Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Extraordinary Science of Junk Food - NYTimes

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The Extraordinary Science of Junk Food - NYTimes

    This is nothing we don't already know, those of us who kick around the paleo and primal world a lot. :P But this article was a good solid read all the same, and one I wish people I know would read.

    The Extraordinary Science of Junk Food - NYTimes
    yay!

  • #2
    Thanks for posting this. It is a good read. Nothing surprising, but it certainly hammers home how BigFood isn't about food at all. It's about selling tasty garbage.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

    Comment


    • #3
      Really good read. Will further eliminate any desire to cheat a little with some processed crap.

      fta:
      In Coke’s headquarters in Atlanta, the biggest consumers were referred to as “heavy users.” “The other model we use was called ‘drinks and drinkers,’ ” Dunn said. “How many drinkers do I have? And how many drinks do they drink? If you lost one of those heavy users, if somebody just decided to stop drinking Coke, how many drinkers would you have to get, at low velocity, to make up for that heavy user? The answer is a lot. It’s more efficient to get my existing users to drink more.”
      cuz screw those poison pushers

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow, good read. I am only part way through. Thanks for sharing that. I love a good exposé, and on a topic I enjoy, it's even better.
        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm only a couple of pages in, but I want to print the following part and tape it to the refrigerators in my office.

          ...General Mills had overtaken not just the cereal aisle but other sections of the grocery store. The company’s Yoplait brand had transformed traditional unsweetened breakfast yogurt into a veritable dessert. It now had twice as much sugar per serving as General Mills’ marshmallow cereal Lucky Charms. And yet, because of yogurt’s well-tended image as a wholesome snack, sales of Yoplait were soaring, with annual revenue topping $500 million. Emboldened by the success, the company’s development wing pushed even harder, inventing a Yoplait variation that came in a squeezable tube — perfect for kids. They called it Go-Gurt and rolled it out nationally in the weeks before the C.E.O. meeting. (By year’s end, it would hit $100 million in sales.)
          So many of the women I work with have cases of flavored fat-free Yoplait in the fridge and eat 2 or 3 a day, talking about the probiotics and how they're only 90 Calories each. *face-palm*
          >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
          >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

          >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
          >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

          Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MissJecka View Post
            I'm only a couple of pages in, but I want to print the following part and tape it to the refrigerators in my office.



            So many of the women I work with have cases of flavored fat-free Yoplait in the fridge and eat 2 or 3 a day, talking about the probiotics and how they're only 90 Calories each. *face-palm*
            Yep... you just described my MIL to a "T". She's about 70 pounds overweight, too. My husband and I tried to get his parents (and mine) to read PB, but to no avail... gotta have all that fat-free yoplait though!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
              Wow, good read. I am only part way through. Thanks for sharing that. I love a good exposé, and on a topic I enjoy, it's even better.
              I particularly enjoyed the section where they talk about how the products are specifically formulated NOT to provide satiation.
              eg:
              This contradiction is known as “sensory-specific satiety.” In lay terms, it is the tendency for big, distinct flavors to overwhelm the brain, which responds by depressing your desire to have more. Sensory-specific satiety also became a guiding principle for the processed-food industry. The biggest hits — be they Coca-Cola or Doritos — owe their success to complex formulas that pique the taste buds enough to be alluring but don’t have a distinct, overriding single flavor that tells the brain to stop eating.

              Comment


              • #8
                Holy hell, I'm loving this article more and more. I'm actually struggling to stifle my desire to exclaim, "Dear god!!!" at my desk right now.

                When I asked Geoffrey Bible, former C.E.O. of Philip Morris, about this shift toward more salt, sugar and fat in meals for kids, he smiled and noted that even in its earliest incarnation, Lunchables was held up for criticism. “One article said something like, ‘If you take Lunchables apart, the most healthy item in it is the napkin.’
                >> Current Stats: 90% Primal / 143 lbs / ~25% BF
                >> Goal (by 1 Jan 2014): 90% Primal / 135-ish pounds / 20-22% BF

                >> Upcoming Fitness Feats: Tough Mudder, June 2013
                >> Check out my super-exciting journal by clicking these words.

