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  • Sensitive teeth?

    I will probably have to get some major dental work. But I was curious if I could improve my extremely sensitive teeth somehow. I can hardly eat or drink anything cold without deep, severe pain. We're talking a glass of cold water or even a salad is just too much. The pain is in all the molars where I had crowns put on last year. I'm so unhappy I had this dental work done. It ruined my life. I almost don't even chew my food anymore. Anyway, I know I need to get a dentist to help me, but in the mean time, has anyone done anything primal-wise to improve the sensitivity of their teeth?
    Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

  • #2
    Sounds like your roots may be going and you may need root canals or extractions.

    Bone broth and gelatin.
    You could try oil pulling and brushing with baking soda or a natural toothpaste. Try to avoid cold foods and acidic foods - citrus, many other fruits, tomatos etc

    Hope it is just a temporary thing.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
      I will probably have to get some major dental work. But I was curious if I could improve my extremely sensitive teeth somehow. I can hardly eat or drink anything cold without deep, severe pain. We're talking a glass of cold water or even a salad is just too much. The pain is in all the molars where I had crowns put on last year. I'm so unhappy I had this dental work done. It ruined my life. I almost don't even chew my food anymore. Anyway, I know I need to get a dentist to help me, but in the mean time, has anyone done anything primal-wise to improve the sensitivity of their teeth?
      Couple suggestions:
      1. Make sure you are using a soft toothbrush;
      2. Use Sensodyme -- it's a good product and it works;
      3. Are you grinding your teeth at night? You may need a night guard and only a dentist will be able to tell
      4. Research a product called MI Paste. This is to be used on your teeth after you brush and floss at night. You apply a small amount of MI Paste and it remineralizes the teeth and reduces sensitivity.

      I have very very sensitive teeth due to brushing too hard and grinding my teeth at night. I cannot eat any cold fruit or drink anything that has ice cubes in it. Ice cream has me on the ceiling -- so all cold things are a 'no go'.

      Best to check with your dentist --- make sure the Crowns are okay and no other issue.

      Best of luck.
      /Lu
      ----------------------------------------
      F, 48, 5'10"
      Start Date: 25-06-12 @ 161lbs
      Goal Reached: 30-09-12 @ 143lb. Now bouncing between 145lb - 149lb. I'd like less bounce and more consistency :-)

      Started Cross Fit 20.12.12 ---- Can't wait to submit my success story on the 1st anniversary of starting primal.

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      • #4
        Have You Got A Weston A. Price Smile? | Food Renegade

        How to Remineralize Teeth Naturally- Diet and Herbs to Support Teeth | Wellness Mama

        maybe these will help?
        beautiful
        yeah you are

        Baby if you time travel back far enough you can avoid that work because the dust won't be there. You're too pretty to be working that hard.
        lol

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        • #5
          I have a very similar condition like yours and what ive found is very useful is to mix it up.
          One week go with the herbs, the next week with sensodyne, the next with colgate, the next with oralB, and so on.
          Its like the IF-carb refeed thing, gotta keep those thresholds on their toes!!!

          "If you can dream, then dream out loud" - Bono.

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          • #6
            Mixture of Cod Liver oil and butter oil, as recommended by Weston A. Price's research (a dentist himself)....can actually help re-mineralize teeth and create a 2ndary dentin. Bone broth is also great to add in the mix as mentioned above.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
              I will probably have to get some major dental work. But I was curious if I could improve my extremely sensitive teeth somehow. I can hardly eat or drink anything cold without deep, severe pain. We're talking a glass of cold water or even a salad is just too much. The pain is in all the molars where I had crowns put on last year. I'm so unhappy I had this dental work done. It ruined my life. I almost don't even chew my food anymore. Anyway, I know I need to get a dentist to help me, but in the mean time, has anyone done anything primal-wise to improve the sensitivity of their teeth?
              I had a bunch of crowns done at once due to chemo wrecking my enamel. It took my teeth a year or so to "settle down" and stop being sensitive but they did. All by themselves. The nerves have just been jangled on a deep level in the grinding down process. Just give it time.

              All the advice about re-mineralization is good but it doesn't really apply to crowns.

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              • #8
                I've noticed that if I use regular toothpaste, they're sensitive. Even Sensodyne. I'm currently using Earthpaste and loving it. No pain, nothing. My teeth feel cleaner, too.
                Most people don't realize how much energy it takes for me to pretend to be normal.

                If I wanted to listen to an asshole, I'd fart.

                Twibble's Twibbly Wibbly

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                • #9
                  I keep hoping they will settle down. I'm really very unhappy. I cannot close my mouth all the way anymore. One of them sticks out too much and I don't like the way it grinds/sticks/catches on the one below it. I went to the best dentist in town, too. I had multiple referrals from friends and the dentist had won the local best of award multiple years.

                  I noticed my natural toothpaste says that it's whitening and tartar control but no fluoride. I can't see how that would affect crowns, but perhaps it does.
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sounds like you have something a bit too exposed there.

                    My teeth are naturally sensitive, so I brush once a day, max (the natural film that people often call "plaque" numbs sensitivity and I haven't yet got a cavity!), I instinctively lick my teeth after eating sweet things and scratch excess plaque away with my nails or a toothpick. Mouth-wash is the best option forthe vast majority of the time. And don't brush after a meal or a sweet, as the enamel is softened: mouth-wash instead.
                    Unsure if it'd help you, as yours came on after dental work. :/
                    --
                    Perfection is entirely individual. Any philosophy or pursuit that encourages individuality has merit in that it frees people. Any that encourages shackles only has merit in that it shows you how wrong and desperate the human mind can get in its pursuit of truth.

