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  • Hair Color Returning

    I am 48 and have been grey since my late 30s, really I have been turning grey since I was in my 20s. When I became a Grandma 5 years ago, I stopped coloring my hair and I am lucky to have pretty grey hair. I have been Paleo/Primal for about 10 months. In that time, I have also stopped using shampoo, and I seldom use any other hair product or even soap. I spend less than five minutes on my very short hair a day, if that. And, I don't smoke or hang out with people who smoke.

    One day last October, a co-worker frowned at my head and asked me if I was coloring my hair again. She said it looked blond. I didn't believe her until I really looked at my hair in the mirror and it did look more blond. My hair had lots of different colors, as happens when a blond turns grey, so you can imagine my surprise when I realized the primary color was once again blond. It wasn't a real strong blond, more like the white blond I was when I was very young. As I was telling my husband about it, and he was agreeing that it was blond again, I looked at his mostly grey beard and realized it was getting darker. My stylist noticed the return of color and had a difficult time believing it was natural.

    I don't have any allusions of my hair ever being as blond as it was before I started coloring it, I am just amazed that any color has returned.

    Has anyone else experienced this or heard of it?

  • #2
    I actually read the same thing on another thread here - someone said they used to have some grey hairs and they had disappeared. Go you!
    "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

    In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

    - Ray Peat

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    • #3
      OMG, I hope this happens to me!! I was 23 when I saw my first grey! Here's hoping it goes away!!

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      • #4
        Copper restores hair color. Retention of copper is important. Eat lots of chocolate, oysters, and a low iron diet and consider cooking with a copper pan instead of an iron one(iron blocks copper absorption, low copper makes iron easily stored)
        Make America Great Again

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        • #5
          in that vein ^ copper peptides are a quick fix to discolored hair
          Make America Great Again

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          • #6
            Same here. Same age as you, went gray same time too. My gray is more like "absence of color" than anything. I quit coloring when we moved to Australia because the sun would fade all that expense right out real quick. In the last year, I've become very light blonde mixed with the gray. It's odd!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Derpamix View Post
              Copper restores hair color. Retention of copper is important. Eat lots of chocolate, oysters, and a low iron diet and consider cooking with a copper pan instead of an iron one(iron blocks copper absorption, low copper makes iron easily stored)
              Interesting. I wonder if a person's ability to store copper determines when they go grey, and if that is genetic? My maternal grandmother still has a lot of dark hair and she's in her early 80's! My mum doesn't have many greys either.

              And then some people go grey from stress. My dad literally went white in the space of a few months when his business went under. My sister grew grey hair when she had her first baby. I wonder if it's cos' stress effects copper absorption?
              "I think the basic anti-aging diet is also the best diet for prevention and treatment of diabetes, scleroderma, and the various "connective tissue diseases." This would emphasize high protein, low unsaturated fats, low iron, and high antioxidant consumption, with a moderate or low starch consumption.

              In practice, this means that a major part of the diet should be milk, cheese, eggs, shellfish, fruits and coconut oil, with vitamin E and salt as the safest supplements."

              - Ray Peat

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by YogaBare View Post
                Interesting. I wonder if a person's ability to store copper determines when they go grey, and if that is genetic? My maternal grandmother still has a lot of dark hair and she's in her early 80's! My mum doesn't have many greys either.

                And then some people go grey from stress. My dad literally went white in the space of a few months when his business went under. My sister grew grey hair when she had her first baby. I wonder if it's cos' stress effects copper absorption?
                "I think the chronic loss of copper accounts for the obvious features of aging, such as the loss of elasticity of the skin, hair, and (in Parkinson's disease) substantia nigra, and for the decrease in respiratory capacity."

                Copper is poorly absorbed when there is excessive stress. Stress harms thyroid production, and thyroid hormone is crucial for copper absorption.
                Make America Great Again

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                • #9
                  yeah, quit coloring when we moved to Australia because the sun would fade all that expense right out real quick,thank you

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                  • #10
                    Wow - this was an eye opener! I've noticed that my roots are not as obvious, even a couple months after my last coloring - I thought my hair had started growing more slowly and was trying to convince myself that was a sign of health!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Derpamix View Post
                      Copper restores hair color. Retention of copper is important. Eat lots of chocolate, oysters, and a low iron diet and consider cooking with a copper pan instead of an iron one(iron blocks copper absorption, low copper makes iron easily stored)
                      Interesting. I got my first grays in my teens. At 44, I'm officially salt-n-pepper.

                      My son (22 y.o.), my brother and my dad are all around the same height, 6'-6'2". But I'm 6'4", so a slight outlier. None of them has gone prematurely gray. As I think about it, one possible explanation of both is that I've always drank (drunken, drinked?) a ton of milk --- iron-rich milk. Maybe this iron/copper dyanmic came into play making me a little taller and a lot grayer?

                      I've cut way back on the milk, even though I still love the stuff. Now I just need to up my oyster, liver and chocolate intake. In no time, I'll be jet black again.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Rojo View Post
                        Interesting. I got my first grays in my teens. At 44, I'm officially salt-n-pepper.

                        My son (22 y.o.), my brother and my dad are all around the same height, 6'-6'2". But I'm 6'4", so a slight outlier. None of them has gone prematurely gray. As I think about it, one possible explanation of both is that I've always drank (drunken, drinked?) a ton of milk --- iron-rich milk. Maybe this iron/copper dyanmic came into play making me a little taller and a lot grayer?

                        I've cut way back on the milk, even though I still love the stuff. Now I just need to up my oyster, liver and chocolate intake. In no time, I'll be jet black again.
                        I don't think so for the milk. It's well documented that calcium inhibits iron absorption.

                        Inhibitory effects of dietary calcium on the initial uptake and subsequent retention of heme and nonheme iron in humans: comparisons using an intestinal lavage method
                        Make America Great Again

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Derpamix View Post
                          I don't think so for the milk. It's well documented that calcium inhibits iron absorption.
                          Ok, it was a shot in the dark.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Rojo View Post
                            Ok, it was a shot in the dark.
                            A.C. Grace Company, Unique E, 120 Softgels - iHerb.com

                            Take vitamin e frequently, eat plenty of copper rich foods, and donate blood. All of these things help reduce oxidation of iron by opposing it directly(same way iron destroys copper, vitamin e, etc)

                            Copper peptides will restore hair color too(I've done this). When I was supplementing sulfur and vitamin c, I found that my hair started becoming a lot lighter and more discolored due to the fact they interfere with copper storage as well.

                            Plus I was megadosing zinc and not eating my liver/oysters.
                            Make America Great Again

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                            • #15
                              have drunk
                              "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                              B*tch-lite

                              Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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