Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Any Aspies out there?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Sorry, Knifegill. I didn't mean to offend. And I do understand where you are coming from, and I didn't mean to take the words from your mouth and contort it into something else. It is actually people like you that I admire the most, because you have seen some of the worst despair that humans could ever imagine, and have still come out alive. You would definitely have more understanding than I would ever learn. And probably one of the stronger people I've (sort of) met.

    I think we're on the same page, though. But yeah. Really dislike those who look for handouts in general :\
    My chocolatey Primal journey

    Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by sakura_girl View Post
      +1 Yeah, sounds like an excuse for people to diagnose their lack of openness and treating other people like shit as a disease.
      Well, I was kidding --- kinda.

      I've had online arguments from people on the other end of the political spectrum that have left me scratching my head. It started to occur to me that many of them lacked the ability to think abtractly. You talk about political economy and they start yammering on about their lazy cousin on welfare, etc...

      I'm starting to think I should go a little easier. FTR, I took a Meyers-Briggs test recently and my "type" nailed me to a "T". I agree with knifegill that it's a bit liberating, in the so I'm not lazy/crazy/stupid sense. We're all wired differently.

      Now, to your point, it doesn't give you permission to just give into your diagnosis, i.e. "can't help it -- Aspie!". But it does it give you permission to be a gentle and patient with yourself. That's a good thing.
      Last edited by Rojo; 12-20-2012, 04:26 PM.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Rojo View Post
        Well, I was kidding --- kinda.
        If you are referring to that period when I was snippy and depressed, I agree with you in that I can only hope for people to be openminded and a bit more patient during that period. So yeah, it really depends on the other person's tolerance and openmindedness. Unfortunately, for the masses, the only way to make others patient with you is if they apply an overarching label, such as a disease, that others can also abuse.
        My chocolatey Primal journey

        Unusual food recipes (plus chocolate) blog

        Comment


        • #34
          I see kids like you all the time. They break my heart daily. How wonderful you have overcome. What helped? What didn't? What can I do for those kids to get them to where you are?

          Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
          Who's looking for handouts? What sort of excuse-making lazy scumbag tax-increasing thieves would take a serious condition like autism and exploit it? Sadly, plenty of filthy scoundrels who think they deserve to live for free, they will. And that's sad for people who actually need the help. I'm lucky I was admitted to state residential rehab and taught how to think. I'd be dead otherwise. I DID need the help, ONCE, whereupon I learned how to fish. But fishing class is hard to find, expensive, and there are few qualified teachers. All the smug rich people who talk about teaching a man to fish are the same people who are too busy to teach fishing class. So you've got thieves on both sides, the rich and the poor, and people who want the truth but can't find it stuck in the middle grasping for answers.

          I won't pretend there aren't poor people who abuse the system, I've known some.
          I won't pretend there aren't rich people who help nobody, I've known far more.
          But for those with no grasp on life, I have sympathy. They only want to be happy and find food, maybe warmth. Don't pretend there aren't honest people who just need a little education to learn how to build a life and become productive. Honest people like me get born to useless parents and let out to pasture far too early. I was given up on, a lost cause until I got arrested enough times that a judge offered me rehab. Of course I took it! I wanted to be better. I was that kid begging for money to buy weed and beer. I was so lost and confused I just wanted to numb everything away. Now I know a better life, thanks to tax-funded state rehab. The church never taught me how to live. My parents didn't know how. So rest assured, some of the people who need the help are the same ones getting it.
          You know all those things you wanted to do: You should go do them.

          Age 48
          height 5'3
          SW 215 lbs
          CW 180 lbs (whole foods/primal eating)
          LW 172 lbs
          GW 125ish lbs

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by valmason01 View Post
            This does concern me Drumroll. For many kids the only way they will get help is through the public schools so it will be interesting to see what happens with one more hoop to have to jump through. I love my job and I do it because I truly believe in education. I am not blind to hte problems in the school system however. Most are caused by those making the decisions who have never sat in a classroom and really don't give a damn about anything other than money.

            Oops...sorry. My ongoing rant. In short I agree with you Drumroll, it is concerning. We will just have to wait and see what happens. Thanks for what everyone is saying! It's important and can help others!
            valmason, I agree with you 100%. It's more than a bit ironic that they're making the change right now, just as the local and state governments around the country are tightening their belts. Just as money is becoming scarcer, they've found another creative way to save a few bills. "I know, let's make it harder for people to get the diagnoses they need in order that we don't have to provide services to as many people as we should be!"

            I realize that if you have a diagnoses now, they probably won't strip it from you even if you don't meet the new criteria. It's the future generations that have to contend with the stricter diagnoses criteria that worry me. They won't have access to the services they need. Nobody is asking for a handout, but some of these people who have legitimate need for services will no longer be able to get them.

            Gah, people developing diagnostic criteria should be REQUIRED to have personal experience with Autism, either by dealing with an Autistic family member or being one themselves, not just some guy in a lab coat somewhere who thinks he can pick apart the intricacies of an Autistic's mind and categorize it to everyone.
            "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

            Comment


            • #36
              Wow so much here to consider...

