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Type 1 Diabetic Scared to take the leap!

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  • Type 1 Diabetic Scared to take the leap!

    Hi everyone, I have been reading all about the primal way of life, have got very excited about it but as a type 1 diabetic wanted to research thoroughly before leaping in! However, the more I read, the more confused I am becoming! My main concern is the whole ketone, ketosis, ketoacidosis thing!
    Should I be worried about this? Should I monitor my ketones? It has really put me off starting, but I really want to give it a go as I think it would really help both my general fitness and my diabetic control.

    Please help!

    Derek

  • #2
    Hey Derek,

    Glad to hear that you are thinking of making the change. When it comes to this primal way of eating, you will more than likely need to monitor your glucose levels carefully at least in the beginning. There will more than likely be a much lower need of insulin with this way of eating, so monitoring your levels as to make sure that you do not go hypoglycemic would be a very smart thing to do especially in the beginning.

    As far as the ketosis stuff, the state of nutritional ketosis that is referred to by many that eat this way is only a mild form of ketosis at around 3-5mg/dl which is nowhere close to being dangerous and can have health benefits. But with your diabetes it would be a good idea to make sure that your ketone levels do not get as high as to go into ketoacidosis which would be dangerous.

    Hope that help, best of luck!
    http://nickburgraff.com/

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    • #3
      I recommend you ease into this gradually. Start by cutting grains, but set yourself a target of cutting them back by 50g a day while monitoring your blood glucose. You can replace industrial seed oils with healthier fats at any time.

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      • #4
        Thanks to you both. I already do monitor my blood glucose levels closely and am a pump user so I will definately take this on board. I have a ketone meter (which I have never used!) so will get that out of the cupboard! How regularly do you think I should be checking for ketones? Also, if the ketones are rising beyond 5mg/dl what should be done to stop this rising further? Sorry for all the questions!

        Thanks for the advice of easing in gradually, I was all set to cut everything all at once!

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        • #5
          You really need to have a discussion with a medical specialist about these specific concerns.

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          • #6
            Hmm, that could be a tricky conversation. My medical specialist is all for throwing carbs into the body and throwing insulin at it and seeing what happens! And if the cholesterol goes up then throw some pills at it!
            I'll see what they say...

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            • #7
              I know doctors aren't all co-operative. But there are some questions that you probably shouldn't rely on a bunch of strangers on a forum to answer.

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              • #8
                Well I am not a doctor so this is not to be considered medical advice because only your doctor can give you that. But like eKatherine said, easing in is the best thing to do. And since I can't legally give you medical advice about insulin doses, I would just say that if I was a type one diabetic and my ketone levels started rising high then I would probably either eat something sugary as to give my cells glucose to use.
                http://nickburgraff.com/

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                • #9
                  Yes. You don't need to take any leaps, you could crawl into it if that's what you want.

                  Switching into a ketosis diet from a conventional diet is a very big change and I don't reccomend it to be the first thing you do. There will be a 'carb-flu' period where your body adapts to digesting fat and protein as its main sources of energy, and it will only worsen if you go into ketosis. heck, I can get carb-flu just from going into ketoisis from the primal blueprint. I'm not saying don't get into ketosis, but if you have yet to start eating paleo you will find that you'll have enough of a challenge the first week or two. A lot of new people drop out because they feel the transition is too difficult to maintain for long enough to even get into ketosis at all.

                  As for your doctor... well, those people just suck :P S/he's not going to decide what you will do with your body, however - I'd say switch to paleo, see if it have any positive changes on your insulin, and THEN have a talk with your doctor about the possibilities of getting into ketosis - but only when you yourself is the proof that cutting carbs is a viable way to go.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dotaman View Post
                    Hi everyone, I have been reading all about the primal way of life, have got very excited about it but as a type 1 diabetic wanted to research thoroughly before leaping in! However, the more I read, the more confused I am becoming! My main concern is the whole ketone, ketosis, ketoacidosis thing!
                    Should I be worried about this? Should I monitor my ketones? It has really put me off starting, but I really want to give it a go as I think it would really help both my general fitness and my diabetic control.

