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Primal children- how to transition them when they are resistant?

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  • Primal children- how to transition them when they are resistant?

    I have a daughter who has sensitivity to wheat. She is 9. She no longer gets eczema all over her body from eating wheat, so she believes she is cured. I now have a 6 month old son who at 2 weeks had internal bleeding from the wheat I was eating (and strangely I had not been eating wheat for a long time because of my daughter, and suddenly when I was pregnant it stopped giving me adverse affects, so i stared eating some, so it was strange when it hit my breast feeding son so rapidly.) because of my son's issues, I eat gluten free, dairy free, and cannot have bananas or cashews. Trying not to eat other nuts too often because of potential allergies developing. Limiting nuts makes this harder.

    My daughter wants to eat bread all the time, particularly turkey and cheese sandwiches, pasta, and rice. She has been doing Ezekial bread for years, which seems less inclined to cause external symptoms. She is clearly hypoglycemic. I want to change her diet and have her go primal as well (want my husband to do it too). She wants no part of it, and wants to eat sugar all the time though we have talked many times about how it is not good for her. I can't do it without my husband's support, and I don't know how to deal with school lunches, going over to friends' houses, etc. She has been relatively trim all her life, but is starting now to get a little chunky now. I also don't want to make her obsessed about food or weight.

    Has anyone worked on changing their children's diets and dealing with issues of them not wanting to change, and school lunches (she does not want things we can provide without bread, and my husband does not want the difficulty) and friend's houss? How much of a say should she have? What do I say to her so she understands how importnt this is for her health?

    Any advice would be appreciated.

  • #2
    SOrry that I don't have any advice, really.

    This is something for you and your husband to figure out, and just do your best and try not to worry too much, ok?

    Comment


    • #3
      Well this is a very difficult situation. Maybe you could start one meal at a time, ie dinner. Primal dinners truly are delicious, surely if you cook them, your husband and daughter will happily eat them. If you don't buy or cook pasta, they can't eat it, can they?

      Next you could consider breakfast, I buy rice bubbles for my 11yo dd, to me they are pretty much a non food but at least they are not wheat or corn so probably not too irritating for her. I buy both the sweetened yoghurt and the greek full fat and mix the two, this is creamy and sweet enough for her and my dh. (You need not let them see you doing it). But my sneakiest way of turning her primal is to leave some dinner leftovers in the fridge where she will see them and want them for breakfast, lol.

      But lunches truly are difficult. I buy the thinnest sliced white bread I can find, then provide lots of primal fillings such as leftover cooked chicken, or I toast it with butter and cheese and she takes the toasties to school. Also, she only takes one sandwich, the rest of her lunch is fruit, nuts, maybe a sliced carrot, a treat such as primal balls or ricebubble slice (or something non primal that seems to always find its way into the house such as home baking by my mum or ladies from church - I do not ask for this stuff honestly, but it happens). You could probably find nut bars that are primal ingredients such as honey and sesame seed or something.

      For her afternoon snack I provide bananas, berries and milk so she can make smoothies, I would actually even make it for her if I truly wanted her to have it or she is especially hungry or tired or whatever. So she sees that I think it's worth it. If I've made myself vege soup for lunch, I save her a cupful and just heat in the microwave, she eats it because she is hungry and I put it in front of her. But she does like it.

      I'm sure my situation is easier than yours because she does not have serious health reasons why I need her not to eat wheat, I just try to make other things to be the easier and more attractive option.
      Last edited by Annieh; 09-16-2012, 02:23 AM.
      Annie Ups the Ante
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

      Comment


      • #4
        I think you need to get a bit tougher, but without depriving your daughter of bread altogether. For example, allowing her to have a single sandwich each day is probably not too bad. For your dinners, make more primal meals. Meat and veg is not that difficult, and I think kids can adapt to it.

        Honestly, I allow my kids to have a sandwich for lunch for the simple fact that it's easier (or they have a sourdough wrap or something), but the rest of the time they don't eat wheat/bread very often. Occasionally I make pasta for them, or allow them to have noodles. I just make it more occasional than it used to be!

        It is difficult, I know. I have one child who is quite overweight, and I am really trying to work with him to get him to dump the sugar and bread. Mostly he's stopped having bread, and the last time I made pasta he didn't have much pasta at all (knowing he shouldn't have it), but I have a hard time stopping him having lollies etc. when his siblings get them (not frequently... but I do give in on occasion). He's using stevia/erythritol sweetener for drinks now, which is a good change... but we've still got a little way to go (he's 14, so he is old enough to start to understand WHY he shouldn't be having grains and sugars). The other kids, unfortunately, think it's all about weight loss, and as they're not overweight, they don't want to ditch their precious grains!! Still, I cook primal dinners 90% of the time, which benefits them as well.

