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  • Reverse Osmosis - Best Home Option?

    Turns out fluoride ain't good for ya! So, I'm looking to clean up the water at the house. I'm open to any and all advice on this as I have no experience here. But, my primary questions are:

    1) Is this the best individual sink option? Or would you recommend something else?
    Amazon.com: 5-Stage Premium Reverse Osmosis System: Home Improvement

    2) If I purchase an individual pipe filter (such as the linked product), I'm favoring purchasing two (kitchen sink + main shower). I'm wondering if I should go ahead and purchase a "whole home" system for the money. Any advice on whole home vs. individual pipe systems? And, any recommendation on a "whole home" product worth purchasing?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by gilroy; 10-26-2012, 05:31 PM.

  • #2
    Gilroy, we have one very similar to 1), in the kitchen. I use the R/O water for anything we drink or for what I cook with. I'm not sure a system like this would work in a shower. The tank holds the already filtered water, and once you "empty" it, it takes awhile to refill (the filtering process is not fast).

    If you're worried about fluoride and other contaminants in all your house water, you'd be better off getting a whole-house system. Sorry, but I can't recommend any particular kind. Our little village (117 houses) has its own well with no added fluoride. My husband is on the village water board, and we have some of the best water in our state!

    I'd suggest you contact a few of the larger plumbing companies in your area and see what they recommend.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Goldie View Post
      Gilroy, we have one very similar to 1), in the kitchen. I use the R/O water for anything we drink or for what I cook with. I'm not sure a system like this would work in a shower. The tank holds the already filtered water, and once you "empty" it, it takes awhile to refill (the filtering process is not fast).

      If you're worried about fluoride and other contaminants in all your house water, you'd be better off getting a whole-house system. Sorry, but I can't recommend any particular kind. Our little village (117 houses) has its own well with no added fluoride. My husband is on the village water board, and we have some of the best water in our state!

      I'd suggest you contact a few of the larger plumbing companies in your area and see what they recommend.


      Thanks Goldie.
      I think I'm going to check into what the fluoride level and overall water quality is here. It's city water but I've been told it's better than most (Chapel Hill being a pretty environmentally conscious town). So we'll see...if it's not that bad I'll just do the main kitchen sink. You're right, it would be hard to put a system like that in a shower space, didn't think about that.

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      • #4
        We have well water, living rurally, and we still put in an RO system under the kitchen sink. We started that when we used to live in NJ, when our city water made our beloved herbal teas look like mud, and taste about the same. With RO water, they stay crystal clear...

        Since we have well water though, and tested properly with a real lab and all before we bought the current house, we know that our water is just hard, so we softened it for shower use and also put in a primary filter in the line that goes to the water softener (lots of particulate stuff in the water around here). There are shower head filters out there, although I have never used one - might be an option for you.

        Just in case you didn't know - the efficiencies on household RO filters are low, meaning that you only get around 15% (or maybe a bit more with newer household RO technology) of the water entering an RO system as actual filtered water in your tank - the rest is discharged into the waste water pipes and lost. That will up your water use/bill. (Industrial/municipal systems get much, much better efficiencies because they can recycle the wastewater/know how to keep the variables of RO under control much better so that much water isn't lost (like water flux rate, solute concentration, and pressure)). BTW, the lost water is water that flushes the contaminants away.

        We like ours - lots of water tastes funny to us now. I think you'll like yours when you get it in.
        I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

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        • #5
          Just make sure to cut your RO with something hard, like a mineral supplement. Drinking straight RO will mess up your system quick, pulling minerals out of your bones and teeth to balance your body's hardness. It's very stressful. I recommend investing in a large quantity of water jugs, or a few large ones, and using well water for most drinking and cooking. Find a local artesian well to fill up at, they're usually free and closer than you think.
          Crohn's, doing SCD

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
            Just make sure to cut your RO with something hard, like a mineral supplement. Drinking straight RO will mess up your system quick, pulling minerals out of your bones and teeth to balance your body's hardness. It's very stressful. I recommend investing in a large quantity of water jugs, or a few large ones, and using well water for most drinking and cooking. Find a local artesian well to fill up at, they're usually free and closer than you think.
            try FindaSpring.com – Online Spring Database to find a natural spring.

            Knifegill - if you are back here, would you please expound on the "pulling minerals out of your bones" thing? I have read a lot about hard water gunking up your system, and then alternately purified and/or distilled water turning your bones to lace, and everything in-between, that I would like to hear more of your experience since you mentioned it.
            I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
              Knifegill - if you are back here, would you please expound on the "pulling minerals out of your bones" thing? I have read a lot about hard water gunking up your system, and then alternately purified and/or distilled water turning your bones to lace, and everything in-between, that I would like to hear more of your experience since you mentioned it.
              Yes, please, so would I.

