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So sick of living inside the machine. Where to go?

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  • #31
    Dude
    Do what my wife and I did, take 6 months off, load the car with camp gear and the kids and take off. We did a migration around Australia with no plan. I know you have to come back to the real world however it makes it all a bit more bearable and just having to worry about food and shelter only for six months straight is rather good for the soul.

    Regards Darky

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    • #32
      Loved that book and movie.

      Originally posted by OneDeltaTenTango View Post
      This reminds me of the indian in Ken Kesey's "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" whose mental derangement (or not) was that the "combine" had its wires in him. The book is an interesting allegory and relevant to the discussion here.
      An optimist is someone who falls off the Empire State Building, and after 50 floors says, 'So far so good!'
      -Somebody funny

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      • #33
        trying to enjoy where I live right now with my wife and son. getting chickens this coming spring, fun
        An optimist is someone who falls off the Empire State Building, and after 50 floors says, 'So far so good!'
        -Somebody funny

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        • #34
          Originally posted by RaeVynn View Post
          I'd kinda like to move to Belize or Ecuador... out of the US rat race, anyway, and a more laid-back, less consumerism lifestyle.

          Otherwise, it's finding a few acres to raise our own veggies (well, I do some of that now), and maybe have a beef to grass feed.
          Depending on where you live, you need 5-50+ acres for a single cow to do it wholly on grass, this is assuming you want to feed it hay from your own pasture in the winter.
          -Ryan Mercer my blog and Genco Peptides my small biz

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          • #35
            We lived in our RV for 9 months, but were limited to an area for work (husband was looking for telecommute jobs but none panned out). Even then, it was a wonderful experience and we'll probably do it again at some point in the future. We lived in a nearly empty state park (off-season) on a lake for months on end, it felt like having it all to ourselves. We're tired of living in the machine as well, but are making it work for now so that we will have the resources to homestead and/or full-time RV later on.

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            • #36
              The closest that I have been able to opt out from society is living and working overseas. I have spent the last 4 years in Egypt about 1.5 hours from Cairo. While not primitive it is pretty secluded. I don't have to go into Cairo often and my interaction with others is limited to when I'm at work.

              Not ideal, I don't live in a cave or have to chase down my food but I can buy truly organic veggies, grassfed meat, eggs so fresh they still have feathers and chicken shit on them. People leave me alone and I leave them alone. I can choose to partake in parts of Egyptian culture that are as modern as anything in the US or go to places, like with the Bedouins, where their way of life has not changed completely from what it was a century ago.

              There are other parts of Africa where you can disappear and try to survive. As modern as this world has gotten, there are still dark and primitive parts to be found.
              Randal
              AKA: Texas Grok

              Originally posted by texas.grok
              Facebook is to intelligence what a black hole is to light
              http://hardcoremind.com/

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              • #37
                Originally posted by fuzzylogic View Post
                Giggle. Do you know how hard it is to live without running water? How about heat and refrigeration? Sanitation? Where would your food come from? Deer are not a nutritionally complete diet: and one deer provides possible 40-50 lbs of meat IF you eat everything down to tongue, liver, heart and kidneys. Have you ever tried subsistence farming? What do you do when the squash bugs eat your vines, or the hail knocks down your corn?

                How do you sleep and keep alert for predators? Have you ever built a shelter?

                I've lived without running water, electricity, and used a woodstove for heat. I've raised and slaughtered my own animals and produced or bartered for the majority of my food. I've preserved it, cooked it, and picked bugs out of the flour when that was all I had. I've fed my kids and scraped plates when they were done and asleep to have food.

                This romantic idea of life on the land is crap. You aren't ready to work that hard.
                This typical response is really closed-minded. Just because you haven't found the hole in the wall doesn't mean others haven't found it and slipped through it already. I posted 6 links in this thread with examples of people who have done it and ideas for ways out of the machine. And there are many more ways to do it other than the small examples I provided. It does not necessarily require "living off the land."
                Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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                • #38
                  I think it is true that subsistence living can be very challenging, and it can also be a joy. It really depends upon the person, I suppose.

                  It's not hte life for me, which is why I spoke to other options. It would take me a fair amount of time to learn to grow my food, forage, hunt, and fish -- and I'd rather watch movies. That's just the bold fact of it. I'm not interested in those activities. And when the zombie apocalypse comes, I'll be screwed, but carpe diem.

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                  • #39
                    Read the book "My Side of the Mountain".
                    "All of God's creatures have a natural habitat... my dinner plate." -Me

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                    • #40
                      Not closed-minded. I just think it is really really funny when someone tells me they want to live off the land because they're tired of working so hard.

                      I've hauled a days worth of water from a pond for cattle, hauled more to water my garden, stayed up til midnight and the next morning canning food that was going to spoil and done it by woodstove in 99 degree heat. I've cried as I put down dog-savaged sheep and pulled baby goats and lambs myself because I couldn't afford a vet.

