Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Food issues in 3yr old?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Food issues in 3yr old?

    My daughter K is almost 3.
    She has been potty trained day and night since about Feb.
    Since then she's been pooping her pants at least once a day, usually twice. She doesn't even notice half the time, even though it's more than a streak.
    Part of me wonders if it's an attention thing bc she's the middle kid, with a 6yr old sister and 7 month old sister.
    But part of me wonders if it's food related too, since she can control it during the night.
    We eat gluten free 95% of the time bc it helps the 6yr old with bedwetting and chronic UTIs.
    The kids have some processed stuff, but I do try to limit it. They eat traditional dairy, though not milk. They will eat vegetables and love meat.
    Can a poop issue be because of sugar? Food additives? Food coloring?
    Hubby thinks I'm blowing it all out if proportion and trying to make food the culprit for everything.
    What should I do? It's hard to really limit their diet bc I'm not left with much they'll eat.
    Help! I'm so tired of washing out dirty undies.....
    Needing some accountability, so here's my stats:
    34yrs old, 5'5"
    CW: 163lbs (07/2014)
    GW: 135lbs or less
    Eating mainly paleo, but including a bit of white rice (don't call the Paleo Police!)

  • #2
    Are there "primal" foods they flat out won't eat? What exactly would you be cutting out of their diets that you're concerned about? Honestly, someone may have experience with this kind of thing, but you really just need to experiment. Cutting out food additives, food coloring, and sugar is a good idea regardless.
    Depression Lies

    Comment


    • #3
      I think you need to see a doctor. I have never heard of a 6 year old getting UTIs before (usually that happens to teenaged and adult girls once they become sexually active, it's very sex-related...) It is interesting that elimination of gluten helps, maybe her BMs are less messy and it doesn't get into her UT?

      But really, I'd see a doc. It COULD be food-related, but it could also be other things. For instance, maybe she can't feel that she's doing it. I don't know. A healthy diet solves a lot of problems, yes, but it sounds like you're feeding them a pretty healthy diet. If I were to give one dietary suggestion, though, I'd try the no dairy. Lots of kids are lactose-intolerant, and it could be that she just can't, erm, 'hold it in.'
      Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

      Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
      Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
      Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
      F/23/5'9"

      26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by kathleen View Post
        I think you need to see a doctor. I have never heard of a 6 year old getting UTIs before (usually that happens to teenaged and adult girls once they become sexually active, it's very sex-related...) It is interesting that elimination of gluten helps, maybe her BMs are less messy and it doesn't get into her UT?

        But really, I'd see a doc. It COULD be food-related, but it could also be other things. For instance, maybe she can't feel that she's doing it. I don't know. A healthy diet solves a lot of problems, yes, but it sounds like you're feeding them a pretty healthy diet. If I were to give one dietary suggestion, though, I'd try the no dairy. Lots of kids are lactose-intolerant, and it could be that she just can't, erm, 'hold it in.'
        WTH? Anyone can get a UTI at any age. It may be more common when people are sexually active, but it's just bacteria. Perhaps she plays with herself or is not being washed appropriately (you don't need to clean intrusively) and is just getting bacteria in there.

        The OP didn't really say what the kids eat. She mentioned processed foods, so it may not be a "pretty healthy" diet.

        Starting with eliminating dairy is a good idea though.
        Depression Lies

        Comment


        • #5
          Yup, anyone at any age can get a UTI. My friend had them all her life. Something to do with the length or malformation of her urethra or ureters. There are many causes.

          As for the 3yo... this could be a 3yo thing, not a food thing. Just because she is 'potty trained' and *can* eliminate successfully doesn't mean she cares whether she soils herself or not. Its not really that uncommon for preschoolers to not want to interrupt play to poop. Even some school aged kids. You've also got an older sibling with chronic elimination issues. Perhaps there's some modeling going on here. Without making an issue of it, it would be beneficial to observe the behavior and see if there are any patterns before making any changes to the routine or diet.

          FWIW, when my kids were that age, we reinforced some potty-positive habits, like making it a rule that you visited the toilet before laying down in bed, sitting down to a meal, before leaving the house (even for the shortest trip), before putting on a costume or uniform. Whether you had to go or not. It's amazing how a kid who "doesn't have to go" magically gets the sensation when they're on the potty. And how annoying it is when the kid who didn't have to go 5 minutes ago, exclaims the need to poop as soon as you're in line at the post office.
          Sandra
          *My obligatory intro

          There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

          DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

          Comment


          • #6
            My 3 yr old poops in her nappy (diaper) but is pretty advanced in other ways. It's a kid thing and she'll grow out of it. I hardly do it at all anymore.
            Man seeks to change the foods available in nature to suit his tastes, thereby putting an end to the very essence of life contained in them.
            www.primaljoy.co.uk

            Comment


            • #7
              We've done every test for my 6yr old re: UTIs and everything is normal. Not eating gluten since the new year, and she hasn't had one since Feb. She would get them every 4-5 weeks and abx really didn't do anything. Maybe leaky gut affects her urinary and/or immune system.

              For my 3 yr old, maybe it's just attention bc of the baby. It might be sugar, incl honey and fruit. Will try reducing those and then reducing dairy. She eats far more fruit than dairy.
              Needing some accountability, so here's my stats:
              34yrs old, 5'5"
              CW: 163lbs (07/2014)
              GW: 135lbs or less
              Eating mainly paleo, but including a bit of white rice (don't call the Paleo Police!)

