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Difference between "Primal" and "Weston A Price Foundation"??

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  • #16
    Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
    I'm certainly not saying these breads and meals should be preferred to starchy tubers, melons, and squash. These "less than ideal" foods can still be thrived on if everything else is 'right'. I approach the idea of wellness slightly different than some here because I'm not just thinking in terms of the supermarket's incredible assortment of everything. I also want to know the practical side, the "if you have to" side, the survival and self-sufficient side for ALL different climates everywhere on Earth, not just sunny California.

    And plus, I don't have a faith or authority attitude about nutrition. If that were so, I'd be sticking to Primal 100% of the time. I sometimes save my willpower and time for other tasks in life than getting that last 10% of nutrition.
    I like WAP style eating, but personally it did not help relieve inflammation or help with weight loss. It was not until I did the autoimmune paleo diet that my health improved by leaps and bounds. For healthy individuals it may be a great choice.
    Using low lectin/nightshade free primal to control autoimmune arthritis. (And lost 50 lbs along the way )

    http://www.krispin.com/lectin.html

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    • #17
      Originally posted by otzi View Post
      Wow! You put a lot of thought into that reply...loved it! Spot on. Have you read WAP's writings on the Maori? He really loved them and was amazed at their health, strength and intelligence 'pre-contact'. He wrote quite a bit on what they did right before we screwed them up.
      I agree. It was interesting.

      Originally posted by jammies View Post
      I like WAP style eating, but personally it did not help relieve inflammation or help with weight loss. It was not until I did the autoimmune paleo diet that my health improved by leaps and bounds. For healthy individuals it may be a great choice.
      Fair enough.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
        Doesn't Mark admit that soaked/fermented grains and legumes are basically acceptable, but not worth the effort or cost, and there are better options (like sweet potato)?
        So far as I remember, yes, you are right. At least not worth the effort to him.
        Ancestral Health Info - My blog about Primal and the general ancestral health movement. Site just remodeled using HTML5/CSS3 instead of Wordpress.

        My MDA Friday success story - Stubborn Senior's Testimonial

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        • #19
          Originally posted by zoebird View Post
          WAPF-Fatties: I call them fatties because they mostly focus on eating fat, not because they are fat. Some of them eat about 3000 cals a day just from fat! It's amazing. When you go to the web site and you count up the calories for their "fertility diet" it's about 90% fat and 3000 calories per day. It's eggs, sweetbreads (glands) and liver (protein/vits/minerals), and then basically lard, marrow, raw butter, cod liver oil (lots and lots!), coconut oil. I know people who basically eat that each day. It's pretty much 90% fat, honestly.
          Hehehe.

          Impressive fat consumption.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by zoebird View Post
            WAPF-Fatties: I call them fatties because they mostly focus on eating fat, not because they are fat. Some of them eat about 3000 cals a day just from fat! It's amazing. When you go to the web site and you count up the calories for their "fertility diet" it's about 90% fat and 3000 calories per day. It's eggs, sweetbreads (glands) and liver (protein/vits/minerals), and then basically lard, marrow, raw butter, cod liver oil (lots and lots!), coconut oil. I know people who basically eat that each day. It's pretty much 90% fat, honestly.
            Any knowledge on what that does to your body? I shoot for a stick of butter in a day if I'm hungry, and I'll have some fat in my meat too. I can really feel the effects of that when I wake up the next day (positive effects). I can only imagine that x2.

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            • #21
              This is probably a dumb question, but here goes: if one is gluten-intolerant, is sourdough bread an issue? Fermenting doesn't break down the gluten, as much as it breaks down phytic acid...is that correct?

              I'd love to eat some sourdough bread once in a while
              A Post-Primal PrimalPat

              Do not allow yourself to become wrapped up in a food 'lifestyle'. That is ego, and you are not that.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by patski View Post
                This is probably a dumb question, but here goes: if one is gluten-intolerant, is sourdough bread an issue? Fermenting doesn't break down the gluten, as much as it breaks down phytic acid...is that correct?

                I'd love to eat some sourdough bread once in a while
                I am gluten-intolerant. I would never eat any sort of wheat or rye bread. The idea that normal fermentation of the dough eliminates the gluten and its by-products that cause immuno reactions borders on wishful thinking. I have never seen any convincing evidence that it is safe for gluten-intolerant people to eat.

                What would I need to see? Test results showing that consistently these products pass the <20ppm test.

