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  • #31
    Here's something I've been trying to think of... Are there any jobs out there where you are on your feet, moving around and where you are around others that are not retail or construction? Anything that fits those criteria that actually pays well without requiring a second mortgage worth of schooling? I've been really trying to come up with a more active job that I have the skills to do, and that's wher I'm basically coming up empty.

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    • #32
      Maybe this link could help? Occupation Finder : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

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      • #33
        A few from the above that don't need a huge schooling investment...

        Appraisers and Assessors of Real Estate
        Claims Adjusters
        Occupational Health and Safety Technicians
        Occupational Therapy Assistants and Aides

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        • #34
          Originally posted by nikitakolata View Post
          Here's something I've been trying to think of... Are there any jobs out there where you are on your feet, moving around and where you are around others that are not retail or construction? Anything that fits those criteria that actually pays well without requiring a second mortgage worth of schooling? I've been really trying to come up with a more active job that I have the skills to do, and that's wher I'm basically coming up empty.

          Nurse/Dr/ Physio/Teacher /Tour Guide/Fitness Trainer

          apart from Dr, the other cost very little if not free to retrain.

          What about owning your own guest house/B+B (I wanted to do this for a while now lol)
          Last edited by Hotmail; 07-22-2013, 09:38 AM.

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          • #35
            what about researching fairs/festivals/art shows within 100 miles of you to display and sell your jewelry on weekends? i know people who do this and are booked solid every weekend.
            As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

            Ernest Hemingway

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            • #36
              This is a cool tool. Thanks for sharing it!

              Originally posted by noodletoy View Post
              what about researching fairs/festivals/art shows within 100 miles of you to display and sell your jewelry on weekends? i know people who do this and are booked solid every weekend.
              I definitely want to go to art shows. The main problem is that it takes quite awhile for me make jewelry. Some pieces take longer than others, of course. The other "problem" is that so far I've been far too generous with my jewelry and give out a bracelet I would charge $350 for as a random birthday gift. I definitely need to stop that nonsense (well, I have stopped as of about 6 months ago).

              Anyway, my main motivation for bringing this thread back up is that I found and applied for a job that I REALLY want. The position is a jewelry class instructor at a community college. I meet every requirement in the posting so I am just waiting and hoping they call me for an interview. I know I could do the job well and I would love doing it. You know you really like something when you don't even care what the pay is, which I don't care in this case.

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              • #37
                Nikita, how fun, that would be a lovely thing to do... however if you don't get the job at the college, I can't see why you can't run the classes privately. Last year I went to a Japanese cooking class, this lady runs the classes from her home, evenings and weekends, depending on the course she is teaching (Japanese Classes and Courses :: Hashi) the weekend class I did was at the weekend, she ran it from her house, which was a normal house with a large kitchen, but really a normal family home. You can see a picture of her kitchen, there was about 12 of us in the class.

                So what I am saying is you can always do these classes, either at your home or hire a room at church/town hall, advertise for it with leaflets/gumtree/make your own webpage.

                Best of luck x

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                • #38
                  Start writing a novel. That's what I'd do if I had a job where I didn't have to do any work. Hah! I would LOVE to have a job like yours. Corner office far from everyone else. Little to no work. I'd just sit there and work on my novel. I bet I'd have something written within 6 months!

                  My journal

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Hotmail View Post
                    Nikita, how fun, that would be a lovely thing to do... however if you don't get the job at the college, I can't see why you can't run the classes privately. Last year I went to a Japanese cooking class, this lady runs the classes from her home, evenings and weekends, depending on the course she is teaching (Japanese Classes and Courses :: Hashi) the weekend class I did was at the weekend, she ran it from her house, which was a normal house with a large kitchen, but really a normal family home. You can see a picture of her kitchen, there was about 12 of us in the class.

                    So what I am saying is you can always do these classes, either at your home or hire a room at church/town hall, advertise for it with leaflets/gumtree/make your own webpage.