              Now, to your point, it doesn't give you permission to just give into your diagnosis, i.e. "can't help it -- Aspie!". But it does it give you permission to be a gentle and patient with yourself. That's a good thing.
              Yes! I have been around people (adults) who are assholes and will say.."ASpergers! can't help it!". If you are aware enough to know you are an asshole you can help it On the other token, many make themselves miserable because they don't know why they act the way they do. When they understand it they can be patient and loving with themselves and work to make changes.

              Unfortunately, for the masses, the only way to make others patient with you is if they apply an overarching label, such as a disease, that others can also abuse.
              Sad but true. Compassion is not common in the human species.

              Gah, people developing diagnostic criteria should be REQUIRED to have personal experience with Autism, either by dealing with an Autistic family member or being one themselves, not just some guy in a lab coat somewhere who thinks he can pick apart the intricacies of an Autistic's mind and categorize it to everyone.
              Ohhhhh...so much I could say. No one ever should be allowed to make decisions for ANY GROUP of people without having walked a mile in their shoes. Yet they do and consider themselves justified in the doing. They make me very very very angry.
              You know all those things you wanted to do: You should go do them.

              Age 48
              height 5'3
              SW 215 lbs
              CW 180 lbs (whole foods/primal eating)
              LW 172 lbs
              GW 125ish lbs

              Comment


              • #37
                Valmason. I grew up "on a diet". Standard American crap. I was always the tallest person, very active but different. Blah blah blah. I've know my husband since 14 (45 now) so he and I actually able to put lots together for adult history that parent do for their kids.

                Biggest change for me was 1) eating a really breakfast chocked full of protein. Protein has been the best regulator for me. Reading about what grains do, was the next big leap for me. Seriously like trying to get off the crap is like kicking a bad habit. Still affect me sometimes. Like today came home from Christmas shopping. One of sons made taquitos. I hate days where that crap actually smells good.

                Besides protein adding fat to my diet was the other kicker. I feel full. Back in the old days I'd get panicked if I didn't eat on time. Rob would say he thought I actually turned green. The other thing is I don't feel as twitchy. Shopping and eating has become normal for my husband and I now. So it's no big deal. We make the choices and aren't reliant on a parent. I have a cousin whose son has Celiac's and ends up pretty sick sometimes because mom find it too difficult to cook differently for him. Hmmmmm talk about selfish. I thought having to take your son to the hospital is difficult not cooking healthy. IMHO.

                As an adult we choose what comes in the house. Kids eat what's at the table. I know they eat other stuff out of the house, but at least they are making good choices here.

                Since I have the eating down, they next thing my hubby and I are starting to work on is more of the sensory diet. That is the real hard stuff. I do find that the equivalent of lifting heavy things truly helps. That plumb tired out feeling is a real release. For example, I just finished shoveling snow/ and feel terrific where I came home from the store twitchy form all the people and now I feel relaxed.




                Oh and to the people fighting on this thread - go play somewhere else please.
                Julia
                Starting Weight 235 - Dec 1, 2010
                Started Primal Mid January 2011
                Current Weight 183
                Goal 160



                Get Outside Already!

                http://moderndayfitandfood.wordpress.com/
                http://moderndaydesigns.wordpress.com/

                Comment


                • #38
                  So protein regulated behavior, mood, etc....? I have one little guy whose father sends in fruit loops for lunch. Please remember this father really does care and is doing the best he can with what he has which isn't much. As a speech therapist I am not even a nutritionist who can make different suggestions but I am desperate to at least find anecdotals I can share. Thanks so much for being willing to tell your stories!

                  Originally posted by jmday View Post
                  Valmason. I grew up "on a diet". Standard American crap. I was always the tallest person, very active but different. Blah blah blah. I've know my husband since 14 (45 now) so he and I actually able to put lots together for adult history that parent do for their kids.

                  Biggest change for me was 1) eating a really breakfast chocked full of protein. Protein has been the best regulator for me. Reading about what grains do, was the next big leap for me. Seriously like trying to get off the crap is like kicking a bad habit. Still affect me sometimes. Like today came home from Christmas shopping. One of sons made taquitos. I hate days where that crap actually smells good.

                  Besides protein adding fat to my diet was the other kicker. I feel full. Back in the old days I'd get panicked if I didn't eat on time. Rob would say he thought I actually turned green. The other thing is I don't feel as twitchy. Shopping and eating has become normal for my husband and I now. So it's no big deal. We make the choices and aren't reliant on a parent. I have a cousin whose son has Celiac's and ends up pretty sick sometimes because mom find it too difficult to cook differently for him. Hmmmmm talk about selfish. I thought having to take your son to the hospital is difficult not cooking healthy. IMHO.

                  As an adult we choose what comes in the house. Kids eat what's at the table. I know they eat other stuff out of the house, but at least they are making good choices here.