                Weston Price observed a lot of things in the 30s or so. That's what called observational. It should point to more paths to research, not be taken as some sort of gospel. They didn't even have a clear idea what caused gluten intolerance back then.
                Last edited by eKatherine; 03-29-2013, 08:53 AM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by patski View Post
                  This is probably a dumb question, but here goes: if one is gluten-intolerant, is sourdough bread an issue? Fermenting doesn't break down the gluten, as much as it breaks down phytic acid...is that correct?

                  I'd love to eat some sourdough bread once in a while
                  You could eat a few pieces of toast with breakfast, and it probably wouldn't kill you.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by patski View Post
                    This is probably a dumb question, but here goes: if one is gluten-intolerant, is sourdough bread an issue? Fermenting doesn't break down the gluten, as much as it breaks down phytic acid...is that correct?

                    I'd love to eat some sourdough bread once in a while
                    Prior to primal, I thought I had arthritis. My finger joints would ache and hip would feel like it was going out regularly. That all went away with primal for nearly 3 years now. If I have bread of any kind more than like a slice's worth, the arthritis comes back. I have tried sourdough, sprouted, and others, but if it's made with wheat flour, I get joint flares.

                    If nothing like that happens to you, you can probably enjoy as much bread as you like--experiment with different kinds, that's what PB is all about--finding the best eating habits for yourself.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
                      You could eat a few pieces of toast with breakfast, and it probably wouldn't kill you.
                      That's the standard? Whether it kills you right away? Why even bother eating a healthy diet?

                      Hint: people who are gluten intolerant can experience all sorts of irreversible health problems caused by continuing to eat gluten, even if they are unaware they are intolerant.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                        That's the standard? Whether it kills you right away? Why even bother eating a healthy diet?

                        Hint: people who are gluten intolerant can experience all sorts of irreversible health problems caused by continuing to eat gluten, even if they are unaware they are intolerant.
                        I'm gluten-intolerant. Every once in a while, I have had some pizza or bread to see if things have changed, and they never have! I know that I can't eat too much gluten without getting mucus in my throat and nose along with the immediate indigestion. However, I've had a couple pieces of sourdough toast on occasion without problem.

                        Whether the toast kills her or not isn't the standard. She said she wanted some bread, so that was the way I advised her to go about it. If she decides she doesn't want to eat the bread because it is unhealthy, then she will not eat any at all. I'm not one to play games with this guilt of 'what's healthy, what's not' that people get caught up in. Either decide you WANT to do it, and eat it. Or decide you DON'T want to do it because it's unhealthy, and don't do it, AND don't feel subconsciously like you still want to have some.

                        Don't wage an internal war of willpower. Your habits and desires will quickly align in the healthiest, most satisfying way if you allow them to anyways. I eat mostly Paleo/Primal/WAPF because I WANT to, because of how it makes me feel, not because I'm doing it for a goal that I HAVE to do.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
                          Don't wage an internal war of willpower. Your habits and desires will quickly align in the healthiest, most satisfying way if you allow them to anyways. I eat mostly Paleo/Primal/WAPF because I WANT to, because of how it makes me feel, not because I'm doing it for a goal that I HAVE to do.
                          I'm not "waging an internal war of willpower". I have been gluten-free and healthier for it for a decade.

                          I want to grow old to see my as-yet-unborn grandchildren grow up, and people who try to convince me and others who are gluten intolerant that it's not important can just mind their own business. They don't have my best interests at heart.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                            I'm not "waging an internal war of willpower". I have been gluten-free and healthier for it for a decade.

                            I want to grow old to see my as-yet-unborn grandchildren grow up, and people who try to convince me and others who are gluten intolerant that it's not important can just mind their own business. They don't have my best interests at heart.
                            I am gluten intolerant as well, and a piece of bread is not going to keep me from seeing my kids grow old. You're being a bit drastic.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by wiltondeportes View Post
                              I am gluten intolerant as well, and a piece of bread is not going to keep me from seeing my kids grow old. You're being a bit drastic.
                              You have no idea what "gluten intolerance" is. None whatever. It is not a matter of a bit of excess mucus once in a while.

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                              • #30
                                She does have a point there, Wilton. Gluten intolerance is not an either you are/are not thing. It's a spectrum. Yours sounds relatively mild. Some people have serious reactions to just a little cornstarch in a sauce.

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