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  • The sugar addict

    I'm sure most everyone on this board has noticed this, but I think it's worth commenting on. Ever since I gave up any form of added sugar/bread it's been incredibly easy to say no to the desserts that I once devoured to no end. They aren't even appetizing. But that's not exactly what I am commenting on.

    Has anyone else became increasingly aware to how others act about sugar? How they get immediately excited at the thought of dessert? How they endlessly justify their consumption of processed sugar to no end? It's eye-opening how truly addicting sugar can be to some people. And I only began to notice this once I gave up the sugar myself. I recall trying to use my willpower to say no to a second or third brownie, but it literally wouldn't work. My brain would take over no matter how hard I tried to say no. Endless justifications would run through my head, making their case for "just one more little sweet". Now, it doesn't even cross my mind to even eat a dessert. And on the rare occasions (weddings/birthdays/celebrations) that I feel inclined to have something, it doesn't trigger that same brain stimulation that it once did. And desserts have became unpalatable to me, anyway, so when I do eat them, it's in a very small amount.

    Anyway, has anyone else observed this sugar addiction? Anybody have any funny comments on it?

  • #2
    Yes, the same thing has finally happened to me with artificial sweeteners. I used to drink lots of Sprite zero and now it tastes barely edible. Still trying to get to the same point with sugar.

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    • #3
      Nothing funny to add but I will say that it's been so much easier to get past my own sugar addiction this time around. In the past I've "given up sugar" for a set time but allowed myself little cheats--honey or agave or date sugar.

      This time I'm not even eating fruit for a short time because I realized how I was using sugar as a drug--when I felt overwhelmed, sad, angry, etc., I would reach for a piece of chocolate or a spoonful of ice cream. And I'm not having a sugar-less dessert every night. And it is so much easier this way.

      I'm almost a month in. The first few days were rough. But the other night I sat on the couch while my husband ate really nice chocolate (better than Jaques Torres, he said, which is my fave) and didn't even want any. I mean not even at all.

      But I'm on a other food tracking site and it is funny to see people commenting about giving up sugar. In most cases they are still eating it. Or spending a lot of time figuring out how to still eat something sweet.

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      • #4
        Interestingly, despite having a voracious sweet-tooth, I never found artificial sweeteners to be palatable.

        I have a side question though: my mom recently gave up drinking diet drinks and claimed to lose 6lbs. Is there any known mechanism in which artificial sweeteners are hydrated in your body, causing you to retain water and thus, bloat?

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        • #5
          I also went on autopilot when something sugary hit my tongue. I can't stand the "it's so unnecessary to five up whole food groups--everything in moderation" comments you see all over the place.

          If this works for you, bravo. You are probably making yourself sick but at least you imagine yourself to be in control. But is is simply not possible for most of us.

          I have read that artificial sweeteners make you hungry and can also make you gain weight through a chemical process.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Beets View Post
            Nothing funny to add but I will say that it's been so much easier to get past my own sugar addiction this time around. In the past I've "given up sugar" for a set time but allowed myself little cheats--honey or agave or date sugar.

            This time I'm not even eating fruit for a short time because I realized how I was using sugar as a drug--when I felt overwhelmed, sad, angry, etc., I would reach for a piece of chocolate or a spoonful of ice cream. And I'm not having a sugar-less dessert every night. And it is so much easier this way.

            I'm almost a month in. The first few days were rough. But the other night I sat on the couch while my husband ate really nice chocolate (better than Jaques Torres, he said, which is my fave) and didn't even want any. I mean not even at all.

            But I'm on a other food tracking site and it is funny to see people commenting about giving up sugar. In most cases they are still eating it. Or spending a lot of time figuring out how to still eat something sweet.
            Beets, glad to see you're having some success in giving up sugar. I'm about half a year in, and it gets crazy easy to deny the treats after this long.

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            • #7
              Thanks! I never thought I'd feel this way.

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              • #8
                Hi, my name is Mouse and I'm a recovering sugar addict. I also made my own t-shirts saying so.

