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Has anyone here successfully immigrated to the USA?

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  • #16
    Thanks for the input everyone!

    Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
    Before you decide anything, make sure you visit an immigration lawyer to find out your options. People who make plans based on misconceptions about immigration law can seriously mess up the rest of their lives.
    Originally posted by loafingcactus View Post
    And a lawyer knows stuff you have no hope of knowing. For example, I remember one time we had a document due the same day as a major filing deadline for a large group of people that didn't include us. Our lawyer told us that if we filed on that day it would just get lost and for that particular day the lawyers had been told to stay away and just bring their stuff the next day when everything was calmed down and it would still count as being on time.
    An immigration lawyer is a good idea. Do you think it would be better to find someone in the States or in my country of residence?

    Originally posted by Dragonfly View Post
    if you have any relatives or a job opportunity that will sponsor you, you could get in.
    Thanks Df - I have someone who said they will sponsor me I'm not sure what the protocol is after this though... just seems too easy just to have a sponsor and be able to rock up...?

    Originally posted by fresa View Post
    If you know where you want to immigrate to (as in region of the US), it might help to contact one of the state offices of the Senators of the state. I know they know the process, and can give you real information on how it works, your options, how long it might take, what routes you should take, etc. The idea of contacting a government entity doesn't appeal to a lot of people, but working with immigrants is one of their main jobs ,and their caseworkers will know whats up! A call or letter certainly wouldn't hurt, at the very least.
    That is amazing advice fresa - thank you!!! Never would have thought of that. I'm in the States at the moment so it's easy for me to suss out.

    Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
    Eh, don't come here. Find a better managed and less poorly lead nation like the Netherlands or something. It's a lot of work to get in and really, there are better options.
    To respond to that would involve me telling you all the reasons I love California, and there are just too many... I could wager that I've travelled more than most people, and nowhere else compares to it (for me).
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    • #17
      I want to marry into the UK or EU. It's be nice to have different employment options


      Excuse me for any typos and sarcastic remarks, sent from my iPhone using Marks Daily Apple Forum mobile app

      Comment


      • #18
        To get started, you can check the web site that the US government has set up that goes over this business.

        From there, you'll find all kinds of links to the different kinds of visas and what you might qualify for (or not). It isn't easy to immigrate to the US if you aren't "special" in some way (in work, or a refugee, etc). You would likely require the employment visa process -- which can take years.

        I would recommend a lawyer to facilitate the process, and calling a person in the government of the region where you want to be is not a bad idea.

        Likewise, as another poster mentioned, the easiest method seems to be through NAFTA -- many people go through Canada. In fact, most of the people whom I know have gone through Canada. Of course, as mentioned, they are all specialists in medical or scientific fields, and it takes years before they have permanent residence in the US (with lots of scary visa renewals in the process -- even with jobs in medical and scientific fields in place before they immigrate).

        In addition, you're going to need a lot of money. You're going to need money to pay all of the relevant processing fees (and there are a lot of them). You're going to need money to pay the lawyer who facilitates your immigration process (lawyers are insanely expensive, but in the US, you MUST have one). And you're going to need money to demonstrate that you can support yourself for a bit once you get to the US -- even if you do have a job waiting for you when you arrive.

        While I do think it is worthwhile to live your dream, it is incredibly challenging to immigrate to the US. I know many people who have done it, but it certainly takes a lot of focus and dedication.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by MEversbergII View Post
          Eh, don't come here. Find a better managed and less poorly lead nation like the Netherlands or something. It's a lot of work to get in and really, there are better options.

          M.
          Depends on the person. I have spent my life split between two countries - Germany and the US (my mom holds a green card) - and here is my take: I tell everybody who asks me "which is better - the US or Germany??" this - if you are creative and truly freedom-minded and/or an independent person, you need the US; and if you are security-minded and don't mind being told what to do in all areas of your life as a trade-off for a government security net, Germany will feel very comfortable to you.

          In my mind, there is no true "better", just different. Well, okay, I would definitely say that the US is better than Mali for the foreseeable future. But I think you get my drift. Even in Europe, half of them would up stakes and move to another country as well. I think it is a human thing that the grass is always greener somewhere else.
          I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

          Comment


          • #20
            I can't speak for what it's like in Europe, but as a person who moved from the US for freedom/opportunity, I can certainly comment on the idea.

            Like many European nations, New Zealand has a healthy welfare system with all the great benefits. But NZ also has a lot of freedoms that we didn't have in the US -- largely because of those welfare systems (ie, subsidized private schooling; universal health care).

            It was much easier for us to start our business here, and it's much less competitive market besides. It's a culture of educated people always on the move (lots of travelling, moving to different countries, etc), as well as a hugely creative little country, too.

            Personally, it's just about perfect. Unless the current government screws it up.

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            • #21
              I came to the US on a student visa to do my MBA. Then I worked for 4.5 years at Amazon on a visa. Amazon was willing to sponsor me for a green card but my previous experience had nothing to do with my job then. Therefore the application went nowhere. Then Amazon and I parted ways and I went to work for Microsoft. There, while on a visa, I was able to obtain a green card based on my experience at Amazon.

              One screwed up thing with the green card process (via the employer) is that you cannot use your experience at the current company to justify the green card request. You can only use experience in a previous company. So you could work for 10 years in a company A after college, get a superb experience, and only be able to use that in a green card application when you move to another company.

              The high tech companies (and I suppose the big Wall Street firms) have the most experience sponsoring their candidates, so I suspect that software engineering is the most obvious way to get a green card.
              Last edited by JDelage; 06-16-2013, 07:20 AM.

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              • #22
                Oh, by the way, the first step is to religiously enter the green card lottery every year. The chances are slim, but it costs nothing to enter - you can do it easily online.