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              • #8
                I don't have any concrete evidence. I'm just a regular joe! But as a fishkeeper, I do know a fish's health can be adversely affected when maintained in too low a pH, weakening the bones. In the short term, it's not a huge deal. It takes a long time for the damage to be done. But if you want your typical asian mass-bred pet shop fish to live a good long life, neutral or slightly hard pH is typically preferable.

                As for humans, we get our minerals from food and dirt, animal bones and, usually, water. While we might break even on the acidity scale by drinking bone broth and supplementing minerals to counteract the intense acidity/demineralizing effect of RO water, why play that game? Any water that dissolves rocks so aggressively probably should not go into the body. If anything, you'd want a net excess of minerals to be excreted, instead of a net loss of minerals spent from the bones to stabilize the bloodstream. To me, this just seems like common sense.

                A quick google search brings up a little food for thought, though I'm not really going to dig too deep.

                SnyderHealth.com - Water Ionizers - The Dangers Of Distilled And RO Water
                Crohn's, doing SCD

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                • #9
                  That site is a front to sell water ionizers. Automatic fail for any kind of belief factor.

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, you're right. But keep digging. You'll find more.
                    Crohn's, doing SCD

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Crabbcakes View Post
                      There are shower head filters out there, although I have never used one - might be an option for you.

                      Just in case you didn't know - the efficiencies on household RO filters are low, meaning that you only get around 15% (or maybe a bit more with newer household RO technology) of the water entering an RO system as actual filtered water in your tank



                      Thank you Crabbcakes. Didn't know either of those things. Whoa that's a lotta lost water! Def will look into that aspect of things too now.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Knifegill View Post
                        I don't have any concrete evidence. I'm just a regular joe! But as a fishkeeper, I do know a fish's health can be adversely affected when maintained in too low a pH, weakening the bones. In the short term, it's not a huge deal. It takes a long time for the damage to be done. But if you want your typical asian mass-bred pet shop fish to live a good long life, neutral or slightly hard pH is typically preferable.

                        As for humans, we get our minerals from food and dirt, animal bones and, usually, water. While we might break even on the acidity scale by drinking bone broth and supplementing minerals to counteract the intense acidity/demineralizing effect of RO water, why play that game? Any water that dissolves rocks so aggressively probably should not go into the body. If anything, you'd want a net excess of minerals to be excreted, instead of a net loss of minerals spent from the bones to stabilize the bloodstream. To me, this just seems like common sense.

                        A quick google search brings up a little food for thought, though I'm not really going to dig too deep.

                        SnyderHealth.com - Water Ionizers - The Dangers Of Distilled And RO Water
                        What do you do then if you don't want to drink the crap added to city water supplies? Would an RO system with an alkalysing cartridge work?
                        A steak a day keeps the doctor away

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                        • #13
                          Bushrat, I'm not sure I believe Knifegill's claims. He used as a source, a website that's trying to sell a different kind of water treatment method. I did an extensive search on the 'net, and every source I found, when I looked past the surface, was for selling some other type of water filtration system.

                          It certainly is common sense to provide an optimal water chemistry for typical asian mass-bred pet shop fish, but we're not fish. Water varies greatly in its mineral content from place to place, and did so back in Grok's day too, I'm sure--yet the human race managed to thrive in spite of that. We get the minerals we need from the variety of foods we eat. I personally would rather not risk ingesting the artificially introduced chemicals in municipal water systems.

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                          • #14
                            Agreed! We're not fish at all. And I don't have very good sources, either. But RO water is a very unnatural, extreme substance. Utah might be dry, but there has to be an artesian spring within 20 miles of your house. They're common. 15 5-gallon water jugs will last a month for drinking and cooking, and you get your minerals to boot, with no crazy, depleted, hypervalent H2O. And it's free.
                            Crohn's, doing SCD

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                            • #15
                              We're looking at getting a Big Berkey with the fluoride filter rather than a RO system. I don't think it takes as many minerals out as RO does, but I'm not sure on that. We definitely need to do something though, the levels are pretty high in our area and I'm not okay with that. The EPA recently lowered their recommendation to 0.7 and our area is at 0.94-1.3! Chapel Hill is lower at 0.57 so at least they're under the new recommendation. EPA lowers Fluoride in Water due to Health Hazards

                              http://www.owasa.org/client_resource...8%20sheets.pdf

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