                    --
                    I get blunter and more narcissistic by the day.
                    I'd apologize, but...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                      I keep hoping they will settle down. I'm really very unhappy. I cannot close my mouth all the way anymore. One of them sticks out too much and I don't like the way it grinds/sticks/catches on the one below it. I went to the best dentist in town, too. I had multiple referrals from friends and the dentist had won the local best of award multiple years.

                      I noticed my natural toothpaste says that it's whitening and tartar control but no fluoride. I can't see how that would affect crowns, but perhaps it does.
                      You need to get that fixed. Soon. Perhaps that dentist wasn't the best one in town after all. If the bite is not coming together right, it is going to keep on jangling those nerves and not let the teeth settle down.

                      And you're right, your toothpaste is pretty irrelevant to crowns.

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                      • #12
                        I agree with Paleobird. You need to get the crowns level so one isn't receiving the brunt of the pressure when chewing. Even though you do have crowns you might want to ditch the whitening toothpaste since it's known to make teeth sensitive.

                        Has the pain/sensitivity come on all of a sudden or been there all along since the crowns? It's it's sudden onset you'll want to go in to the dentist and have them look. I had sudden pain months after a crown and it turns out of the root was dying so they needed to do a root canal.

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                        • #13
                          any dentist can grind down that one crown that sticks up. That happens sometimes with crowns. No big deal but it could be the cause of your problems. PS they should do it for free if they did the crown. I have very sensitive teeth too due to grinding at night. I now wear a mouth guard religiously every night. Takes a while to get used to but I do not want to break any more teeth!! I use Pro-namel because I think it tastes better than Sensodyne.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
                            I will probably have to get some major dental work. But I was curious if I could improve my extremely sensitive teeth somehow.
                            Mine used to hurt a few years ago. At the time I was eating a fairly standard diet and drinking more beer than was good for me.

                            They give me nary a twinge now.

                            Ramiel Nagel has it that the major problem with teeth is demineralisation.

                            Cure Tooth Decay: Remineralize Cavities and Repair Your Teeth Naturally with Good Food [Second Edition]: Ramiel Nagel, D.D.S. Timothy Gallagher: 9780982021323: Amazon.com: Books

                            He also, unusually, lays out an old theory of tooth decay that has it that the chief culprit there is actually demineralisation caused by ... blood-sugar spikes. He may well be right. The beer swilling could certainly do that.

                            He goes back to some of the Weston Price stuff, but takes an interesting and subtle view of it. Price thought that the major safeguard for teeth and bones was an abundant supply of minerals and of fat-soluble vitamins. Price, nevertheless, had a kind of "don't interfere with nature" view of food that led him to say than wholefoods, including wholegrains, were aways best. Nagel thinks that Price probably wasn't paying enough attention to how food was prepared, and that many traditional societies who did eat grain took out at least some of the bran, which contains chelating agents that, he says, will pull minerals from the teeth. He advances some interesting arguments, and another look at Price's own figures, that suggest that thought should be taken seriously. Nagel also tells, intriguing, that some keen WAPF parents who've given their children plenty of wholegrains have seen cavities as a result.

                            The takeaway? If you do occasionally eat grains, foods made from partially polished (but not perhaps totally "white" and certainly not bleached) grains may be best. But little or nothing in the way of that is probably safest.

                            The positive thing to emerge out of Price's work is probably the minerals/fat-soluble vitamins thing.

                            I'd buy Nagel's book and give his suggestions a whirl. I think making sure one has a mineral rich diet (and supplementing as necessary), eating organ meats a couple of times a week, taking some fish liver oil, and eating in such as way as to avoid spiking blood-sugar are all probably good strategies that are worth a try. Nagel suggests the naturally fermented cod liver oil from Green Pastures. I've used that, and I don't think it did me anything but good. He also thinks a small amount of the same company's skate liver oil can be beneficial.

                            I'd go easy on the teeth-cleaning and use a soft brush as has already been said. It may even be better to back off a bit and only brush once a day.

                            As for toothpaste -- Dr. Lo Radio had a good episode on Holistic Dentistry with a very knowledgable-sounding and caring dentist. The dentist doing that says he recommends only one toothpaste. I can't remember the name, and I don't think it's available in this country, but if you're in the U.S. that might be worth a look:

                            Holistic Dentistry with Dr Stephen Lawrence 01/17 by DrLoRadio | Blog Talk Radio

                            He also recommends using a water-pick to clean. That might be another option for getting the food particles out without damaging the gums in the way that over-enthusiastic brushing can.

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                            • #15
                              The one crown that sticks out hurt a lot right away, so much so that I went back to the dentist and he gave me antibiotics (which I didn't take.) Eventually it subsided on its own, but I've never been able to chew anything substantial on that side since the dental work. The sensitivity to cold seems to have been building over time and seems pretty bad now. I don't remember it being so bad at first after the dental work. I always bleed from the gums so I try to be gentle, not that it makes any difference. I didn't even realize my toothpaste was whitening and tartar control. It's Tom's fluoride-free.

                              I hate going to the dentist. Grr. I just finally got my bank account back up to where it was before I went to the dentist for all this dental work. Cost me 4 grand. Merry Christmas to the dentist. I hope your kids go to a good college.
                              Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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