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Would Grokette have been a sorority girl?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Bifcus View Post
    I cannot follow this conversation.

    I take it Greek is not an autocorrect typo for Grok? You pay money to join these clubs, but only if you are of Greek heritage (do other minorities have similar clubs?) that then impose rules on you, like forcing community service? It must be a lot of money if they can buy houses. And there is an implication no-one will be friends with you if you don't belong to their club. That is a lot of effort just to retain links to your cultural heritage. Why not just have friends from all racial backgrounds,surely that would make you a better person.
    It's not a typo. Maybe this is mostly an American thing. Fraternities and Sororities in universities have names w/ Greek letters. Omega, Sigma, whatever (that's not a letter). I don't know what the origins are, but it has nothing to do with heritage now. They're just clubs that you live with, essentially, but with a lot of hazing.
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    • #47
      Originally posted by namelesswonder View Post
      It's not a typo. Maybe this is mostly an American thing. Fraternities and Sororities in universities have names w/ Greek letters. Omega, Sigma, whatever (that's not a letter). I don't know what the origins are, but it has nothing to do with heritage now. They're just clubs that you live with, essentially, but with a lot of hazing.
      I think that is a rather unfair assessment. Much has been done to eliminate hazing and hazing is certainly not limited only to 'Greek' organizations. As for why they are designated with Greek letters, from what I understand and could Google, such clubs were originally named in Latin (to reflect classical education) and when the first Greek letter organization started it was in the same vein - based on a Greek motto (again a reflection of classical education - from wiki: The Greek letters (ΦΒΚ) come from the motto Φιλοσοφία Βίου Κυβερνήτης (philosophia biou kybernētēs, "Philosophy is the helmsman of life"), ). Once it became popular/influential other such organizations followed suit with Greek letter names.

      Fraternities cost money as do Sororities. Many are expensive. It seemed to me that this was for several reasons - they are maintaining a house (where members can live relatively cheaply), they do certain social functions (which are not free), and yes, there is a certain social prestiege - maybe not a full on 'keep out the riff-raff' but it did seem that way at times.

      I was a member of a fraternity. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia - a professional music fraternity. Our dues were cheap ($65 a semester), our functions mainly revolved around music - our 'public service' was more to help out the musical community - recording concerts, setting up shows, small scholarships, that kind of thing. We had no house. The dues paid mainly for administrative costs and for setting up rush events. Was I paying for friends? I never saw it that way. It was a good way to meet cool dudes with similar interests. And, hell, on a Friday night, why not drink too much and roam around campus singing to random women? (btw 2 of my frat brothers met their wives during inebriated singing nights).

      So yes, I guess they are just clubs but they are clubs for a certain purpose. The social frats/sororities do some good, they are also an excellent way to network, and a place to fit in. My university had 50,000+ students. Sure, you can find friends, but it is convenient to have a place to start. Other fraternities/sororities are based around professions be they engineering, music, or business. Some are purely for those of high academic achievement. I think it was Joanie who said it was like joining a small tribe. I agree. I think Grok/ette would not be out of place in such an environment.

      BTW I am still in contact wtih many of my frat brothers 20 years after college. That is pretty good friendship for $65.

      edit - obviously my whole message is not directed at what Nameless wrote. She was just last so was a convenient point of reference.
      Last edited by canio6; 08-22-2013, 07:01 AM.

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      • #48
        Thanks Canio. I was being pretty general and admittedly don't have a good sense of the origins or purpose of these organizations. My university didn't have frats or sororities, so my impressions are basically from cinema.
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        • #49
          Probably depends on what sorority you join and what school you're going to. I never did it, but my sister did and she had a very good experience. On her campus, the sorority house was much, much nicer than the dorm, had better food - and actually had stricter rules than the dorms, i.e. no guys could stay overnight. You got privileges taken away if you didn't keep your GPA up. Of course, she did plenty of partying and drank more than her share of beer, so there's that - but overall, she made a lot of friends and graduated with close to a 4.0. Like anything else, it's what you make of it.

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          • #50
            Thanks Canio and Nameless. I had a vague awareness of the terms fraternity and sorority from watching some US TV, but hadn't realised the latin names thing was part of the culture. I guess the bit I find weird is they sound like a whole lifestyle thing, not just a regular club where you go to meetings every second Tuesday or whatever. In all my years studying or when I worked at a Uni, I never joined a club.

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