Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Say 10 random things about yourself!

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #91
    So right now we have a whole class of barely literate kids who have dipshit parents. Make school not compulsory and we get a whole class of totally illiterate kids with dipshit parents. The kids get punished more than the dipshit parents, and I'm investing in companies who run prisons because that's going to be the only place for most of those kids once they're adults.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

    Comment


    • #92
      A few months ago I read this and it made sense to me, just like Primal.

      Murray N. Rothbard :: Education: Free and Compulsory

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by canio6 View Post
        True, but in Finland you have to be in the top 90% of all college students to be accepted into the education master's program. Here in the US education majors usually are in the lowest scoring/performing (no, I am not saying all teachers are stupid. My dad is brilliant as I am sure every teacher here is too). That said, I think the major issues are with the system not the teachers themselves. Out of curiosity, how many teachers would work 50 weeks a year if it meant a pay raise? (obviously it would as they are currently only paid for 180-200 days).

        Prior to my current work i spent 17 years as a teacher educator. I can see that in Finland, having those evaluated as the top 10% of students qualify for university education in that profession is clearly working for them. This is not disconnected from a quality education system that graduates them, and, like childhood schools, is free for all. I guess it is the top 10% requirement that makes it garner respect, as well as a solid preparation that focuses on children being children, not hooked into classrooms and technology for long periods of the day, and where schooling through university is a right everyone has. They use their high taxes to do this, provide dental and medical care for a minimum cost, and a number of other social goods.
        Here in Canada and in the university at which I worked, I found that students who do well in HS are not necessarily better at what they do than someone in the middle pack, so to speak. The reason is that so much of teaching is about people and developing relationships, and caring, and social work, and so on. So, because a person's achievements are not the top does not mean that they are not capable, but perhaps other important aspects of learning are more important, perhaps with issues to overcome. I have found that students with complex stories and critical minds, and a love of children and young people can be excellent teachers, regardless of HS marks.

        Comment


        • #94
          Originally posted by Aili View Post
          I have found that students with complex stories and critical minds, and a love of children and young people can be excellent teachers, regardless of HS marks.
          And I would agree. However, it was my experience that in many places in the US creative teaching is not rewarded. It is about teaching to the state mandated tests, hitting certain metrics, and regurgitating approved lesson plans, which are often dictated by politicians or those far removed from an actual classroom. Again, I do not think teachers themselves are necessarily the issue (though the inability to fire incompetent teachers once they hit tenure does not help) but the system in many areas is not conducive to a real education.

          As (I think it was) Twain said, "I never let schooling interfere with my education." Too often these days we have lots of schooling and far too little education/learning.

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by JIMG View Post
            A few months ago I read this and it made sense to me, just like Primal.

            Murray N. Rothbard :: Education: Free and Compulsory
            Rothbard is great.... and his ideas are so different from CW.... Ever read his Man, Economy and Sate?

            Comment


            • #96
              I'd say the movement towards standardized testing, when there is NOTHING standardized about how, when, what, where and why people learn, is a huge part of the problems in education. Too much is expected of teachers and they are not nurtured and supported in ways that are needed, and yet teachers, regardless of their dreams end up teaching to the test b/c that is how worthiness as a teacher seems to be measured. LNCB in the US is followed by increased standardized tests in Canada. We had that debate and fight 3 decades ago and again it rears its ugly head! I think that next to parenting, the most important job on this planet is the formal teaching of children.

              Comment


              • #97
                Funny but I was just posting similar sentiments just as you were

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by ssn679doc View Post
                  Rothbard is great.... and his ideas are so different from CW.... Ever read his Man, Economy and Sate?
                  I agree Rothbard was a great man.
                  I know of it but that one is still on my to read list. I have read so many books from the Mises site, Human Action I started but didn't get to far really want to revisit it and try again.

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    From "Say ten things" straight to "Wah waa wah waa waa wah"

                    All this chat reminds me of the worst "sex" scene in a movie ever IMO.
                    It involves no actual sex, but it does involve teachers.
                    “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                    ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                    And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by JIMG View Post
                      I agree Rothbard was a great man.
                      I know of it but that one is still on my to read list. I have read so many books from the Mises site, Human Action I started but didn't get to far really want to revisit it and try again.
                      Human Action is a long slog.... but then again, so is Rothbards book.

                      Comment


                      • Yeah Cori!

                        Let's get back to the humping...I mean learning about other MDA peeps through 10 random things...Please?
                        Primal since 9/24/2010
                        "Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within." Miguel de Cervantes

                        Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools
                        MFP username: MDAPebbles67

                        Comment


                        • 1- The Red Cross won't take my blood, born and raised in France I was!
                          2- I knew my son was going to be a boy though we never asked to know the sex of the baby
                          3- My husband is 23 years my senior
                          4- I always question my happiness, haven't quite mastered that Carpe Diem thing...
                          5- My driver's license is the only test I ever failed
                          6- I have a more acute sense of smell than any other person I know
                          7- I plan to visit Uganda soon and check on the mission of a charity close to my heart
                          8- Fortune tellers intrigue me, but I am no buying any of it!
                          9- I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up
                          10- My dad passed away two months ago unexpectedly and I haven't gotten used to it yet.
                          _______________________________________

                          Adopted the Primal lifestyle on: August 9 2012.
                          My sporadic journal entries are here.

                          Results to date: I've lost (gained?) one belt hole!

                          Comment


                          • 1. I have 5 living sisters, 6 sisters total- oldest sister died of encephalitis just weeks before I was born.
                            2. I have congenital brain damage-- cerebral palsy.
                            3. I started earning a wage when I was 8, picking strawberries and beans..
                            4. I was a live-in babysitter, for the summer, when I was 13.
                            5. I was the first, in a large extended family, to go to college and earn a degree.
                            6. I frequently said as a child that I would have twins. My mother, a twin, repeatedly said, "God wouldn't do that to you because he already gave you enough to deal with-- CP.
                            7. My twins will be 23 in July.
                            8. My cousin was hit by a car while we walked home from the store when I was 14. We were walking shoulder to shoulder, at the time, yet I didn't feel the impact.
                            9. I have been legally separated, yet not divorced, for almost 10 years.
                            10. Tomi, here on MDA, and I live in the same city. Her husband has worked on boats owned by my family members.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by froggie View Post
                              9- I still don't know what I want to be when I grow up.
                              I'm 48, and I think I'm getting close to an answer.

                              Originally posted by froggie View Post
                              10- My dad passed away two months ago unexpectedly and I haven't gotten used to it yet.
                              Mine was 10 years ago, and it still hits me some days. It does get better, though.
                              Durp.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by nikitakolata View Post
                                Oh! I know how to make soap; I learned to do it because I wanted an all natural soap to use that didn't cost me a small fortune. There's a book called Smart Soapmaking that I got on amazon and she really makes the process foolproof and gives good tips on how to save money on supplies when you're just starting out.

                                Smart Soapmaking: The Simple Guide to Making Traditional Handmade Soap Quickly, Safely, and Reliably, or How to Make Luxurious Handcrafted Soaps for Family, Friends, and Yourself: Anne L. Watson: 9780938497424: Amazon.com: Books

                                The same author also has a book on milk soapmaking which is good as well. If you want to make soap, I say go for it! There are not a lot of start up costs and it's really not all that tough.
                                Oh, thankyou Nikita. I have just made my first batch and now waiting for it to cure.
                                Annie Ups the Ante
                                http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X