                  Since I have the eating down, they next thing my hubby and I are starting to work on is more of the sensory diet. That is the real hard stuff. I do find that the equivalent of lifting heavy things truly helps. That plumb tired out feeling is a real release. For example, I just finished shoveling snow/ and feel terrific where I came home from the store twitchy form all the people and now I feel relaxed.




                  Oh and to the people fighting on this thread - go play somewhere else please.
                  You know all those things you wanted to do: You should go do them.

                  Age 48
                  height 5'3
                  SW 215 lbs
                  CW 180 lbs (whole foods/primal eating)
                  LW 172 lbs
                  GW 125ish lbs

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Just gather info you can give. "Here read this". We are a scouting family. So we are out side a lot. This takes pre-planning for food meals. It's not easy to just run to grocery store. We try to think portable and easy. Kale chips. Homemade jerky, Hard boiled eggs, just changing the mindset about what makes a good snack. Biggest thing is to make it easy and predicable.

                    Spent morning researching cortisol and howit impacts high SPD issues. Ugh. Think I have to give up my coffee.

                    I found this and liked it
                    http://www.autism-society.org/news/diet.pdf
                    Julia
                    Starting Weight 235 - Dec 1, 2010
                    Started Primal Mid January 2011
                    Current Weight 183
                    Goal 160



                    Get Outside Already!

                    http://moderndayfitandfood.wordpress.com/
                    http://moderndaydesigns.wordpress.com/

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Ritalin is basically a caffeine pill and yet they give it to people with autism and ADHD to control symptoms. If cortisol is an issue for people with autism, then maybe it isn't advisable to give them Ritalin to begin with?

                      Wouldn't be the first time that the medical community has foisted drugs on people that not only AREN'T necessary but might even be a bad idea. Heh.
                      "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Drumroll View Post
                        Ritalin is basically a caffeine pill and yet they give it to people with autism and ADHD to control symptoms. If cortisol is an issue for people with autism, then maybe it isn't advisable to give them Ritalin to begin with?

                        Wouldn't be the first time that the medical community has foisted drugs on people that not only AREN'T necessary but might even be a bad idea. Heh.
                        Ritalin isn't advisable for anyone... they use it for narcoleptics too when a lot of the times people that get diagnosed with narcolepsy usually should be diagnosed with obesity as it's their heart not being able to keep up due to strain. Doctors aren't advisable for anyone (well most of the time).
                        -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Him View Post
                          • Lack of managing appropriate social conduct
                          • Anger management problems
                          • Controlling feelings such as depression, fear or anxiety
                          • Lack of empathy
                          • Inability to listen to others
                          • Inflexible thinking
                          • Repetitive routines provides feelings of security
                          • Stress when their routine suddenly changes
                          • Inability to think in abstract ways
                          • Specialised fields of interest
                          • Visual thinking
                          --http://www.asperger-advice.com/asperger-symptoms-in-adults.html
                          I think a lot of that applies to me. However, since we learn a lot from mimicking others, I think I've taught myself the appropriate responses so that people who meet me don't know.

                          For eg., if someone asks me about how I eat, and then says they could never give up bread, my brain thinks, "then stay fat and die young you f***ing a**hole," but my face smiles, and I say out loud, "yeah, it's not for everyone." In fact, I over compensate by being painfully polite in public. But it's learned behavior, and even after over a half century on the planet, it's not always habit - I have to remind myself that others have feelings and don't like to be called stupid even when they clearly are.

                          About half the items on that list describe me, but I'd rather just think of myself as an eccentric recluse who self-medicates with copious amounts of alcohol.
                          "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                          B*tch-lite

                          Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            I don't have Asperger's. I'm just introverted and misanthropic.
                            Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              I'm another who has never been diagnosed, but am pretty sure that I'm at least mildly Aspie... my 14 year old son has also not been diagnosed, but even Aspie people recognise him as one of their own! He's definitely more so than me... but at the same time, I have a lot of Aspie traits. I'm socially useless and am often puzzled by stuff that seems obvious to others (like I ate fish at work one day... apparently EVERYONE knows you can't eat fish at work... I still haven't figured out why it's such a bad thing :P)

                              All that said I function pretty well, and my son should be able to function okay as long as he's in a job where he's mostly left to his own devices and he doesn't have to be nice to people!! (He's highly intelligent, but cares little for other people except his family and a few close friends who he connects with, he doesn't give a hoot what he looks like or what he wears, and isn't afraid to speak his mind even when he's been told it's inappropriate to do so, and so on and so forth).

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Maybe the Aspie way of speaking one's mind and ignoring the stupid and mediocre in life is a mini evolution of spirit against the herd mentality that has pervaded everyday life since at least the 1980s and maybe longer.
                                "Right is right, even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it." - St. Augustine

                                B*tch-lite

                                Who says back fat is a bad thing? Maybe on a hairy guy at the beach, but not on a crab.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X