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  • Iron cooking utensils

    Right, from the pan into fire so to speak: last year my sweet Gf gave me a iron pan to cook so we would use our non stick pan less. After reading the instructions carefully and treating it according with oil, washing it with only water I ended up with this...


    What did I do wrong and how can I rectify it? Can it have anything to do with the fact that our apartment can get rather damp unless we use the dehumidifier 24/7?

    Cheers!

  • #2
    You need to scrape the rust off and oil it again.

    And oil it every time after you wash it.
    Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

    Griff's cholesterol primer
    5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
    Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
    TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
    bloodorchid is always right

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Skydiver View Post
      Right, from the pan into fire so to speak: last year my sweet Gf gave me a iron pan to cook so we would use our non stick pan less. After reading the instructions carefully and treating it according with oil, washing it with only water I ended up with this...


      What did I do wrong and how can I rectify it? Can it have anything to do with the fact that our apartment can get rather damp unless we use the dehumidifier 24/7?

      Cheers!
      Lodge - Seasoned Cast Iron

      Everything you want or need to know about treatment of cast iron...
      Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
      Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
      Current weight: 210.8 lbs
      Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

      The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
      ChooseMyPlate

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      • #4
        When you wash it, wipe any visible water off then put it on the stove and heat it up for a minute or two to make sure you get it ALL. one drop of water will pop rust up on one in a couple of days.

        Go take some time and read How To: Cast Iron Skillet Non-Stick and Lasts a Lifetime all you need to know about cast iron!
        -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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        • #5
          A well-seasoned iron pan will treat you better than any non-stick cooking pan will... and without the cancer risk. In fact, you'll get quite some benefit from it. You just need to treat it right. I only cook with iron now, and I love it.

          Cast Iron Pans, Iron and Carcinogens in Cast Iron, Techniques for Restoring an old Cast-Iron Skillet

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          • #6
            The only downsides I can see are the fact that it's so heavy, plus you need oven mitts to carry it over to the table to serve.
            Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

            Griff's cholesterol primer
            5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
            Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
            TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
            bloodorchid is always right

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by magicmerl View Post
              The only downsides I can see are the fact that it's so heavy, plus you need oven mitts to carry it over to the table to serve.
              Yeah as a bachelor I can tell you that naked cooking with an iron pan can be more hazardous, and I've almost burned my dick several times now. But... I probably shouldn't have been cooking naked to begin with.

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              • #8
                This is an excellent post on seasoning cast iron. Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To You want a drying oil. I've used this method, using boiled linseed oil on non cooking pieces of iron, and it does amazingly well.
                Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by magicmerl View Post
                  The only downsides I can see are the fact that it's so heavy, plus you need oven mitts to carry it over to the table to serve.

                  Heavy?! Man, I hold that thing for 5-10 minutes sometimes getting egg off of it when I don't get the sides coated in butter good. It's free strength training, especially if it's heavy to you.
                  -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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                  • #10
                    Pans like that are a PITA. Not the fact that they are cast iron, but the grill ridges. Hard to clean because all those grooves collect stuff you want to scrub and all those edges get the seasoning rubbed off when you scrub.

                    My advice:
                    Scrub it down, removing visible rust
                    Re-season
                    Don't wash with water! If you can't wipe everything off with a paper towel, scrub with a dry brush. If a dry brush gets gets gunked up, pour cheap table salt in the pan and scrub that with a dry brush. Asian markets sometimes have bamboo brushes that are great for cast iron by the way.
                    Oil the pan after every use, every cleaning.
                    Try to cook mostly fatty meats that will hold together for awhile.

                    After a lot of use (100+ uses) with lots of oil before, during, and after cooking, the coating will be thick enough for occasional washing with water...but you may not feel it's needed by then.

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                    • #11
                      I've noticed that to prevent food from sticking, you need to heat it up slowly. If your meat is coming straight from the fridge, you need to warm it up on a very low temperature. Taking it out before hand and letting it warm up also works.

                      Too much heat = sticking.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Bosnic View Post
                        I've noticed that to prevent food from sticking, you need to heat it up slowly. If your meat is coming straight from the fridge, you need to warm it up on a very low temperature. Taking it out before hand and letting it warm up also works.

                        Too much heat = sticking.
                        My favorite method is to put the skillet on the heat and put the meat in at the same time. That way, it gradually brings the temperature of the meat up with the pan. I drop a couple tablespoons of butter in after I pull the sausage out and fry my eggs. I NEVER have sticking. Not even once... but I did an old-fashioned seasoning, and it is MUCH more durable than even the Lodge instructions. (To clarify: long ago, NO one would use a vegetable oil for seasoning their skillet, because they simply didn't exist. They used lard or tallow, and because it is so highly saturated, it requires high temperatures to polymerize... so I use lard, and expose it to VERY high temperatures. My favorite method for that is to put it on my grill with a full complement of lump charcoal going, VERY VERY hot)
                        The coating MUST be very thin, or it gets sticky. After the initial coat sets, you can add another coating (and back onto the heat) to seal it further.
                        My Wagner Ware skillet is FAR more non-stick than any non-stick pans I've used in the past. Now, I just have to get all the poorly polymerized factory seasoning off my Dutch Oven and I should be good to go.
                        Peak weight on Standard American Diet: 316.8 lbs
                        Initial Weight When Starting Primal: 275 lbs
                        Current weight: 210.8 lbs
                        Goal weight: 220 lbs (or less): MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

                        The way "ChooseMyPlate.gov" should have looked:
                        ChooseMyPlate

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I tried the Sheryl Canter method but I didn't get amazing results. I did 4 or 5 coats, but the pan was still not black. It looked somewhat reddish maybe, but not really like rust. I took the "wipe off all the oil" part to heart. The pans were barely even slick when I put them in the oven. Am I leaving too thin of a layer? Should I be slightly less enthusiastic with wiping all the oil off?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
                            I tried the Sheryl Canter method but I didn't get amazing results. I did 4 or 5 coats, but the pan was still not black. It looked somewhat reddish maybe, but not really like rust. I took the "wipe off all the oil" part to heart. The pans were barely even slick when I put them in the oven. Am I leaving too thin of a layer? Should I be slightly less enthusiastic with wiping all the oil off?
                            Are you talking about seasoning it? I season mine by filling it with lard and poppin it in the oven for a few hours.
                            People too weak to follow their own dreams will always try to discourage others.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by yodiewan View Post
                              I tried the Sheryl Canter method but I didn't get amazing results. I did 4 or 5 coats, but the pan was still not black. It looked somewhat reddish maybe, but not really like rust. I took the "wipe off all the oil" part to heart. The pans were barely even slick when I put them in the oven. Am I leaving too thin of a layer? Should I be slightly less enthusiastic with wiping all the oil off?
                              Are you sure the oven was hot enough? When I've seasoned stuff it's worked well, although the whole house smelled bad. Also, was this a new pan or older one? If it was new did it have a preseasoned layer that needed cleaning off? Or if it was older was it cleaned and dried thoroughly first? The iron I've used this on was old, weathered pieces that I found along the RR tracks, so seriously rough shape, but even then, after a good cleaning and drying blackened up nicely.
                              Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

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