                    Best of luck x
                    I've definitely thought about setting up my own classes. The main problem is that making jewelry requires a lot of expensive and specialized equipment, not to mention hazardous chemicals. So, the cost to buy enough equipment for even 4 students would take many years to recoup. I have no idea how I could legally do that in my house without voiding my homeowners insurance, plus I'd need some serious additional insurance to protect myself if anyone ever got hurt, which is pretty likely to happen, unfortunately. I doubt a church would let me set up 5 torches in their basement either.

                    I may try and have metal clay classes since that requires a lot less equiptment and no torches, just a kiln. The only problem there is that I personally hate working with metal clay.

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                    • #40
                      Nikita, OK, but isn't there different levels of learning / classes? I know sometimes teenage girls go for jewellery classes, so am sure they don't used all the dangerous chemicals? Perhaps they only do some basic bead and glass decoration though, so not the type you'd be offering.

                      As for professional indemnity insurance, that's not a huge cost (well depends on your profession, for me when I was a freelance, it cost me about 250 a year)

                      For working from home/ running classes from home, am not sure, many people operate businesses/projects from home, e.g hairdressers, the cooking classes as previously posted and taylor/clothes makers, childminders etc. not sure how they do it, best to call your indurance and ask them, most likely you'd be able to top it up. The thing I'd be worried about is the council, I know a home office is fine, and am sure non of the child minders need council permisssion, but its something to consider.

                      Re the cost, I feel for you, the risk of investing maybe a lot, but if you start doing the classes evenings and weekends, you maybe able to keep your job to finance it until you can give up your job?

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                      • #41
                        My 9-5 is writing code; I supplement this with part time coaching jobs coaching oly lifting, crossfit to adults, teens and kids. My 9-5 pays the bills, my coaching fills my need to help others learn and improve. On the side I do technical coding projects to meet my own needs for learning, exploration and improvement. At the gym I work hard to get my physical needs met.

                        This is all to say that I don't really allow my work to define my life experience. Sure I spend a lot of time at it, but I don't define my happiness by it. Maybe you could work on transitioning your attentions outside of your 9-5?
                        ad astra per aspera

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by TheFastCat View Post
                          This is all to say that I don't really allow my work to define my life experience. Sure I spend a lot of time at it, but I don't define my happiness by it. Maybe you could work on transitioning your attentions outside of your 9-5?
                          That is what I have been doing for years. I've been ignoring how hollow and bored I am at work and use whatever spare time I have at work toward my real interests as much as I can. When I'm not at work I am generally pretty happy.

                          I was so excited about that jewelry teaching opportunity. Unfortunately, I'm not being considered for the job and I have no idea why. I really hate that; I wish there was some feedback about what I could do to be considered next time... do I need teaching experience? Better jewelry-making skills? A better written cover letter? What?

                          I made the mistake of telling my mom about being disappointed and feeling depressed that I'm going to be trapped in compliance hell for the rest of my life because it's the only thing I'm qualified to do. She reponds by saying that everyone hates their job. This bothers me for several reasons... 1. I know it isn't true. 2. Why would knowing someone else is unhappy make me feel better? and 3. I am desperately trying to GET OUT of this career because I hate it. Maybe it makes her feel better to know other people don't like their jobs because she refuses to do anything about it when she doesn't like something in her life (won't leave an unhappy marriage, doesn't look for a new job, won't try a new diet to lose weight, etc.). I am not like that. When I'm not happy with something I try really hard to change it. That's what I'm trying to do about my job right now. My outside of work life is great. Is it horrible to want to enjoy what I do to make money too?

                          I am just really ticked off right now. Plus, I know my mom is probably offended because I basically told her what I wrote above minus mentioning that she refuses to do anything about her problems and now she's probably going to be mad/upset. Seriously though, I am sick of that non-advice from people who refuse to do anything to improve their own lives. I am surrounded by way too many people like that, apparently. Sorry, end rant...

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                          • #43
                            do you have actual teaching experience? they may have chosen another candidate who does.

                            start building up your inventory and get serious about selling your stuff. the more you do it, the more proficient you will get too.
                            As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy and to make plans.

                            Ernest Hemingway

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              From a business perspective, I would focus on the boutique market. I helped a friend of mine with this.

