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Maybe we ought to rethink our consumption of Quinoa

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  • Maybe we ought to rethink our consumption of Quinoa

    "But there is an unpalatable truth to face for those of us with a bag of quinoa in the larder. The appetite of countries such as ours for this grain has pushed up prices to such an extent that poorer people in Peru and Bolivia, for whom it was once a nourishing staple food, can no longer afford to eat it. Imported junk food is cheaper. In Lima, quinoa now costs more than chicken. Outside the cities, and fuelled by overseas demand, the pressure is on to turn land that once produced a portfolio of diverse crops into quinoa monoculture."

    from:Can vegans stomach the unpalatable truth about quinoa? | Joanna Blythman | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

    What do the rest of you think?
    Ruth

    See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

  • #2
    Interesting. I limit my quinoa intake to adding a tablespoon or two for crunch in some dishes. Perhaps once I've finished what's left in my cabinet, I'll just skip it. I've never really found it yummy enough to eat on its own.
    "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

    B*tch-lite

    Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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    • #3
      I stopped eating the stuff 2 yrs ago when I went primal as quinoa is also high in lectins and best avoided for those of us who have auto- immune issues.

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      • #4
        I read this article recently. A lot of people came back and said, "That's why I try to buy US-grown foods!"

        Well, it's a start, anyway.
        Depression Lies

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        • #5
          This article is beyond economically illiterate. Higher demand for quinoa = more money for folks in the quinoa business. And if peruvians are choosing to replace soil-friendly crop rotation with quinoa monoculture, then that's their problem. Buying a bag of quinoa in the U.S. doesn't magically force south americans to make stupid decisions.

          And it seems like this economic ignorance is driven by nutritional ignorance. I find it difficult to give any shits about peruvians not being able to afford quinoa when they have access to things that are equally if not more nutritious, like rice and beans. If you believe quinoa is a "superfood" or otherwise a substantial source of protein and nutrients, then it becomes a cause for concern. But you'd be wrong.
          Last edited by Chaohinon; 01-28-2013, 11:25 AM.
          “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

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          • #6
            Easy solution: Don't eat it in the first place.
            Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
            Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
            Current weight: 210.8 lbs
            Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

            The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
            ChooseMyPlate

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Chaohinon View Post
              This article is beyond economically illiterate. Higher demand for quinoa = more money for folks in the quinoa business. And if peruvians are choosing to replace soil-friendly crop rotation with quinoa monoculture, then that's their problem. Buying a bag of quinoa in the U.S. doesn't magically force south americans to make stupid decisions.

              And it seems like this economic ignorance is driven by nutritional ignorance. I find it difficult to give any shits about peruvians not being able to afford quinoa when they have access to things that are equally if not more nutritious, like rice and beans. If you believe quinoa is a "superfood" or otherwise a substantial source of protein and nutrients, then it becomes a cause for concern. But you'd be wrong.
              I think I am in serious like, at the moment.
              Female, age 51, 5' 9"
              SW - 183 (Jan 22, 2012), CW - 159, GW - healthy.

              Met my 2012 goals by losing 24 pounds.
              2013 goals are to get fit and strong!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Chaohinon View Post
                This article is beyond economically illiterate. Higher demand for quinoa = more money for folks in the quinoa business. And if peruvians are choosing to replace soil-friendly crop rotation with quinoa monoculture, then that's their problem.
                It depends on which Peruvians we're talking about. I'm sure the big land owners are getting rich. And I don't think all Peruvians are making this choice.

                Often in these parts we bemoan the agribusiness model that has uprooted small farmers, killed crop diversity and made for crummy food. Same thing.

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                • #9
                  I don't know why anyone would start eating it to begin with. :P
                  yay!

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                  • #10
                    I actually just had some quinoa recently. I grew up in Peru but my family didn't really consume it (so it's not really a staple for all Peruvians, we lived close to Lima, so it's probably more for those that are closer to the source). I wanted to give it a go and I liked it, it doesn't seem to have much of a taste on its own - and I much prefer white rice if I'm looking for something like that, but I liked that it had some protein to go with it.
                    I used to seriously post here, now I prefer to troll.

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                    • #11
                      iniQuity

                      Originally posted by iniQuity View Post
                      I grew up in Peru ....
                      we lived close to Lima,
                      Totally off topic, but my son is in Peru right now. He and 2 friends took their surfboards and backpacks and are there till April 2. They spent a week in Lima but left in search of better waves and took a bus to Mancora today.

                      Back on topic: Maybe I'll ask him if he's had any quinoa yet.
                      "Be careful what you pretend to be because you are what you pretend to be." Kurt Vonnegut
                      "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by." Douglas Adams
                      "Moderation sucks." Suse
                      "Wine is a vegetable." Meaty
                      "Every decision you make, from what you eat to what you do with your time tonight, turns you into who you are tomorrow and the day after that." Cmdr Chris Hadfield


                      Winencandy

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                      • #12
                        How 'bout an article on the other side of things.
                        Quinoa bad for Bolivian and Peruvian farmers? Ignore the media hand-wringing. - Slate Magazine
                        “You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.”
                        ~Friedrich Nietzsche
                        And that's why I'm here eating HFLC Primal/Paleo.

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                        • #13
                          Wow -- Thanks for all the responses! As usual, an issue like this is more complicated than it seems at first glance. I tend to have free market views, and appreciate the rebuttals to the opening article. But I'm also learning more about the importance of buying local -- although that isn't always possible. However, in a global economy, with transportation getting easier and faster, "local" is becoming a wider and wider area. I now live in Wisconsin, but the other day I was shopping at a neighborhood food co-op and bought a bag of organic onions. When I got them home, I realized they were shipped from Sedro-Woolley, Washington (state) -- the small town I went to high school in! That certainly felt "local!"
                          Ruth

                          See my journal, The Balancing Act: Integrating Primal into My Life, for menu plans, musings, and more.

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                          • #14
                            Also a note for anyone eating Primal/Paleo due to Celiac or auto immune issues...read an article recently that said that they got around to testing Quinoa for an auto immune response in Celiacs (most likely because it's a common grain that Celiacs use in their diets). There are 18 varieties of Quinoa - you will never be told which you are eating, as they are never labeled. Of the 18 varieties, 4 of them produced a clear response in Celiacs (and most likely this would pertain to gluten sensitive people too). So, yet another reason to just eliminate the grains.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cori93437 View Post
                              That article doesn't refute anything, it just soft-peddles the down side.

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