        Comment


        • #5
          You're the parent. Toughen up the rules. If she's hungry, she will eat what you tell her to, if not, tough. A missed meal or 2 will not kill anyone and will instill some discipline. There was no question of talking back to my parents or telling them I didn't want to eat something when I was a child, and I grew up to be a functional adult.
          F 28/5'4/100 lbs

          "I'm not a psychopath, I'm a high-functioning sociopath; do your research."

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          • #6
            I have a 12yr old who was initially quite keen to try primal until she realised how different her diet would be to how she normally ate - she was an absolute carb fiend! I was tough and just stopped buying things that are non primal - we have a drawer that contains any of the remaining non primal foods to be used as treats (and I mean treats like they used to be when I was a kid - maybe once a week if that rather than every day!) but everything in the pantry is primal. So she has no choice but to eat primal at home, out of the house is a different story but I am hoping over time she will learn that sugar/bread etc doesn't make her feel good and she will make better choices. I have tried to make the transition easier for her by baking primal banana bread, coconut pancakes/waffles etc and I do have gluten free bread in the freezer for the times she is absolutely desperate for bread. Her favourite thing pre-primal was nutella sandwiches, so I made nutella for her (the ingredients are all actually primal, but its still not really an every day food) and she has that on the banana bread or uses it to dip fruit in and it satisfies her craving. My top tip to success would be be organised and plan ahead - on the weekend I make things like coconut pancakes/waffles, banana bread muffins, muffin sized frittatas and they all get packaged individually and frozen, I also freeze leftover smoothie in icepop moulds and I cut up heaps of carrots sticks and pop those in the fridge. So she can quickly grab something for breakfast and lunch on those rushed mornings and when she gets home from school starving there are plenty of choices for her. She is on day 17 of being totally primal at home and while there have been occasional tantrums in the beginning she has done really well at accepting the change, she still misses bread but she has done so much better than her father!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Edenmb View Post
              Has anyone worked on changing their children's diets and dealing with issues of them not wanting to change, and school lunches (she does not want things we can provide without bread, and my husband does not want the difficulty) and friend's houss? How much of a say should she have? What do I say to her so she understands how importnt this is for her health?

              Any advice would be appreciated.
              None of the kids willingly gave up bread in our house. (at the supermarket: "daddy, can we please buy a loaf of bread? please? just one loaf of bread?")

              The rule we've fallen into is that we control all of the food in our house, but we don't make a big deal of what they eat away from home. So if we're at a shared lunch or something, they can eat whatever junk food they want. Because really, what we want is for them to learn to listen to their bodies, and letting them eat things which make them feel bad can help them to make a better connection to their bodies.

              My wife has our 8yo girl on a gluten/dairy/nightshade elimination diet at the moment (and my daughter REALLY misses cream, particularly when we have something like banana splits and she has to have coconut cream instead).

              At the end of the day, it's her body and you and her both have to accept that ultimately she is the person who controls what goes in her body. Your home doesn't need to be an 'enabler' though
              Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

              Griff's cholesterol primer
              5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
              Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
              TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
              bloodorchid is always right

              Comment


              • #8
                keep buying the gluten free bread until she's old enough to understand that she's still sick. Grace & I really like Glutino. I'm kind of with Damiana on this one though. YOU buy the groceries. Therefore, YOU control the food she eats.
                --Trish (Bork)
                TROPICAL TRADITIONS REFERRAL # 7625207
                http://pregnantdiabetic.blogspot.com
                FOOD PORN BLOG! http://theprimaljunkfoodie.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  Wish my parents would've helped me make better choices, I was obese by the age of 14! I had to figure it all out on my own. Sorry I can't help out too much, but it's my understanding that white rice and oats are the least offensive grains. I still think grains are not real food though. Good luck to you!
                  Paleo since November 2011 - Carnivore since June 2012
                  Before and after pics
                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread65846.html
                  Primal Sucess Story
                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread65400.html
                  Primal Journal
                  http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum...tml#post955444

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                  • #10
                    Show her the movie 'Fathead'. It has a very good explanation of how sugars and starches work in our bodies, readily accessible for kids. Watch it several times. All three of my kids had their attitudes really changed by it. (Me, too!) It is not about gluten, per se, but it really starts the thinking about how things work inside our bodies, and gets you thinking about viewing things critically. You could also have her read some posts from his blog. ots of good stuff there, presented in an easy to understand 9and funny) format.

