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  • Using PB/Paleo in a medical setting

    Hi all,

    I am relatively new to the forum as this is my first thread, but I believe I have a worthwhile (broad) question that the collective knowledge of this forum could help me with. My question is: as a student entering my first year of medical school this upcoming fall, how can I incorporate the core principles of the PB into my future as (tentatively) a cardiologist or general practician? I fear that I will have trouble battling with the mandates of CW. Are there any practicing doctors out there that could offer some input on this? Or perhaps any individuals that have been patients in a setting where PB principles were conveyed as preventive measures and maybe even more effective 'medicine' than the side-effect-laden medicines that are out today? Also, maybe there are sources you know of that speak of various physicians going against the grain and using principles representative of the PB. I understand this is not a very direct question, but any input would be appreciated.

  • #2
    check out Dr. Cate Shanahan. reducing inflammation is a major point in her practice, she keeps a blog, and i wouldn't be the least bit surprised that she would be willing to mentor a med student, even from a distance.
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread60178.html

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    • #3
      Thanks, Primalrob. Looks like a great resource. I appreciate it!

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      • #4
        Check out (if you haven't already):

        Wheat Belly Blog | Lose the Wheat Lose the Weight

        He's a cardiologist.
        Some people just need a sympathetic pat... On the head... With a hammer.

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        • #5
          There is actually a site called Paleo Physicians Network and you can register on that when you graduate so they are out there!! Good luck with your medical career you will have a great impact.

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          • #6
            I'm a third year dealing with some of the issues you mentioned. I got some good feedback from the forum on this thread:

            http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread75867.html

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            • #7
              Any chance you think you'll move to TN when you graduate? :P I've spent the entire day today trying to find a good doctor, and when I thought I had hit the jackpot (an integrative medicine center) the only doctor accepting new patients is already booked up until 2014. ::sigh:: I have an appointment with a chiropractor/naturopath next week but I'm thinking about canceling it. I just need blood work and the ability to get Rx strength heme iron and maybe thyroid meds if my bloodwork comes out like I think it will.

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              • #8
                @meeshar

                At risk of sounding like a cynic, there is no secret information that a doctor knows that you can't access. As someone who is approaching the end of medical school, I can tell you that (for general health issues) most doctors really just regurgitate what they read in guidebooks or, more commonly, websites like Medscape or UpToDate. Most doctors don't read specific articles in the literature or have access to special information the public can't access.

                I'm not trying to disparage the medical field. The average lay person cannot interpret an xray, remove a gallbladder, or manage sudden loss of blood pressure on the wards. But the average person is more than capable of understanding and interpreting the results of basic blood work (CBC, CMP, lipids, etc..).

                If you're sick or feel unwell, you need to see a doctor. If you're generally healthy, you really just need a doctor to order the lab tests for you. There's no secret sauce. A good deal of the dietary/lifestyle advice doctors give is completely wrong.
                Last edited by ulnauy; 02-08-2013, 07:47 PM.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for all the input guys. I appreciate it.

                  AuroraB - I have read most of this book but was not aware of the blog, thanks!
                  Lucy - sounds cool, hopefully I can remember that eight years down the line
                  Ulnauy - I looked into the thread. There's some great stuff on there, thanks for pointing me in that direction. And I don't think you sound like a cynic. It's the truth. I feel that doctors are too often given too much credit. Many doctors' lack of attention to the current research and literature is irresponsible given the weight of their decisions, which are seen as the be-all-end-all to many patients that don't know any better.
                  Meeshar - sorry, TN probably isn't in my future, but good luck in finding a good doctor!

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                  • #10
                    Just curious, do any of you think there is any background movement going on that will change the face of medicine in the next ten years (as far as the maladies associated with metabolic syndrome go and how we are currently treating them...)? Do you think the success people have on a LCHF (Paleo) diet will begin to be widely recognized?
                    Last edited by Future_PB_Dr; 02-09-2013, 07:57 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Cutting down on carbs, especially sugars, has become fairly well accepted. But whole grains are still strongly emphasized. I have yet to meet an attending who did not preach the benefits of whole grains. High-fat is anathema. 98% of doctors still believe the amount of cholesterol you eat affects your lipid profile (despite conclusive studies otherwise). Telling patients to throw away egg yolks and strictly avoid saturated fats is commonplace.

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                      • #12
                        So do these doctors base their ideas that high-fat is anathema on the prejudice of what they learned in medical school? Do you feel that many of them actually care about the matter or are just comfortable collecting a paycheck rewarded for spreading antiquated knowledge and practices? I guess I just don't understand how the medical community cannot view the spreading epidemic of obesity as a failure on their own parts, given the increasing data and knowledge suggesting that CW is highly flawed.

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                        • #13
                          Your problem is not as bad as the students who know Austrian Economics but have to get a Ph.D. in economics from an Ivy league school, or almost any mainline University. They have to study, learn, and mimic what they know is wong and hate. At least you don't have to do that. It could be worse.
                          "When the search for truth is confused with political advocacy, the pursuit of knowledge is reduced to the quest for power." - Alston Chase

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                          • #14
                            Hey there!

                            I have worked in health care for over 10 years as an aide and I have been a RN for over 6 years (and worked for a pharmaceutical company for a bit) and I can tell you, trying to introduce PB into practice is quite...frustrating. You can say whatever you feel like but be prepared to have your colleagues laugh at you and not back you up. This is especially hard when you are trying to establish yourself. Honestly, try to find a really great Dietitian that is onboard with PB and refer your patients to them when you can. Do your research, but unless it's a double-blind trial performed by a big name, everyone will discredit it. And be aware that Pharm companies run hospitals and doctors (most of the budget of a hospital goes to drugs, not workers, etc...and what's that Dr.? Let me take you to lunch and give you free trips, just so you can trial/push our drugs, please...), so just keep that in mind...No I'm not jaded, just sick of people being their own worst enemy and our current medical system perpetuating it... :P You will have better luck as a GP for pushing PB as it's your own practice, but if you are going to specialize in a hospital (such as a cardiologist) you will have to get on board with their routines/practices (aka drugs)...no hospital wants a "quack" unless you already have years of amazing results behind you. Good luck tho, we need trailblazers to correct the sad state of our reactive instead of preventive healthcare.

                            Also, the amount of info medical professionals get on nutrition is extremely sad. As a nurse, we actually get more info, but it's still all CW. EXCEPT I have met a handful of Dietitians that are turning to PB. These will be your best resources, I can not advocate them enough. Take a couple of extra courses if you are able. Educate your fellow students if you can, and advocate the mind set of a health care TEAM for your patients (including physiotherapists, home care, etc), not a physician-run group. This way the needs of a patient are met wholistically from every angle, and perhaps be more preventative (can the person get PB friendly "meals-on-wheels" if unable to leave their home prior to surgery, etc?).

                            Sorry for such a long response, you hit close to home for me...
                            Last edited by JungleJane; 02-10-2013, 01:23 AM.

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                            • #15
                              I appreciate the response, JungleJane. And by no means do I think you are jaded; I would be surprised to find anyone on this forum that would think otherwise, given the current discrepancy between what works and CW. And as I have already alluded to, that is going to be my biggest fear going into medicine. However, I love your idea of surrounding myself with wholistic resources for my patients. Too often, it seems, people are frustrated to failure simply because they are given so many differing opinions that they don't know who to listen to. My ultimate goal is to give my patients truth; I know not all will listen, but I've never been one to feel the conviction that I need to please everyone I cross paths with, so I am okay with that. As long as I get through to a few people, maybe that will get the ball rolling toward a change from CW to debunked medicine.

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