                              She likes to make jewelry from recycled materials. Her stuff is really cool. She would go to craft shows and do an etsy shop. She did ok. But by changing to the boutique market, she really started to do well.

                              We identified 4 boutiques in our city that we thought would fit well with the values of what she created. I helped her create a cohesive brand idea, a web site (which focused on the boutique market), and a marketing strategy. We went in and presented her offerings in a seasonal fashion (just how clothing is done), and so we pitched the "Fall" stuff in Spring. She showed the designs, brought her current designs in, and was able to get 3 wholesale deals out of it, with a contract to see the next season.

                              We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city. She made arrangements to travel there, and once there, one of the boutiques wanted exclusivity in the market in that city. To do that, she paid a premium on the wholesale goods -- so no other boutiques would offer these pieces. This has become her biggest client.

                              We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city, and so on. Each season, she pitches for the next year's opposite season, gets her orders and then sets to manufacturing. She also tries to identify markets for her work.

                              This season (right now), so many pieces were ordered from her 8 or so clients that she had to hire a friend to help her manufacture the jewelry. It's looking like this may become a full time position for her friend, while my friend goes and seeks out a few more speciality clients.

                              Her goals now are to continue to expand her client base -- moving into the Australian market as well -- and maintain herself and her friend in the business (ie, be able to pay both of them).

                              it really made a huge difference in how her jewelry sells, and she no longer does the jewelry stalls or etsy because she makes better bulk sales to these boutiques. And, they value her work, so it's a great relationship.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                                From a business perspective, I would focus on the boutique market. I helped a friend of mine with this.

                                She likes to make jewelry from recycled materials. Her stuff is really cool. She would go to craft shows and do an etsy shop. She did ok. But by changing to the boutique market, she really started to do well.

                                We identified 4 boutiques in our city that we thought would fit well with the values of what she created. I helped her create a cohesive brand idea, a web site (which focused on the boutique market), and a marketing strategy. We went in and presented her offerings in a seasonal fashion (just how clothing is done), and so we pitched the "Fall" stuff in Spring. She showed the designs, brought her current designs in, and was able to get 3 wholesale deals out of it, with a contract to see the next season.

                                We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city. She made arrangements to travel there, and once there, one of the boutiques wanted exclusivity in the market in that city. To do that, she paid a premium on the wholesale goods -- so no other boutiques would offer these pieces. This has become her biggest client.

                                We then identified 4 more boutiques in another city, and so on. Each season, she pitches for the next year's opposite season, gets her orders and then sets to manufacturing. She also tries to identify markets for her work.

                                This season (right now), so many pieces were ordered from her 8 or so clients that she had to hire a friend to help her manufacture the jewelry. It's looking like this may become a full time position for her friend, while my friend goes and seeks out a few more speciality clients.

                                Her goals now are to continue to expand her client base -- moving into the Australian market as well -- and maintain herself and her friend in the business (ie, be able to pay both of them).

                                it really made a huge difference in how her jewelry sells, and she no longer does the jewelry stalls or etsy because she makes better bulk sales to these boutiques. And, they value her work, so it's a great relationship.
                                This is my ultimate goal. I live in an area with a lot of boutiques and small stores that I think would be great places to sell my jewelry. The big problem I'm having is making it quickly enough and manufacturing multiples. But, I am working on it. I'm just really not great at wax carving so my progress isn't happening as fast as I'd like. It's good to read a post like this to remind me to keep my eye on my goal, even though it seems so far off right now.

                                I swear, I go a little insane at work. I don't know how to explain it. When I'm stuck in that office with nothing to do and no one to talk to my mind just goes to a dark place. I don't handle it very well, I guess. As soon as I'm home I feel so different. I usually have more energy right away (some days/weeks I'm depressed, but not always) and I just feel so much better about life that I think I'd be insane to want to move or change anything major. But, then I go back to the office the next day and repeat the cycle. I really wish they'd just give me a serious amount of work to do! It's amazing that anyone could think I was busy with what I do currently. I ask for work all the time, pretty much from anyone who looks stressed out...

                                Anyway, thanks for reminding me to keep my eye on the prize. If you don't mind sharing your friend's website with me, I would love to check it out.

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