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  • Coffee causing Head Fog?

    I've noticed that I get a head fogginess and sleepy feeling after I drink coffee. Weird, as it's caffeine...

    I drink about 4 cups a day (at the most), slow drinking/sipping on it. I drink one full cup in the morning though, the rest is sipping, but why is it causing this head stuff?

    Anyone else experience this with coffee? I drink it b/c it's warm and tastes good, not necessarily to wake me up or anything, I've never noticed a caffeine affect from coffee.

    Just curious..
    Earthy Mama's Journal

    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" ~ Hippocrates

  • #2
    What kind of coffee do you drink? Do you add anything to it?

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    • #3
      Folgers, but I've gotten it with other brands as well.

      Sometimes it's bulletproof coffee, sometimes it's coconut milk and stevia, sometimes it's coconut oil and stevia, right now it's heavy cream and stevia.

      I've gotten this before I went paleo too, when I used granulated sugar.
      Earthy Mama's Journal

      "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" ~ Hippocrates

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      • #4
        Have you read Dave from bulletproof execs thoughts coffee quality? Have you gone a few days without coffee to see how you feel?

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        • #5
          Folgers is not coffee. I feel yucky when I drink folgers. But a nice whole bean organic brand freshly ground goes over fine. Probably the aflotoxins.
          Crohn's, doing SCD

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          • #6
            I've been reading lately that artificial sweeteners- including stevia (which is what I use) - confuse the body with their sweet taste and still cause your body to release insulin. If that is happening, the insulin may be robbing your body of blood sugar causing you to crash. I'm on the fence about that, because I've read competing studies (other studies say stevia has no effect on insulin and that it even helps you lose weight, so go figure...). I use stevia in my coffee and it doesn't cause me to crash the way I did when I used sugar in my coffee. Then again, it may be the caffeine itself. I've seen several people here that said after they went primal they no longer felt good after consuming caffeine.
            High Weight: 225
            Weight at start of Primal: 189
            Current Weight: 174
            Goal Weight: 130

            Primal Start Date: 11/26/2012

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            • #7
              I have had similar over stimulation cofee experience when I first wet primal. Now I make my coffee on the weakest setting. I've been considering trying Yerba mate tea or green tea instead. But I've become accustom to the whoosh effect on the bowels, which seems to clear most of the brain fog…

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              • #8
                I've never had the head fog, but I do have a friend who, when his son was diagnosed with ADD didn't want him to take ritalin (sp?) and gave him coffee instead. He swore it calmed the boy down. So, maybe you have an upside down reaction to coffee also?

                And, not to be harsh, but most of the coffees in grocery stores are not that great. If you have a Costco card, you can find organic coffee in the warehouses reasonably priced. Also, if you live in an area where drinking higher end coffee isn't a thing, you might actually get fresher beans ordering online. Amazon has a bunch of organic coffees.
                "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                B*tch-lite

                Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

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                • #9
                  My headache has just now subsided, finally....

                  Folgers... yea, it's chemicals in a can LOL! I'm going to forgo the coffee and stevia for a few days.

                  I'll see if stevia has an effect on me by eating it with strawberries. I've been reading lately that stevia might not be all that good for you.
                  Earthy Mama's Journal

                  "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" ~ Hippocrates

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by kot View Post
                    I've become accustom to the whoosh effect on the bowels, which seems to clear most of the brain fog…
                    I stopped drinking coffee 3 weeks ago, and now drink herbal tea (caffeine free) just to have something warm to drink.
                    I still get a woosh in the morning. Not as intense as coffee, but pretty close.