                Anyway, I'm not here to advertise. I have a huge problem with sugar and desserts. If they are present or nearby (even if I see a menu item describing the dessert) I will need to eat it. Once I eat it, it's no longer there to bother me. Sad, eh??

                It's especially difficult when traveling for work and eating at restaurants. I was once able to kick this habit when I followed the candida diet (Yeastbusters) and ended up like you - finally free from the heroin-like pull. It felt so great to be free...and now I'm fighting to get back to that stage. This shit should be outlawed. (Rolling my eyes because I realize this is MY problem. not the government's lol)
                Ramblings of an Unamused Mouse (Lots of Food Porn, Too!)

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                • #9
                  I wouldn't say I was ever addicted. But I certainly find the temptation so minimal I don't indulge. But it's the same with other foods, too. If my boyfriend gets hungry at midnight and cooks up some bacon, I'm not tempted then either.

                  Totally, totally noticing how hard everyone around us in public seems to be working to eat more carbs.

                  My girlfriend is eating a CW weight loss diet, carefully increasing her intake to compensate for calories burned with chronic cardio. Her goal is 60% carbs. She is convinced that cutting down her carbs would mean giving up vegetables, because most of her carbs are consumed as vegetables.

                  Except that 90% of her carbs are as grains or fruit, which she eats a lot of. Totally in denial, and pre-diabetic.

                  She thinks what I am doing is crazy, and asks if I intend to keep doing it after reaching my goal. Sad.
                  Last edited by eKatherine; 03-03-2013, 10:12 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I think my husband is a sugar addict. Fortunately he doesn't eat junk food, but he will eat natural treats and chocolate. He occasionally gets a halvah bar at the health food store, these aren't the good kind you can get at a Middle Eastern market but the " healthy" kind made with brown rice syrup. The last time he got one he said it wasn't that good but still he wants to get one when ever he has a chance, the same goes with other sweets. I think it is just habit; he remembers enjoying them so even though he no longer really likes them he still considers them to be a treat.
                    Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                    • #11
                      I personally think there is a sliding scale of desire. On one end is "no desire", and the other "addiction". Also on the scale but not reaching the level of "addicted" I see "user" and "habitual user". "Addiction" implies out-of-control despite major problems it causes.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Future_PB_Dr View Post
                        I have a side question though: my mom recently gave up drinking diet drinks and claimed to lose 6lbs. Is there any known mechanism in which artificial sweeteners are hydrated in your body, causing you to retain water and thus, bloat?
                        I have heard on a bunch of podcasts (Robb Wolf, Everyday Paleo etc) that just the taste of the something sweet can stimulate insulin production. I think the experiment cited involved runners swilling their mouths out with artificially sweetened water and then being able to carry on running for longer.

                        Plus, soft drinks contain salt (to make your thirstier and thus drink more), so this may be a factor also.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by eKatherine View Post
                          I personally think there is a sliding scale of desire. On one end is "no desire", and the other "addiction". Also on the scale but not reaching the level of "addicted" I see "user" and "habitual user". "Addiction" implies out-of-control despite major problems it causes.
                          Good point. I think Hubby is more of a habitual user.
                          Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

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                          • #14
                            Not a big sugar lover, though I have my days. However, put me in an Italian deli, and I'll show you a fat eater. I believe in both moderation and a lower carb way of eating. Given a choice between a sweet and some good cheese, I'd choose the cheese every time. OTOH, if pizza were good for me, I'd eat it a lot.

                            Recently when I want something sweet, I mix cocoa powder into some ricotta or cream cheese with some artificial sweetener. I think the last time was about a month ago. I think of it as mock pudding.
                            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                            B*tch-lite

                            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Urban Forager View Post
                              He occasionally gets a halvah bar at the health food store, these aren't the good kind you can get at a Middle Eastern market but the " healthy" kind made with brown rice syrup. The last time he got one he said it wasn't that good but still he wants to get one when ever he has a chance, the same goes with other sweets.
                              This is an awesome example.

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