                Weight does NOT equal health -- ditch the scale, don't be a slave to it!

                Comment


                • #9
                  These guys are truly evil magicians! What kind of society lets these creeps have access to children? When you see the kind of money and research that goes into developing these products you realize how crucial it is to keep kids away from their products as long as you can. Palette preferences are formed early so if a child develops a taste for a certain manufactured food then they can become life long consumers which is just what the industry wants.
                  Life is death. We all take turns. It's sacred to eat during our turn and be eaten when our turn is over. RichMahogany.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Bizarrely, this all reminds me of the seventh season of Supernatural. Basically, creatures called Leviathan were using a food to turn humans into an apathetic, obedient, obese food source. During that whole storyline, I kept thinking, "how is this different from what's actually happening?"
                    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                    B*tch-lite

                    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I just came here to post a link to this article! Amazing read. Really ought to to help me stop eating any sort of junk food....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by specsAreGrok View Post
                        I particularly enjoyed the section where they talk about how the products are specifically formulated NOT to provide satiation.
                        eg:
                        This contradiction is known as “sensory-specific satiety.” In lay terms, it is the tendency for big, distinct flavors to overwhelm the brain, which responds by depressing your desire to have more. Sensory-specific satiety also became a guiding principle for the processed-food industry. The biggest hits — be they Coca-Cola or Doritos — owe their success to complex formulas that pique the taste buds enough to be alluring but don’t have a distinct, overriding single flavor that tells the brain to stop eating.
                        I was just going to copy and paste this very part. Still reading...
                        Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm glad you guys enjoyed it as much as I did!

                          Yeah the Yoplait thing really made my head spin a bit. I used to love Yoplait, it was my favorite brand, though I never got too into the fancy dessert combo flavors I loved their peach, lemon, and cherry.

                          I wouldn't touch any of it these days with a 20 foot pole, lol. >.<

                          I posted this article on Facebook as well, and my co-worker actually read it. Then he basically brought up to me that he understands why the companies do it, because profit is more important than anything else. And I'm like, yeah, totally. We are in business, they are in business, everything is a business and we all need to make money. But making money at the expense of the health of others is incredibly unethical, and it is scary that it is allowed to continue despite the fact that they teach things like business ethics and social responsibility in most business and marketing classes at the college level. (I am taking such a class right now, and the text book has quite a few chapters devoted specifically to ethics in marketing.)

                          Same co worker is mostly amusedly tolerated regarding all my dietary stuff. He hates all vegetables and eats nothing but meat, crackers, soda, and candy bars. xD He is very fit despite this.
                          yay!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I am that naive person that believes selling a quality healthy product to a customer means you both get value. The customer gets that healthy product, and you get their money. That would be a type of ambition.

                            Selling garbage and trying to make your customer so sick that they crave (as in drug addiction) your product is different. Then the customer gets no value, but you still get their money. That would be a type of greed.

                            The business community has allowed itself to become morally bankrupt. Lazy consumers are almost as much to blame. I tend to forgive ignorance (the consumers that buy this crap) slightly more than I forgive stealing money from ignorant people. YMMV.

                            It may never turn around, but hopefully, with Vegetarians/Vegans, Primals/Paleos, hippies, off-the-grid-ers, etc., we'll all make a dent.
                            "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                            B*tch-lite

                            Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                              Selling garbage and trying to make your customer so sick that they crave (as in drug addiction) your product is different. Then the customer gets no value, but you still get their money.
                              That's not quite true though. The customer gets convenience, tastiness, and can subsist on the junk easily. It's just that we place a much higher value on nutritious food than they do. And we have a different idea of what healthy food is.
                              Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                              Griff's cholesterol primer
                              5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                              Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                              TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                              bloodorchid is always right

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X