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                    • #11
                      Caffeine is a vasoconstrictor, and therefore decreases blood flow to the brain (and other areas). The short-term effect may be extra energy and focus, but long-term it is harmful. Maybe this is what you are experiencing?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MudLily View Post
                        Caffeine is a vasoconstrictor, and therefore decreases blood flow to the brain (and other areas). The short-term effect may be extra energy and focus, but long-term it is harmful. Maybe this is what you are experiencing?
                        Caffeine is metabolized into more than 25 metabolites in humans, mainly Paraxanthine, Theobromine, and Theophylline [12] Caffeine metabolism yields paraxanthine as a final product, which represents 72 to 80% of caffeine metabolism. There are five main metabolic pathways which contribute to caffeine metabolism in adults [13, 14]. The first three consist of demethylization of N-3 to form Paraxanthine, N-1 to form Theophylline (vasodilator, increased cerebral and muscular blood flow), and N-7 to form Theophylline (vascular, bronchiole, muscular, and respiratory relaxant). The hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) isoenzyme metabolizes most of the caffeine (95%) by three demethylizations which on average give an in vivo metabolism percentage of 85% paraxanthine, 10% theobromine, and 5% theophylline [15]. The fourth pathway results in the formation of uracil metabolites, and the fifth consists of renal elimination of the remaining percentage of caffeine that was not able to be degraded in the process. The large interindividual differences observed in plasmatic concentration of caffeine following the administration of an equal dose are mainly due to variations in metabolism. These variations depend on four factors: genetic polymorphisms, metabolic induction and inhibition of cytochrome P-450, individual (weight, sex), and the presence of hepatic diseases [14] Caffeine is absorbed rapidly and completely from the intestinal tract, making it 100% bioavailable. The time in which maximum plasmatic concentration is obtained (Tmax) is 30–45 minutes [11, 14, 16, 17] fasting and is delayed with food ingestion; it has an average metabolic half life in humans of 2.5 to 4.5 hours [18]

                        Caffeine, by acting on the VSMC, generates a minimal initial contraction and then a significant vasodilator effect. There are various mechanisms that explain these effects.

                        Caffeine, by competitively blocking the adenosine receptors, increases its plasmatic concentration [64] which increases its systemic effects. At a systemic level, adenosine stimulates the chemoreceptor distributed throughout the circulation, causing a generalized increase in sympathetic tone, with an increase in circulating catecholamines, peripheral vascular resistance, and renin secretion [44, 65]. Several studies have documented an increase in systolic arterial pressure of 6 to 7.5 mmHg and 2.6 to 4 mmHg in diastolic pressure 60 minutes after the administration of 300 mg of caffeine (equivalent to drinking a triple espresso) [18, 43]. In spite of this “indirect” vasoconstrictor effect produced by caffeine, it is important to point out that the chronic consumption of caffeine creates a tolerance to its adenosine receptor-dependent effects. Chronic blocking of the adenosine receptors, inducing “upregulation” (an increase in the number and sensitivity) of the receptors has been described with a low-moderate caffeine consumption (approximately two cups of coffee for more than 5 days) [66].
                        Caffeine is a vasodialtor.
                        Make America Great Again

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                        • #13
                          My girlfriend is allergic to caffeine and has similar problems with it, a quad shot of espresso will make her sleepy and put her in a weird mental state.

                          I definitely agree with Knifegill that it might be something to do with the aflatoxins. Any time I've tried Folgers (or similarly crappy brands) I've ended up feeling sick for days, but local whole bean coffee has never bothered me. I'd recommend trying some freshly-ground, whole bean coffee - ideally from a shop that roasts their own on-site if you can find one in your area - and if you continue having the same symptoms, you can probably assume you're allergic. In that case, I recommend switching to rooibos tea, and using a liquid vitamin B12/b complex supplement for energy.
                          “The whole concept of a macronutrient, like that of a calorie, is determining our language game in such a way that the conversation is not making sense." - Dr. Kurt Harris

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                          • #14
                            I had been experiencing these sort of symptoms too, but really never put two and two together that it was my beloved coffee causing me to feel strange until it was suggested to me to cut it out of my diet for a month and then try it again to see how it made me feel. Now if I drink it I feel great for a little while and then I feel kind of cruddy. Could be a caffeine crash I suppose, or it could be something else entirely, I'm really not sure. Unfortunate because I truly love the taste of a high quality cup of coffee.

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