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  • Ceramic-coated pans

    Official Website Of ECOPAN ™ Cookware

    Would you buy this?
    My chocolatey Primal journey

    Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

  • #2
    No I wouldn't. I'm intrinsically turned off by environmentally healthy claims, especially if they're made by a product that's manufactured in China. I'd stick to uncoated metal pans for cooking.
    F 28/5'4/100 lbs

    "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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    • #3
      I have seriously been considering one of these; but, like Damiana, I'm kind of put off by their environmentally friendly claims. For one thing, these pans haven't been on the market for very long, so we don't know what they could potentially do to us.

      I do need new pans, though. I'm still using the non-stick T-Fal that was given to me as a wedding present 5 years ago. I want to get cast iron pans, but can't afford it. I'm hoping I'll get some money this Christmas and can get a new 10" cast iron skillet.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by NewGrayMare View Post
        I have seriously been considering one of these; but, like Damiana, I'm kind of put off by their environmentally friendly claims. For one thing, these pans haven't been on the market for very long, so we don't know what they could potentially do to us.

        I do need new pans, though. I'm still using the non-stick T-Fal that was given to me as a wedding present 5 years ago. I want to get cast iron pans, but can't afford it. I'm hoping I'll get some money this Christmas and can get a new 10" cast iron skillet.
        You can find cast iron pans at re-sale shops.

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        • #5
          No.

          First, the green/recyclable claim is more than a bit misleading. All metal is recyclable. The more coatings and layers you have, the less efficient recycling is, but it is still recyclable. A bigger question is how often items need to be replaced. Recycling costs energy and work (the metal must be cleaned, melted, etc....not cheap). Easy, frequent recycling is LESS "green" than longevity.

          Second, I'm just not a fan of cast aluminum pans, however they are coated. A big part of that is my preference for induction stove tops. If I'm going to buy cookware that can't be used on an induction hob, it'll be copper. I make an exception for camping cookware but that's about it. If I was buying aluminum cookware, I would head to s restaurant supply place where i is plentiful and cheap.

          I'm one of those seasoned cast iron people. I have pans that are older than I am. I don't care how recyclable they are (though as single-metal castings they are highly recyclable) because I expect they will still be usable 100 years from now.

          Originally posted by NewGrayMare View Post
          I want to get cast iron pans, but can't afford it. I'm hoping I'll get some money this Christmas and can get a new 10" cast iron skillet.
          There are two types of cookware encompassed by the term "cast iron". One is fancy enamel-coated cookware typified by La Creuset. The other is bare cast iron typified by Lodge (though Lodge also makes enameled). Enameled cast iron is expensive but apart from cooking acidic foods I don't think it's as good. Seasoned cast iron has a learning curve but is much better for eggs and such.

          Around here I can go to Academy Sporting Goods and buy a 10" cast iron skillet for $15 or so.
          Last edited by Him; 12-22-2012, 10:01 AM.

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          • #6
            I was mainly referring to the ceramic coating, as kind of a non-stick surface that's more natural. I figured that the metals wouldn't even breach unless I do something like scratch the pan.
            My chocolatey Primal journey

            Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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            • #7
              I am happy using a few ceramic based pans I bought in Valencia a few years back for frying and making risottos and paellas.
              F 5 ft 3. HW: 196 lbs. Primal SW (May 2011): 182 lbs (42% BF)... W June '12: 160 lbs (29% BF) (UK size 12, US size 8). GW: ~24% BF - have ditched the scales til I fit into a pair of UK size 10 bootcut jeans. Currently aligning towards 'The Perfect Health Diet' having swapped some fat for potatoes.

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              • #8
                Maybe a dumb question, but...

                What's your reason for wanting a coating? Aren't coatings primarily for low-fat egg cooking? Maybe low-fat cooking in general? That's my understanding. I know they are also used in rice cooker/bread maker pans to allow wiping instead of washing.

                Non-stick isn't as good for browning meat. If you want to make meat sauces or soups you lose the deglazing as well.

                I have an old wok with a ceramic coating. It works fine I guess but honestly I haven't used it that much because the sides are too thin for real heat transfer without a bigger (diameter) flame than I can easily provide.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Rich Capalbo View Post
                  You can find cast iron pans at re-sale shops.
                  You can get cast iron on amazon for 20$.
                  -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Him View Post
                    Maybe a dumb question, but...

