away in mad flight for my life. For I was the prey of all manner of fierce life that dwelt in the forest, and it was in ecstasies of fear that I fled before the hunting monsters."

                              Jack london, "Before Adam"

                              Comment

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