Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My Neurologist pushed veganism, and scoffed at me. =(

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Especially a neurologist!

    Seriously, you would think the biggest fans of good dietary fat (including animal) would be people that focus on brain health all day!
    Durp.

    Comment


    • #17
      PoeticPixe-
      It shocked me too. It sure is a huge readjustment to suddenly be reasonably healthy, when even brushing my teeth didn't count as an everyday essential anymore.
      The amount of food my body seems to want these days is an adjustment as well. I still tend to undereat, when my body could probably still use quite a bit more for fixing all the stuff that's still wrong. I definitely notice the difference in my energy levels.

      Comment


      • #18
        Hi PoeticPixe,

        I also am diagnosed with MS. My first symptom (optic neuritis) was about 6 years ago, but I wasn't formally diagnosed until about 2 years ago. I resisted my neurologist's attempts to force me onto one of those terribly toxic ABC drugs for MS and instead chose to go the route of diet. I initially cut out gluten, dairy, and then later legumes (including soy).

        After those dietary changes, I continued to have some symptoms, but they were relatively minor. Years later, I followed the Swank diet (but I disagreed with his allowance of crappy wheat products and low-fat dairy, so I did sort of a gluten/dairy/soy free version of Swank, which I later discovered was called 'The Best Bet Diet'. I was still eating HFCS and omega 6 crap oils at that point, though.

        I actually think it's impressive that you found one of the few neurologists who has ever even heard of the Swank diet, and suggests it, because I think that many of them are in some way on big pharma's payroll (based on how persistently they push toxic drugs with no long term studies done, and which reduce symptoms in a 1/3 of patients at best while causing a host of even more serious side-effects) and are unwilling to admit that diet could ever play any kind of role in brain/nervous system/immune health.

        While I don't agree with some of it, I can understand why your doc would recommend it; it's basically the only diet that has been shown to prevent people with MS from getting worse, and is backed by a 50+ year longevity study, which is unheard of as far as diet studies go. It's really the only diet out there with any kind of research behind it, which is why I decided to follow my version of it.

        However, you did quote some pretty heinous lines from this doctor that are just blatantly false (as I'm sure you know already). He is clearly misinformed, and also someone who is not interested in learning, so it's probably not worth your time to try to correct his mistakes in basic human evolution and digestion.

        Don't forget something very important; he works for you. You are paying him. If you're not satisfied with his care, you can choose someone else. Or, you can choose to see him only to periodically keep tabs on your lesion situation, and let his nonsense go in one ear and out the other. You have the power in this relationship, and you can choose to listen to his garbage or not. Don't let his power trip become your problem.

        Anyway, time to get off my anti-doctor soapbox. When I learned about paleo, that's when the HFCS and crap oils got taken out of the diet. after about 6-8 months of paleo, I slowly started increasing my saturated fat (which I had been REALLY scared about doing, since the Swank Diet is all about low sat fat). I continue to have no relapses or new lesions.

        My philosophy on autoimmune disorders, like MS, is that they are the body's attempt to tell us that we need to make some changes, because something we are doing is hurting us. The tricky part is to figure out what needs to change. For me, it was both diet and stress, which coincidentally happen to be two of the main triggers for autoimmune flares. For me, the stress part of the equation involved ending an unhappy, long-term relationship and moving to a more affordable, laid-back city. As important as I know diet is, I actually think that making those serious life changes were even more important, because I was living in a way that was slowly suffocating me, and I think my body was trying to get me to wake up and realize it.

        Had I listened to my gastroenterologists, I would have never cured my IBS (which I had for years, and was told was incurable). And had I blindly followed my neurologists, I would be taking toxic immune-suppressing drugs, and probably be intermittently paralyzed.

        I read a great analogy of autoimmune disorders somewhere years ago that basically said that autoimmune disorders are like smoke detectors in a house that is on fire. They alert you to the fact that there is something majorly wrong. Your goal should be to put out the fire, not pull the batteries out of the smoke detector because it won't stop beeping. But the medical community doesn't realize this, and they are so focused on pulling out the batteries (i.e. prescribing toxic drugs that suppress the immune system) that they never spend any time thinking about how to put out the fire (i.e. correct the underlying problem that is causing the immune system to attack itself.)