                      Cutesy ideas of living in an RV as authentic back to the land are just that: cutesy.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by fuzzylogic View Post
                        Not closed-minded. I just think it is really really funny when someone tells me they want to live off the land because they're tired of working so hard.

                        I've hauled a days worth of water from a pond for cattle, hauled more to water my garden, stayed up til midnight and the next morning canning food that was going to spoil and done it by woodstove in 99 degree heat. I've cried as I put down dog-savaged sheep and pulled baby goats and lambs myself because I couldn't afford a vet.

                        Cutesy ideas of living in an RV as authentic back to the land are just that: cutesy.
                        I don't think it's not wanting to do work... It's not wanting to work for someone else's benefit, and be given a rather un proportionate amount of money just to end up giving it to someone else who profits from your basic needs. It's not wanting to be called a bum or a hippie for having the before mentioned opinion. It's not wanting to be pigeonholed into a normal, functioning, boring, member of society, only to be told you're not being yourself.

                        It's wanting to work for you, to benefit you, and most importantly, to be happy. It's working hard, but having something real to show for it i.e. health, happiness, a family, a home, and ultimately, independence. It's about connecting with the earth, not being isolated from it.
                        Last edited by joelwlcx; 12-08-2012, 07:00 PM.
                        "All of God's creatures have a natural habitat... my dinner plate." -Me

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                        • #42
                          I would agree.

                          Working for yourself often means working harder, but you get to reap 100% of the benefits of your hard work -- whether that's working on a farm at subsistence levels (such as this crew who love their life) or working for yourself in any other entrepreneur-adventure.

                          When DH and I were in the US, working for others, we would work an average of 35-40 hr work weeks, being paid what our jobs were paid, as determined by those who employed us. We would receive benefits as they determined, too. And holidays. And sick days. And everything else.

                          Being frugal, we lived very well on our relatively low incomes and didn't want for anything. . . except freedom. The opportunity to succeed and fail on our own merits. The opportunity to reap all of the rewards for our hard work.

                          We moved to NZ. We bought a business. It's my dream business. I love it. I work an average of 60 hour work weeks. Dh works about 40 in the business and manages our household. We currently make less than we did before, but we have the opportunity to earn a lot more as we build our business. It's only been two years, and we have secured for ourselves a great income so far, with so much room to grow (the four arms of our business currently are only at 1/3 capacity, and as I discover and train more resources, we'll be able to sustainably grow -- meaning that we can triple our current income, which will be double what we were making after 15 years in industry in the US! And, we plan on franchising, which means basically unlimited potential.)

                          So, yes, I do work harder. But I am out of the rat race. I'm doing really rewarding work that I *love* and reaping ALL of the benefit of that work. And, I'm able to help others do the same with my business, as well as provide for some folks who simply don't want to run their own businesses (maybe only want to teach yoga part time, etc).

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                          • #43
                            I don't think anyone believes it would be all picking berries and laying on the grass in the sun. If they do, they're idiots and they'll figure it out pretty quickly. My idea of that lifestyle involves a lot of poop, blood, sweat, misc odd animal fluids and doing things that aren't pleasant because they're merciful. Just my take, and I may still be wrong.

                            What people are fighting against in "the cage" is having no control over their own lives. It could go bad, it could go well, but little you do has any effect on it. For instance, I've worked hard and smart and ethically for my last two companies. I got laid off from the last one because the real estate market tanked and they couldn't afford to keep me (or more than half of their other employees), and I hated it, but I understood. With my current job, I've been on a layoff notice for more than a year now, just waiting for the axe (maybe in a month?) because they took more than $100 million from the government to eliminate my job with new technology.

                            Even though I could go out and get another corporate job with nice insurance, paid sick days and paid vacation, I really need to understand that the security I thought I could find in a massive corporation just isn't there, and the only real security I have is relying on myself.
                            Durp.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                              If we left, where could we go? What forests can we live in without fear of being hunted or harassed? Where are the deer plentiful?

                              I'm 30. This has all been crap. I want to wake up, find food, love my family, play games, work the land a little, and sleep free of B.S. I want every day to be the same.


                              I just don't know how much longer I can take this fake, fake world and these games we play, the money we have to make, the dreams we must kill to satisfy cultural norms. Why don't we take to the trees again?
                              Husband and I feel the same way. We left our home, bought an RV, bought 16 acres of land and are living on it now all within ONE year of deciding to do this. Working on the eco-home/solar/water catching thing and next year getting some farm animals and big garden etc.... Aaaaahhhhh love it.
                              Earthy Mama's Journal

                              "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food" ~ Hippocrates

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                              • #45
                                Brazil, Ecuador, Northern Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Rural Colorado, Rural Montana, Rural Alaska, and other places you can get out of the rats race. For me I like Northern Colorado for its affordable housing, ample jobs and plenty of open space between NOCO and Wyoming. Great hunting also .... duck, goose (state infestation from canada), elk, deer, antelope and rabbits in the cold months (bow hunting my preferred method). Then you are close enough to Denver for a play or ballet if you feel the need to indulge.

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