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Woman wears corset continually for THREE YEARS. Attains 16" waist...

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  • #31
    Re. Scarlett - it has to do with the rest of your build too. She was quite petite all over. This woman was kind of normal...

    In a strange twist of fate, this article makes me want to try the corset thing..! Obviously she's taken it to the extreme, but I looked up what Jessica Alba did, and three months isn't as insane. I wonder if a week would suffice...

    Jessica Alba Wore a Corset for 3 Months to Get Her Post-Baby Body Back | Shape Magazine
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    • #32
      Great, now I want a corset too. Not to make any extreme changes, but I'd like to shrink my waist by 3 inches. How does it work? Does it cause you to lose fat? Or does it work by causing your abs to atrophy. If so, then that's not really going to work for me. Can't do crossfit without core strength.

      My journal

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      • #33
        Oh Lawd. Please tell me you two aren't that gullible.

        Jessica Alba also has a nutritionist and a personal trainer on staff.

        Corsets "work" by deforming your ribs. They do this to little girls that are in those child beauty contests all dressed up like little barbies.

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        • #34
          Some people wear an underbust corset or a weight-lifting support belt to curb their appetite. I don't know how well that works, but it's probably healthier than bariatric surgery.

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          • #35
            From Jr. High all the way into college I wore my watch *reeeeeeeeally*tight, because I hated having it slide around. I finally made myself stop because I have a visible indent where my watch was. The indent is still there, a good eight years later, (though it is finally lessening...likely due to weight gain in pregnancy, come to think of it...)

            Perhaps my persistent indent was largely because I was developing at the time, but the indent is skin, muscle &/or fat displacement--not bone. So, while I know corsets really do a number on ribs, I'm pretty sure they also affect the distribution of skin, muscle and fat, perhaps even semi-permanently if you wear them long enough, like my watch did to my wrist.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
              Some people wear an underbust corset or a weight-lifting support belt to curb their appetite. I don't know how well that works, but it's probably healthier than bariatric surgery.
              Definitely healthier than bariatric surgery, and perhaps more effective, too. My mother-in-law had to have a large portion of her stomach removed due to ulcers. Everyone kept telling her, "Oh, you'll be so thin now!" Nope, she's still just as heavy. She stretched her stomach back to it's old size, is still drinking soda (though it can severely damage her now because of her surgery), and she has nutrient absorption issues, too, because of the surgery. All in all, it gave her no improvement, and ended up making her less healthy (though without the ulcers, which was the point of the surgery. Of course, if she keeps on eating and living as she does, she'll have those ulcers back pretty soon).

              So, a corset messes up your muscles and spine, but at least you can just wear it during eating time to reduce your stomach capacity, and it doesn't mess with your nutrient absorption or require surgery (which carry inherent risks).

              Of course, having a reduced stomach size really doesn't stop people from eating too much. It can if they want it to, just like bariatric surgery works for a few people who really want it too. Think of all the pregnant women who's stomachs are squished due to the baby being in there. They just eat more frequently and manage to consume enough food to gain 30+ pounds (some eating waaaaay too much--and too much of the wrong stuff--and struggling with weight issues thereafter). Reduced stomach size really only works if you want it to, and I'd definitely take the corset over surgery any day, but being Primal works a whole lot better, I'm sure!

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              • #37
                Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                You should be able to get your waist down to that point simply by lacing up a corset that is properly sized.
                yup. i agree that this body-modification isn't all that extreme, really.

                the results can be semi-permanent with consistent corset training. That means, of course, that if one forgoes wearing a corset 'ever again' the body goes back to it's original shapes. But wearing the corset regularly (usually over several months), then when you aren't wearing the corset, you will have smaller waist.

                Also, it's only bad for muscles/spine if you are not exercising and/or using it improperly and/or using specific designs of corsets (some designs do deform the spine because of the position that they put you in). But most of them are just fine, so long as you are doing your exercising.

                Post partum, it's common for c-section mommas to receive compression garments/girdles from their doctors to help with recovery. And, belly binding is a long-traditional practice. I did a combination of both for the first two weeks. It wasn't comfortable or easy, but it felt good once I was bound up and standing. I also did the exercises that I could do (some basic yoga/pilates stuff, as well as walking). After that, I just didnt' bother really.

                In terms of how this modifies the body, I think it's mostly a choice. If you understand what the modification is, how it might affect you, etc, then it might be worth trying.