        We all have the power to heal ourselves, and it's becoming increasingly more important that we accept this responsibility rather than blindly follow doctors who have demonstrated that they can't cure us.
        Last edited by BestBetter; 11-10-2012, 02:47 PM.

        Comment


        • #19
          Sorry you've had such a bad experience, sounds like the neurologist was a pushy vegan himself!!

          I see a neuro for migraines and despite my experiences, he insists diet isn't a factor. Incredible, right? So i am quietly improving my health my way It's a shame he couldn't take on board what i had to say though, particularly when an unprocessed diet could really help some of his patients.

          Comment


          • #20
            If you go there again and the topic come up, make sure to bring an extra book on the subject with you. You can go all 'Hey, I just happen to be reading this book I have in my handbag, but I think you need it more. You are responsible for my care and I want you to be educated about my dietary choices before pushing anything on me, or I won't trust you as my doctor because it kind of makes you look line an uneducated ass'. Should work.

            Comment


            • #21
              Sighhhhhhhhhhhhhhh. According to CW we should all be dead. Animals eat other animals. It's so freaking obvious that it blows my mind how people cant see this.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by JoanieL View Post
                Get a new neurologist pronto. I'm sorry, but anyone who thinks we "evolved" to eat plant matter only is a bit of a goofball.
                To be fair, it *was* true for us up until about 4 million years ago. But yeah, large brain = meat eating is pretty much accepted by paleo-anthropologists.
                Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                Griff's cholesterol primer
                5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                bloodorchid is always right

                Comment


                • #23
                  Thanks a ton for the support and suggestions, everyone. I truly appreciate it. You would think that my apparent health and well-being would be proof enough for my neurologist. I am currently researching a new neurologist. @ BestBetter's ...I know The Swank Diet works for some, I plan to "up" my plant matter, but I don't think I'll change much else. Mostly because I've seen such success, doing it my way. The key seems to be doing what works for you. @ geostump, thanks for the link. =)
                  No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path.
                  -Buddha

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by BestBetter View Post
                    My philosophy on autoimmune disorders, like MS, is that they are the body's attempt to tell us that we need to make some changes, because something we are doing is hurting us. The tricky part is to figure out what needs to change.

                    We all have the power to heal ourselves, and it's becoming increasingly more important that we accept this responsibility rather than blindly follow doctors who have demonstrated that they can't cure us.
                    I totally agree with all of this! It's just a matter of finding the culprit(s), and fixing it.
                    No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path.
                    -Buddha

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      You probably have already seen this site, but just in case you haven't, it's worth checking out. It's a blog by a woman with MS who is using a higher fat paleo diet to treat her MS, and has successfully put it in remission. I found it to be very reassuring when I was deciding to make the switch from lower sat fat to higher.

                      nutrisclerosis.com > Home

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by PoeticPixe View Post
                        I plan to "up" my plant matter, but I don't think I'll change much else. Mostly because I've seen such success, doing it my way. The key seems to be doing what works for you.
                        Just a side note...I know that Terry Wahls really pushes the 9 plates of veggies and fruits (that's an exaggeration, but I remember it being a lot), and when I first saw her TED talk video about a year ago, I was really into eating a tons of veggies, and was also not eating any grains or starches or sugars (except for fruit).

                        However, I discovered that eating that way was NOT what my body needed to thrive. In fact, it actually caused me a bunch of health problems...the increased levels of insoluble fiber from all those veggies contributed greatly to my IBS flaring out of control, and the low carb thing sent my hypothyroid symptoms (including fatigue) through the roof.

                        When I cut out most of those veggies and significantly increased my good carbs, I saw significant improvements. I'm now eating more in line with The Perfect Health Diet (something worth checking out, if you haven't already; they have a lot of great articles on their site), with some Ray Peat tweaks (I don't agree with all his guidelines, but he has written some fascinating out of the box stuff; a ton of interesting articles on his website.)

                        Not saying this to detract from the Terry Wahls recommendations, but if at some point you notice that you're having health issues, don't be afraid to re-examine some dietary things.

                        Some links, in case you're interested:

                        Hypothyroidism | Perfect Health Diet

                        Multiple sclerosis, protein, fats, and progesterone

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X