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French Press coffee - good and very bad

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  • #16
    The bullet-proof coffee/executive guy says most coffee is festered with mold, so you should buy his expensive, guaranteed-mold-free stuff. He says it makes a huge difference.

    Too much coffee hurts me too. Stomach pain, general unwellness.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Sanas View Post
      The bullet-proof coffee/executive guy says most coffee is festered with mold, so you should buy his expensive, guaranteed-mold-free stuff. He says it makes a huge difference.

      Too much coffee hurts me too. Stomach pain, general unwellness.
      Yeah, his upgraded coffee is pretty awesome for a sustained brain buzz...
      ...and if you think he's just promoting it because he sells it, think again, because he has plenty of tips for finding the best coffee no matter where you are - here's the basics:

      Here’s the Bulletproof Executive way.

      Never use decaf. Ever. Caffeine protects the beans from more mold. You need it in your coffee or you shouldn’t drink it.
      Never choose robusta (cheap, instant) beans. These are moldier, which is why they are higher in caffeine too (as a defense against mold on the bush). Drink arabica.
      Insist on wet process beans. Many higher end African coffees use natural process, which means they dry the beans in the sun, giving them time to mold. Wet process coffee uses far less time and rinses the beans, making for lower-toxin coffee.
      Aim for Central American varieties grown at higher elevations where mold is scarce. (Bonus points if they’re blessed by shamans, one-armed monks, or picked by orphans…)
      Single estate is better than major brands. If it is sold by a national coffee house, its mixed with countless other sources, and you can guarantee that some toxic mold made it into the coffee.
      If you can’t find good beans, order an Americano because steam helps to break down the toxins.

      There a ton more on his site... and I personally can TOTALLY feel the difference between a cup of "clean" coffee and a cup of regular coffee.

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      • #18
        To be fair, my coffee is $2/bag more than a bag of Starbucks beans, and the guys who pick mine are Rainforest Alliance Certified, so they get paid a lot more than Fair Trade even. There is lots of (moldier) coffee more expensive than mine.

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        • #19
          I've heard that some people are actually sensitive to coffee. And no, I don't mean the caffeine in it. You can have issues with that, sure, but I'm talking about the bean itself.

          I have a friend who (like I do), drinks tea like a fiend and has no issues at all. But one cup of coffee and it's crash and burn. I think he has an allergy to something specifically in the coffee itself, and it's not the caffeine causing the issues here. Your case might be similar?
          "The cling and a clang is the metal in my head when I walk. I hear a sort of, this tinging noise - cling clang. The cling clang. So many things happen while walking. The metal in my head clangs and clings as I walk - freaks my balance out. So the natural thought is just clogged up. Totally clogged up. So we need to unplug these dams, and make the the natural flow... It sort of freaks me out. We need to unplug the dams. You cannot stop the natural flow of thought with a cling and a clang..."

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          • #20
            good old caffeine :/
            ad astra per aspera

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            • #21
              Originally posted by sbhikes View Post
              I was using the same French roast stuff I always buy from Trader Joe's. I cut way back on the coffee and feel infinitely better. At most I put about 2 level measuring teaspoons in the press now instead of an 8th of a cup. And when I get my second cup later, I make it half a cup. I think I will taper off the stuff because since I've cut back not only do I feel better but I think I have better definition. Could be a reduction in edema around the knees and ankles where it's most visible for me.
              Water retention due to coffee? That would be the first time I have heard that one. Most people experience the opposite effect. Coffee is considered a diuretic. Interesting...
              "The problem with quoting someone on the Internet is, you never know if it's legit" - Abraham Lincoln

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              • #22
                Another factor to take into account-not necessarily for you SB, but in general:

                Some of the cheap "house brand" pre-ground coffee can be , er, "extended" with roasted corn. I have a corn sensitivity and verified that rumour personally - the hard way. If you have a sensitivity to corn (or any grain, for that matter) you'll want to make sure your coffee started from whole beans.
                Misti
                ***
                Grain Free since 2009, WP from 2005
                ~100% primal (because anything less makes me very sick)
                Goal: hike across Sweden with my grandchildren when I retire in a few years

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                • #23
                  I believe it was water retention due to hormones gone haywire due to caffeine intoxication. I did not sleep well for a few days. I'm sure there were elevated stress hormones going on.
                  Female, 5'3", 50, Max squat: 202.5lbs. Max deadlift: 225 x 3.

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