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Teach me about Coffee please. House blend, morning blend, WTF?

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  • #16
    1. There's another method of making coffee called a "pour over" which are ceramic or plastic funnels that sit on top of a coffee cup. You put a filter in there, and some grounds, then pour hot (just cooled from boiling) water over it. Lots of the benefits of a french press, but far less cleanup.

    2. I threw this out there a few weeks ago: https://www.alterracoffee.com/Home.aspx
    That coffee roaster is located in Milwaukee, near where I used to live. I still order their coffee online, as I haven't found anything I like as much in the past three years of moving around the country. The best thing I've found about their website are the flavor profiles. They give numeric values to a few different properties, and once you find a coffee you like, you can look at the flavor profile and find other similar ones. Or something completely different. For me, the biggest factor is the acidity, which I prefer low. You might even get them to send you a sampler pack of several different small bags, if you call and talk to a manager.

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    • #17
      Also, make sure you're making it strong enough. For some reason the flavor is terrible if the coffee is too weak.

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      • #18
        You have to leave North America. There is no other way to learn about good coffee
        Four years Primal with influences from Jaminet & Shanahan and a focus on being anti-inflammatory. Using Primal to treat CVD and prevent stents from blocking free of drugs.

        Eat creatures nose-to-tail (animal, fowl, fish, crustacea, molluscs), a large variety of vegetables (raw, cooked and fermented, including safe starches), dairy (cheese & yoghurt), occasional fruit, cocoa, turmeric & red wine

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        • #19
          Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
          While blends can suck, it's also true that a proper blend can bring out the best in the varieties used in a way that is greater than the sum of the whole. I used to roast and blend my own beans, and I definitely recommend it as not only a learning tool, but a way to save money.
          Fair enough. I put a blanket statement on coffee chains.
          My chocolatey Primal journey

          Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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          • #20
            Here ya go. Everything you need to know...

            Welcome, we hope you enjoy your visit! | Pot of Gold Coffee Roasting Co. | Pot of Gold Coffee Thetis Island
            Sandra
            *My obligatory intro

            There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

            DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

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            • #21
              Originally posted by peril View Post
              You have to leave North America. There is no other way to learn about good coffee
              really? what kind of ridiculous statement is that? apparently we don't have the internet here, great coffee shops, artisian roasters, or access to the best beans in the world? i guess i must be deluded in to thinking that my bastard breed morning coffee, grown in the slums of jersey city and roasted with a bic lighter was the nectar of the gods. please enlighten us ignorant residents of north america

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              • #22
                A good starting point for learning about coffee and how to go from where you are to a vastly improved cup is a book called "corroded manifesto". Available as ebook from amazon.

                I also highly recommend finding a local coffee roaster and coffee shop where you can taste and learn about different roast levels, coffee sources, etc.

                I agree that some roasters use blends that are cut with poor quality beans, many are devoted to finding nice balance in a cup. Different beans from different areas roasted to different levels all bring out different aspects of taste, aroma, and mouthfeel. There are lots of great coffee roasters and cafes in north america. Find one, frequent it, learn, enjoy.

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                • #23
                  See heres the thing. I'm terribly lazy and don't really want to find local roasters and taste their wares. I want other people to tell me what they like so I can try it and then figure out what I want for myself. But I need a starting point from someone with more knowledge than I, such as that potofgold company sandra posted. Im looking into some of their stuff.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Jamie Madrox View Post
                    See heres the thing. I'm terribly lazy and don't really want to find local roasters and taste their wares. I want other people to tell me what they like so I can try it and then figure out what I want for myself. But I need a starting point from someone with more knowledge than I, such as that potofgold company sandra posted. Im looking into some of their stuff.
                    Ok..instead of starting out super fancy, do you live near a wegmans or trader joes?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Jamie Madrox View Post
                      See heres the thing. I'm terribly lazy and don't really want to find local roasters and taste their wares. I want other people to tell me what they like so I can try it and then figure out what I want for myself. But I need a starting point from someone with more knowledge than I, such as that potofgold company sandra posted. Im looking into some of their stuff.
                      Get an Aeropress. That thing makes junk coffee taste delicious. Then buy the cheapest stuff you can find. Done deal.
                      The Champagne of Beards

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                      • #26
                        An interesting factoid is that coffee begins to rapidly deteriorate within days after roasting. By a week's time, it is worthless. Either you roast your own or locate a local roaster that can supply you with truly freshly-roasted coffee.

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                        • #27
                          Since I don't want to micro manage every little aspect of my diet, I buy the Kroger brand of the dark-French roast whole bean coffee. I grind it myself in my electric grinder and brew it in one of those basic, drip coffee makers. It tastes pretty awesome and very cheap less than $4 for a bag.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                            An interesting factoid is that coffee begins to rapidly deteriorate within days after roasting. By a week's time, it is worthless. Either you roast your own or locate a local roaster that can supply you with truly freshly-roasted coffee.
                            This. To the OP: I have no experience with mail ordering roasted beans. If you want quality coffee at home, the most essential step is to find beans that have been roasted within the past few days (or roast yourself - not as hard as it sounds). Don't buy a shitload, only what you can use in a week. Grind just prior to brewing. Drip, aeropress, or french press brewing methods will make fine cups of coffee, if done properly. Tell us where you live and I am happy to do a quick search to find a top-notch coffee roaster in your area.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Jamie Madrox View Post
                              See heres the thing. I'm terribly lazy and don't really want to find local roasters and taste their wares. I want other people to tell me what they like so I can try it and then figure out what I want for myself. But I need a starting point from someone with more knowledge than I, such as that potofgold company sandra posted. Im looking into some of their stuff.
                              You could do what lazy coffee drinkers do and get one of those Keurig machines and all the pretty little k-cups and tell yourself you're drinking fancy coffee.
                              Sandra
                              *My obligatory intro

                              There are no cheat days. There are days when you eat primal and days you don't. As soon as you label a day a cheat day, you're on a diet. Don't be on a diet. ~~ Fernaldo

                              DAINTY CAN KISS MY PRIMAL BACKSIDE. ~~ Crabcakes

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                              • #30
                                I buy fair trade organic shade grown beans that are single country origin.

                                I like these brands of coffee (which tend to run about $10/lb):

                                Gimme Coffee - Buy - Coffee

                                Jim's Organic Coffee roasts only the very finest certified organic coffee.

                                Coffee | Equal Exchange

                                I used to use a french press for many years, but I absolutely hate french press coffee (tastes harsh to me) now that I'm used to using my stovetop espresso moka, which makes a very smooth, dark cup of coffee. The Bialetti brand is the original moka (and as a bonus, is made in the teeny tiny town in Italy where my husband is from). A three cup size will yield about 3 oz of coffee, which is the equivalent to 3 cups for them in Italy (I drink it as one small cup's worth).

                                Amazon.com: Bialetti 6799 Moka Express 3-Cup Stovetop Espresso Maker: Home & Kitchen
                                Last edited by BestBetter; 03-14-2013, 04:28 PM.

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