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Skincare with coconut oil?

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  • Skincare with coconut oil?

    Like a few ladies around these forums, I use coconut oil as a moisturiser. The other day, I wanted to restock my coconut oil from an unfamiliar supermarket. When I couldn't find it, a staff member led me to 'copha'. I believe that brand name is uniquely Australian, but the product is just a block of 100% hydrogenated coconut oil.

    To quiet alarm bells before they ring, NO, I am not thinking of cooking with this stuff! I know the health consequences of eating hydrogenated oils. But, I don't know the consequences of moisturising with hydrogenated oil. Healthwise, and/or effectiveness-wise, do you think there would be any disadvantage in using copha rather than high-quality coconut oil?

    In terms of what I would be absorbing through my skin, I'm sure it wouldn't be worse than whichever commercial moisturiser I might otherwise grab off the supermarket shelf, or what I absorb each day from my makeup, etc. And at ~$10 a litre rather than ~$25 a litre, I'll admit I'm pretty tempted to save money on the stuff I'm smearing on my face and hair, so I can spend more on the quality stuff for eating.

    Any thoughts?

  • #2
    I've read people DO cook with it.
    I have been using it for years for my skin and even some on my hair. I don't know about the copha. I just buy virgin, organic coconut oil. Try some of the online vitamin/health stores like Lucky Vitamin or Vitacost. I get a lot of my stuff from them, and their prices are good.

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    • #3
      Here in America I use LouAna brand coconut oil on my hair and skin. I don't think it's hydrogenated, but it's made from the leftover "stuff" from making flaked coconut and filtered and everything else. And it's cheap. And it doesn't really smell like coconut. I'm in favor of spending more money on the stuff I eat.

      Hydrogenation just moves the carbon atoms around, yes? My main concern is whether this disturbs the structure of the MCFA, since, as far as I can figure, the MCFA in coconut oil is the most similar in structure to normal human oil, hence why it hydrates the skin and hair so well.

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      • #4
        I wouldn't worry too much about using it on my skin. I don't use CO on my face because it's too heavy, but everywhere else, yes.
        Buy house, Demolish house, Build house.

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        • #5
          I personally wouldn't risk it... The great effects of coconut oil are mostly due to its qualities when it's unrefined. And your skin is a giant (albeit complex) sponge; if you wouldn't put it in your body, I wouldn't necessarily put it on it, either.

          I'm a girl and I don't wear any makeup, but I use all kinds of food on my face :P

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          • #6
            I use honey to wash, coconut oil to moisturize (also cleanse), and aloe to tighten (after the coconut oil sinks in). If I feel like i need a toner, then rose water is great. So, it would go honey wash, rose water tone, coconut oil, then aloe.

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            • #7
              I used to buy a cheap (louAnn) coconut oil (for foot moisturizer, hair conditioner, iron skillet conditioner) and also an organic unrefined one (like spectrum) for supplements and using on food.
              For what I was paying at the store, I've found I can pay less on amazon for (like Nutiva) unrefined CO as well as some others and I'm comfortable using that for all my CO needs.
              K

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              • #8
                Wow. Im Australian and I've seen the copha name but didn't realise it was hydrogenated coconut oil. Eww!

                Or does the brand make other products as well?

                Tangent - this reminds me -
                I was using dripping for cooking before I settled with butter or coconut oil. This is the reason I gave up on dripping...
                I remember with my second block of dripping, melting some of it up before I threw my eggs in the pan, it smelled like I was literally cooking cat poo! I've never cooked cat poo before but this was definitely cat poo being cooked.
                I was gagging!

                Anyways, re hydrogenated CO, if I wouldn't eat it, I wouldn't put it on my skin.

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                • #9
                  Trans fats (ie in commercially hydrogenated products) are only a problem in the ****blood stream*** because they are stereoisomers of human body-hydrogenation fats ("saturation"across an unsaturated double bond) and cannot be processed like other naturally occurring fats as the body doesn't have the enzymes for them.

                  In other words... I wouldn't worry too much about trans fats in my skincare products.
                  ------
                  HCLF: lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy, bone broth/gelatin, fruits, seafood, liver, small amount of starch (oatmeal, white rice, potatoes, carrots), small amount of saturated fat (butter/ghee/coconut/dark chocolate/cheese).

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                  • #10
                    Torquise,
                    Are you saying it's okay to use the cheap, refined CO for body care externally?
                    That would be nice considering its much cheaper
                    Thx
                    K

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                    • #11
                      Skincare with coconut oil?

                      Yes I am. I would need to look more into fat transport systems across the cell-blood barriers to be sure. will report back if it isn't okay to use cheap hydrogenated oils.
                      ------
                      HCLF: lean red meat, eggs, low-fat dairy, bone broth/gelatin, fruits, seafood, liver, small amount of starch (oatmeal, white rice, potatoes, carrots), small amount of saturated fat (butter/ghee/coconut/dark chocolate/cheese).

                      My Journal: gelatin experiments, vanity pictures, law school rants, recipe links


                      Food blog: GELATIN and BONE BROTH recipes

                      " The best things in life are free and the 2nd best are expensive!" - Coco Chanel

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                      • #12
                        Thanks!

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                        • #13
                          I wouldn't have a problem using the transfat on the skin, but since I buy coconut oil in bulk and we don't go through it that quickly, I just use the same stuff that we cook with. Always getting it out of the container with a clean spoon of course.

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                          • #14
                            Hey!! I would like to advise you only one thing that instead of using any hydrogenated coconut oil instead choose some extra virgin coconut oil for moisturising your skin and you know what you can use it for cooking as well.

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                            • #15
                              Why not use tallow for a while if you can't find a good coconut brand? Personally I would not use any hydrogenated oils, internally or externally. But if you're looking for something cheap and natural, you can't go wrong with grass fed tallow as a moisturizer. I did use coconut oil for a little while, but found that tallow out-perform it by a mile.

                              Personally, I'd order a good coconut oil brand online and try tallow until it arrived in the mail.

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