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                • #23
                  I have heard that Brits and Canadians are excluded form the lottery because they have so many other ways to get in.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by zoebird View Post
                    To get started, you can check the web site that the US government has set up that goes over this business.

                    From there, you'll find all kinds of links to the different kinds of visas and what you might qualify for (or not). It isn't easy to immigrate to the US if you aren't "special" in some way (in work, or a refugee, etc). You would likely require the employment visa process -- which can take years.

                    I would recommend a lawyer to facilitate the process, and calling a person in the government of the region where you want to be is not a bad idea.

                    Likewise, as another poster mentioned, the easiest method seems to be through NAFTA -- many people go through Canada. In fact, most of the people whom I know have gone through Canada. Of course, as mentioned, they are all specialists in medical or scientific fields, and it takes years before they have permanent residence in the US (with lots of scary visa renewals in the process -- even with jobs in medical and scientific fields in place before they immigrate).

                    In addition, you're going to need a lot of money. You're going to need money to pay all of the relevant processing fees (and there are a lot of them). You're going to need money to pay the lawyer who facilitates your immigration process (lawyers are insanely expensive, but in the US, you MUST have one). And you're going to need money to demonstrate that you can support yourself for a bit once you get to the US -- even if you do have a job waiting for you when you arrive.

                    While I do think it is worthwhile to live your dream, it is incredibly challenging to immigrate to the US. I know many people who have done it, but it certainly takes a lot of focus and dedication.
                    Thanks for all the info Zoe

                    Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                    if you are creative and truly freedom-minded and/or an independent person, you need the US.
                    I agree to a large extent. I find Americans just reflective and cool in a really natural way.

                    Originally posted by JDelage View Post
                    I came to the US on a student visa to do my MBA. Then I worked for 4.5 years at Amazon on a visa. Amazon was willing to sponsor me for a green card but my previous experience had nothing to do with my job then. Therefore the application went nowhere. Then Amazon and I parted ways and I went to work for Microsoft. There, while on a visa, I was able to obtain a green card based on my experience at Amazon.

                    One screwed up thing with the green card process (via the employer) is that you cannot use your experience at the current company to justify the green card request. You can only use experience in a previous company. So you could work for 10 years in a company A after college, get a superb experience, and only be able to use that in a green card application when you move to another company.

                    The high tech companies (and I suppose the big Wall Street firms) have the most experience sponsoring their candidates, so I suspect that software engineering is the most obvious way to get a green card.
                    Originally posted by JDelage View Post
                    Oh, by the way, the first step is to religiously enter the green card lottery every year. The chances are slim, but it costs nothing to enter - you can do it easily online.
                    Cheers for the insight! Yeah, I entered the lottery once before. Will keep trying.

                    Originally posted by snoops View Post
                    I have heard that Brits and Canadians are excluded form the lottery because they have so many other ways to get in.
                    Don't know about that, but I'm Irish anyways, so not an issue.
                    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                    - Ray Peat

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      How bad can ireland truly be? I always feel bad for foreigners in America. I think that all of them were duped by PR bullshit that was already obsolete and untrue in the 80s. Have you ever considered migrating to the old-style Soviet Union? If not, you should reconsider coming here.
                      "Ah, those endless forests, and their horror-haunted gloom! For what eternities have I wandered through them, a timid, hunted creature, starting at the least sound, frightened of my own shadow, keyed-up, ever alert and vigilant, ready on the instant to dash away in mad flight for my life. For I was the prey of all manner of fierce life that dwelt in the forest, and it was in ecstasies of fear that I fled before the hunting monsters."

                      Jack london, "Before Adam"

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Mr.Perfidy View Post
                        How bad can ireland truly be? I always feel bad for foreigners in America. I think that all of them were duped by PR bullshit that was already obsolete and untrue in the 80s. Have you ever considered migrating to the old-style Soviet Union? If not, you should reconsider coming here.
                        Mr. Perfidy, you need to leave NJ ASAP - that is your problem. Truly. I left going on eight years ago now, and regained my sanity. I don't know if I would want you as my next door neighbor, but this rural county has been our salvation (each in his/her own way for the members of my family). There are more rural counties like this out there in the US - they will make you believe in old values again.
                        I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Mr.Perfidy View Post
                          How bad can ireland truly be? I always feel bad for foreigners in America. I think that all of them were duped by PR bullshit that was already obsolete and untrue in the 80s. Have you ever considered migrating to the old-style Soviet Union? If not, you should reconsider coming here.
                          Well, there's no accounting for taste!
                          "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

                          In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

                          - Ray Peat

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Ireland has had some bit of economic upheaval, renewal, upheaval....so if that's one of your reasons for moving, I am not surprised.

                            There was this article on another site, in which one of the commenters posted that she had immigrated out of the US to another country and never looked back, happy as a clam. Of course, people pestered her for details. She went on to explain how she, a born and raised US citizen, well educated structural engineer, could not find work. According to her this was due to an accident she had a child that made for a disability that, although she can walk and function, would have sent the insurance for any hiring company thru the roof -- so they were always willing to contract w/ her but w/ no benefits.

                            This is a huge piece of the puzzle for our economy and a struggle for any on the hunt for work. She decided to move to Scotland; she said her education has been rewarded and not hindered by her disability (because of the subsidized health) and she's been there a happy 12 years.

                            Personally, I applaud your interest in making such a big leap. I've had coworkers go to Ireland for work and they're back stateside. I would love to make such an adventurous step and move to either Canada or NZ.

                            “you aren't what you eat - you are what you don't poop.” Wavy Gravy

                            Today I am Fillyjonk. Tommorow I will be Snufkin.

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