              Comment


              • #8
                Has she ever experienced constipation? Sometimes little ones develop issues like this that can last a long time after a single bout of constipation.

                On a more fun note, I have a friend who used a potty party basket to help encourage her daughter to poop on the toilet. There was a basket of little wrapped gifts (mostly cute little trinkets, books, etc) that stayed in the bathroom. Every time her daughter pooped in the toilet she got to pick a gift to unwrap. It worked really fast!
                Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  could be a gut issue in general -- perhaps an overabundance of a certain bacteria in her gut colonies or some such. I suggest bone broth (with some gelatin in it if possible). Also, fermented foods.

                  And yes, we notice a difference when we have grains/processed stuff -- my husband does in particular. We do ok with rice, but gluten goes bad!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by namelesswonder View Post
                    WTH? Anyone can get a UTI at any age. It may be more common when people are sexually active, but it's just bacteria. Perhaps she plays with herself or is not being washed appropriately (you don't need to clean intrusively) and is just getting bacteria in there.

                    The OP didn't really say what the kids eat. She mentioned processed foods, so it may not be a "pretty healthy" diet.

                    Starting with eliminating dairy is a good idea though.
                    Yes, what the hell. I have never heard of UTI's in children, but like you said, that's because it's uncommon. It is rare for young girls to get them, and concerning that she has them chronically. That, I would say, is diet related. If BMs are loose, it's likely to leak around and infect other areas. As per playing with yourself, most children do it, and rather constantly at that. Yet no UTIs.

                    Also, the OP provided very good insight into their diet. Meats, vegetables, and gluten free as I recall.



                    I honestly think that the child is unaware when she's sleeping. After all, she spent her entire life being able to poo in a diaper while sleeping. Maybe it's unconscious. But I wouldn't trust my child's health to the advice of me or anyone else on a public internet forum.
                    Stumbled into Primal due to food allergies, and subsequent elimination of non-primal foods.

                    Start Gluten-Free/Soy-Free: December 2012; start weight 158lbs, Ladies size 6
                    Start Primal: March 2013, start weight 150lbs, Ladies size 6
                    Current: 132lbs, Ladies size 2
                    F/23/5'9"

                    26lbs lost since cutting the crap.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Kathleen, UTI's are actually very common in little girls and some are more prone than others. I'm guessing you don't have kids and don't spend a lot of time with moms talking about their kids.

                      To the OP, you say that your almost 3 yr old daughter has been potty trained since Feb, but she's pooped in her pants every day since then. To me that isn't potty trained!!! I would have put her back in diapers or pull-ups ages ago. In my experience kids will potty train when they're ready. If you wait until they're ready, the process is relatively painless. It sounds to me like your daughter just isn't ready. And I'm with your hubby on this one: I don't think it's food related. I think it's just a little kid who has only partially mastered potty training.
                      Ann of the Jungle's Primal Blueprint Journal:
                      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread78155.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ann of the Jungle View Post
                        Kathleen, UTI's are actually very common in little girls and some are more prone than others. I'm guessing you don't have kids and don't spend a lot of time with moms talking about their kids.

                        To the OP, you say that your almost 3 yr old daughter has been potty trained since Feb, but she's pooped in her pants every day since then. To me that isn't potty trained!!! I would have put her back in diapers or pull-ups ages ago. In my experience kids will potty train when they're ready. If you wait until they're ready, the process is relatively painless. It sounds to me like your daughter just isn't ready. And I'm with your hubby on this one: I don't think it's food related. I think it's just a little kid who has only partially mastered potty training.
                        Gosh - I totally agree 100%. Three year olds poo in their pants - all the time. they just don't care very much - they would rather continue playing than take the time out to poo. She is just not ready.

                        Put her back in nappies. Create a star chart and give her a pretty gold star when she does poos in the toilet and all the praise about being a big girl.

                        Worked for my three - and I can't tell you how many times I had to clean dirty undies... Not my favourite pastime but it passed pretty quickly when we concentrated on the potty training again.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          She has been potty trained day and night (OMG!!!) since about Feb.
                          Since then she's been pooping her pants at least once a day, usually twice. She doesn't even notice half the time, even though it's more than a streak.
                          Just as well could be that she notices and feels that this is the one and only thing that she can control in her way, not the way you want her to do. Kind of a manifestation of first independence. You press hard on her potty training day and night for many months, she finds her inner Mahatma Gandhi and goes in non-violent resistance mood. Happens more often than parents realise. And nothing to do with food or infection.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Well there is a condition called encopresis. Basically its like not having full control over the bowels. My daughter struggled with this for years, and the pediatrician basically told us she would outgrow it. They also said it was genetic, and in fact a member of my husbands family also had it.

                            When we finally went fully wheat/gluten free with the kids, the encopresis stopped completely. She knows now when she gets gluten because it gives her a stomach ache, loose stool, and the inability to control her bowels. And yes, it was the same as you are describing. Not a full bowel movement, just a partial. And she was usually unaware of it even being there. She was about 8.5 when she went fully paleo, and thats when it stopped.

                            (My personal view is its another indication of sensitivity to gluten.)

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X