                    Please help!

                    Derek
                    I have type 1 and have been eating this way for a little over a year now. I've done VLC, low carb, moderate carb and high carb... lol I had to experiment to see what works for me. VLC and LC ( 20-50 grams) didn't work for me. Partly due to already being hypothyroid. I'm also in the gym about 5 days a week either lifting, running or sprinting, so the carbs I eat are needed. I feel best eating 90-130ish grams of carbs. I also make sure I have enough fat to blunt any spike from the carbs. Just my own personal experience.


                    BTW, from what I understand ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things. Ketosis did not work for me. I used the same amount of insulin being in ketosis and eating moderate carbs. I experienced insulin resistance while in ketosis. Again, this is just my personal experience. Every body has a different body, so see what works for you.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by brookesam View Post
                      BTW, from what I understand ketosis and ketoacidosis are two different things.
                      This.

                      I think that as long as you don't try to go VLC (<50g/day) you should be fine.
                      Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                      Griff's cholesterol primer
                      5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                      Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                      TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                      bloodorchid is always right

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                      • #12
                        Before you take any action, please buy and read "Diabetes Solution" by Richard K. Bernstein, M.D. He is also a type 1 diabetic since he was about 10. He is now a recognized expert in this field. His patients include the oldest living Type 1 diabetics.
                        "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                        • #13
                          Ketosis and Ketoacidosis are not the same.

                          Metabolic Effects of the Very-Low-Carbohydrate DiDiabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Dietary Ketosis

                          Diabetic patients know that the detection in their urine of the ketone bodies is a danger signal that their diabetes is poorly controlled. Indeed, in severely uncontrolled diabetes, if the ketone bodies are produced in massive supranormal quantities, they are associated with ketoacidosis [5]. In this life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus, the acids 3-hydroxybutyric acid and acetoacetic acid are produced rapidly, causing high concentrations of protons, which overwhelm the body's acid-base buffering system. However, during very low carbohydrate intake, the regulated and controlled production of ketone bodies causes a harmless physiological state known as dietary ketosis. In ketosis, the blood pH remains buffered within normal limits [5]. Ketone bodies have effects on insulin and glucagon secretions that potentially contribute to the control of the rate of their own formation because of antilipolytic and lipolytic hormones, respectively [9]. Ketones also have a direct inhibitory effect on lipolysis in adipose tissue [10].

                          Interestingly, the effects of ketone body metabolism suggest that mild ketosis may offer therapeutic potential in a variety of different common and rare disease states [11]. The large categories of disease for which ketones may have therapeutic effects are: 1) diseases of substrate insufficiency or insulin resistance; 2) diseases resulting from free radical damage; and 3) disease resulting from hypoxia [11].ets: Misunderstood "Villains" of Human Metabolism
                          Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

                          http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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                          • #14
                            Derek - good to hear from another Type 1! I am an insulin-resistant, Type I and am also on a pump (MiniMed). I have been tweaking diet and exercise combinations pretty much since I was diagnosed (at 13 yrs-old) and I have to say that a modified primal way of eating is probably the most steadying to blood sugar and insulin requirement I've found. I would not worry at all about the whole ketone issue at all. I think the ideal carb intake is dependent on your workout routine - if you're doing crossfit 4x a week and running and kiteboarding on the weekends then you will require more carbs to function. Obviously the first week or two you're going to want to double up on testing your blood sugar. There are times where I feel like I've eaten a ton of food and think "I better take some more insulin", but have forced myself to go back and list what I actually ate and realize that "more insulin" would send me through the floor. So there is some adjustment to your norms that you'll have to watch, but it sounds like you're already a control freak about it so that's good :-)

                            I have found that a combination of Primal and Body Ecology (food combining principles and the inclusion of fermented foods) has been the most amazing thing for drastically ironing out my brittle blood sugar numbers. I have found that moderate protein, moderate carbs (from vegis) and higher fat has allowed me to maintain beautiful blood sugars, with greatly reduced insulin intake and still feel completely satiated.

                            I hope you keep us updated on how primal works for you and how you like it!

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