                For me, I see this as a body modification -- similar to a tattoo or piercing or what have you. I've been curious about it since about 1998, but I always figured that it might have a negative impact on pregnancy. And, back then, there wasn't quite as much information on it as we have now. . .so it's easier to gather information about what that impact may be to quality of life, etc.

                There are lots of ways to 'waist train' -- from heavy-duty, old school 24 hr training common in victorian era boarding schools for girls, to "roller coaster" methods that can take 3 months to get to a 4-inch change.

                And it seems that most of the women that I'm reading about now (since this re-piqued my interest) actually follow very strict diet and exercise regimens to keep their muscles strong, to develop core and back strength. No bubbly drinks, nothing that would give you an upset stomach or gas. Lots of intermittent fasting in the group -- lots of weight training, yoga, pilates, and belly dancing too. Interesting stuff.
                Last edited by zoebird; 08-06-2013, 02:48 AM.

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                • #38
                  How does the corset work?

                  A corset does not help you lose fat (or weight) per se.

                  At the most basic level, it compresses your floating ribs in, and shifts your intestines around a bit (which also happens in pregnancy, during breathing and exercise in general, etc -- it's not like the things don't move). This gives you a narrower waist.

                  because it restricts the expansion of a person's stomach for consuming food, most waist trainers need to eat several small meals, though it looks like most of them are some form of paleo and/or "healthy balanced diet," and many of them are intermittent fasters to boot (this is just from reading various waist-trainers blogs). Most of the waist-training "experts" and "coaches" provide nutritional and exercise coaching as part of their sales packages.

                  as such, if you eat 2400 calories a day in two big meals, you'd probably need to divide that into 6 small meals.

                  From there, they also do exercise -- and recommend that you do not wear a corset while exercising, largely because it can damage the corset.

                  For exercise, a lot of the gals seem to do weight training, yoga, pilates, and some form of dance, with belly dance being favored. So, there is focus on developing core stability and overall trimming that area just as most people are concerned about it, etc.

                  But literally, the corset moves the bones and organs, and htat's how the waist gets smaller. But the muscles, etc, just stretch/move around the compression.

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                  • #39
                    I can't believe so many people feel positive about this! I looked back to see if I was on the wrong forum! It is no wonder Victorian women had so many 'fits of the vapours' and fainted at the least shock. The Rational Dress Society (By Oscar Wilde's wife Constance, among others) was set up to combat the expectation that women do this to themselves. Foot binding and female genital mutilation next?

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                    • #40
                      24" like she used to have before corsetting (it looks like) would be my wet dream.
                      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

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                      • #41
                        Oh, hell no!!

                        A corset for Halloween or a theater play or perhaps one that pushes the boobs up for some sexy time fun, okay, but I absolutely stand for the all-natural body.

                        Evolution didn't get it wrong - had human females needed a 16" waist as adults, we would all have them, without the aid of artificial tools like corsets.
                        I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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                        • #42
                          Well, my 'corset' was eliminating wheat and a bunch of other junk from my diet and good old fashioned exercise. Never made it to 16" waist, but I can live with my 25" one.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                            But literally, the corset moves the bones and organs, and htat's how the waist gets smaller. But the muscles, etc, just stretch/move around the compression.
                            And that doesn't strike you as un-natural and un-healthy???

                            Originally posted by spinningwoman View Post
                            I can't believe so many people feel positive about this! I looked back to see if I was on the wrong forum! It is no wonder Victorian women had so many 'fits of the vapours' and fainted at the least shock. The Rational Dress Society (By Oscar Wilde's wife Constance, among others) was set up to combat the expectation that women do this to themselves. Foot binding and female genital mutilation next?
                            Finally. A sensible comment.

                            Or as Crabbcakes says
                            Oh, hell no!!
                            Last edited by Paleobird; 08-06-2013, 10:13 AM.

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                            • #44
                              For me, I see this as a body modification -- similar to a tattoo or piercing or what have you.
                              But a tattoo or piercing doesn't atrophy muscles or compress/move around internal organs. We have waists of a certain thickness due to muscle, bone and space that we need for organs and to support the weight of our body. Kind of like the reason we have feet of a certain size is to help us walk correctly.

                              To me, this is more like the neck stretching I have seen done (with the rings). Potentially harmful to your frame and body.

                              http://maggiesfeast.wordpress.com/
                              Check out my blog. Hope to share lots of great recipes and ideas!

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                              • #45
                                Personally, I support a woman's right to choose what she does with her body. I, also, try not to judge her for her choices. I thought that was how it worked.

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