                    What's your reason for wanting a coating?
                    I want the ceramic coating so that metals don't leech into my food. I don't want extra iron from cast iron; I eat plenty of iron, and tomatoes to boot. And obviously, I don't want aluminum or stainless steel doing so either.
                    My chocolatey Primal journey

                    Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                    • #11
                      Oh.

                      What sort of pan? I doubt a properly used cast iron skillet actually leaches all that much. The iron would need to migrate through the seasoning layer, and while maybe some can it won't be enough to worry about. A cast iron stew pot, on the other hand, will probably leach quite a bit, especially when you cook acidic foods. I'm not worried about leaching of iron but if I was I'd still use cast iron skillets, grills, etc.

                      IMO for stock pots and the like go with cheap enamel or just use stainless steel. The reason stainless is "stainless" is that it forms a relatively inert and hard oxide layer. That's why stainless can be used to store/transport some harsh chemicals without corrosion. Unless you go insane with the scouring pads you don't have much to worry about either way.

                      As for ceramic, it's going to chip/scratch eventually and then you expose bare aluminum, which you probably don't want.

                      Just my take of course... do what works for you and all that.

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                      • #12
                        Oooo okay. I also get pissed off about always trying to scrub and reseason cast iron pans. I own one, but don't use it much because it's heavy, very large and difficult to wash in my small sink, and always gets stuff stuck in it unless i use 2347843839 Tbsp of cooking fat.

                        I want something "all-in-one" - something i can pan fry lightly and possibly make stock in.

                        Everything eventually chips/scratches, but at least with something with a layer, like the "oxide layer" you mention, it ensures more protection from leaching into my food. And I'd prefer it to be more nonstick just for ease of use, but not exactly teflon.
                        My chocolatey Primal journey

                        Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                        • #13
                          Yeah, that's a vicious cycle.

                          I think cast iron only works for people who have a certain je ne sais qua about them. If you have it they are easy to use, low maintenance, and about as non-stick as anything on the market. If you don't, they're a pain. I wish I knew a way to share whatever magic there is, but I suspect the trick is actually to do less, and that's a hard habit to share.

                          I lack the manual dexterity to make stock in a skillet. The shallow shape lends itself to sloshing and I end up spilling everywhere. It's just not good. And of course trying to use a stock pot as a skillet is a lost cause too because the high walls trap moisture and the food is more steamed than sauteed. So I have a stock pot (actually a pressure cooker in my case, because I live alone and don't need to make huge batches of stock) and skillet, both fairly small (and therefore light and cheaper too). I actually have a whole set of cast iron but 99% of the time I use the 8 or 10 inch (not sure exactly) skillet that lives on the stove. Because the skillet stays fairly dry I don't have to re-season it, and because the stock pot is used for liquids I don't have to worry about food burning to the bottom. I will admit to sometimes pouring some table salt into the cast iron and brushing it around, but usually I just use a paper towel. It would be neat to have an all-in-one but for a klutz like me it's just not feasible.

                          The nice thing about stainless is that the oxide layer reforms on its own eventually. That ceramic coating isn't going to heal itself. My general experience with coated pans (including ceramic, teflon, etc) is bad in that they only seem to last a few years of regular use...but that may be acceptable.

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                          • #14
                            Haha, maybe I should just be more comfortable about having a cast iron always sitting with bits of food on my stovetop xD

                            I do have a stainless steel stock pot, actually. I use it to boil my potatoes and to make stock. It's a good point you make about self-healing products versus ones that you have to always replace. I'll give my cast iron more of a shot, but if I'm still pissed off about it in a month, I'm just going to go buy the ceramic coated stuff from Italy >_>
                            My chocolatey Primal journey

                            Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
                              Oooo okay. I also get pissed off about always trying to scrub and reseason cast iron pans. I own one, but don't use it much because it's heavy, very large and difficult to wash in my small sink, and always gets stuff stuck in it unless i use 2347843839 Tbsp of cooking fat.

                              I want something "all-in-one" - something i can pan fry lightly and possibly make stock in.

                              Everything eventually chips/scratches, but at least with something with a layer, like the "oxide layer" you mention, it ensures more protection from leaching into my food. And I'd prefer it to be more nonstick just for ease of use, but not exactly teflon.

                              Why are you washing cast iron? Heavy, that's called a free workout. Needing 34,717 cubic meters of cooking fat in cast iron, erm yeah you need just enough to cover the cooking surface.

                              I mean, what you want doesn't exist... unless you want to cook on a rock.
                              -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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