                    You are in charge, but unless she understands what is going on, she will be no more than a grudging participant, who will break free as soon as the opportunity arises. That said, if it is not in the house, she won't be eating it regularly, and might notice the ill effects when she does more dramatically. Keep plenty of the good stuff that she does enjoy on hand, though. Make it easy for her to find food she likes and don't give her a reason to feel like there's nothing good to eat.

                    You could have her do a science experiment on herself, strict compliance vs. NOT. Offer a reward of something that really motivates her for trying it and analyzing her experience.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I got my wake up call when my daughter 4 yo consumed 4 bananas in a space of an hour and refused all other food. From there on, there was no bread or cheerios in the house, and we endured a battle of wills. I cook and pack every piece of food she takes to day care & school, allow two small candies or something like that a day, and she has organic rice-only cereal as a concession.

                      The downside is that she is a meatzza fiend now, and squasheroni and cheese is her dream supper... but she is willingly trying other fare, and likes some, rejects others. I try to explain concepts in simple terms, like 'you can't have just fruit honey, because your energy will run out too fast. You need to have it with PB or yogurt'. I have no quarrel with PB, Greek yogurt and natural hot dogs. May not be the bestest choices, but beat bread and pasta any day. We also looked through DK Eyewitness books about how ancient men ate. Used the Ice Age as an introduction to Vegetarian vs Meat-eater (Dinasaur) and I have the Apple Food Choices sheet on the fridge. And, yes, I had to use the:" Because it is our house. Because that's how we eat" clauses too.

                      Right or wrong, but 2 years down the road my kid seems healthy and muscular, has a great sunny disposition, and never refuses to pitch into any activity. I hope she stays that way.
                      My Journal: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread57916.html
                      When I let go of what I am, I become what I might be.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I can't quite say I've been completely successful yet with my 5yo, and I think younger kids might be easier than older kids, who have more opinions and ideas about their life.

                        My 5yo understands nothing more than that we are "eating healthy" because Pappa never ate healthy, and that why he has a big belly, and the big belly is going to make Pappa really sick. From when he was young I always just fed him what we ate, and while we were pretty CW, I did read about WAP when he was young, so we were a bit healthier than regular SAD, so I think that made the transition about easier.

                        My strategy is to increase the primal foods which he already likes, slowly cutting back on the non-primal foods, and slowly adding in new nutrient-dense foods. He always liked broccoli, orange vegetables, meat, cheese sticks, and salami. So I increased those foods - he takes cooked broccoli to school for lunch, he has orange vegetables for dinner, cheese sticks and Applegate farms salami as snacks. He still eats sprouted bread, Ezekiels 7-grain one, a lot of their other types has soy in it, and while sprouted soy down at the bottom of the ingredient list, he is a 5yo boy, so I avoid those. He used to love Nutella, but then we switched to peanut butter, then Smucker's Naturals, then Smucker's Organic, then Almond butter - he hasn't complained about the change. When I make popcorn now it's only about once a week, and I cook it on the stove with coconut oil and then drizzle a bunch of butter over it (I'm also ordering heirloom popcorn kernels through our co-op). We usually cook him bacon and eggs in the morning and have breakfast together. He wasn't a huge fan of eggs at first, and after his first bite of bacon he declared he didn't like it. But we just kept on serving it to him, and when he sat down to dinner last night (beef roast and carrots) he exclaimed "hey, where's my bacon!?" I put some small pieces of avocado on his taco salad the other night and he ate it without comment. So, progress, slowly.

                        In my experience kids are big fans of tender meats. Their baby molars have a hard time with anything tough or chewy, which is why they like hot dogs and chicken nuggets so much, the meat has already been broken up. I think cave people pre-chewed their kid's meat, but I'd rather use a food processor. I watch my kid eat dinner, and even when we were doing a standard 3-section plate he would always eat the meat first, the veggies second, and leave the potatoes/pasta. I always just shrugged when he did this, and now he is a happy little clam not having that stuff on his dinner plate. Baked sweet potatoes and sweet potatoes fries are his favorite "orange" options, so for kids who like carbs maybe you can add in a variety of different carbs and see if something takes. Who knows, some kids might fall in love with turnips, rutabaga, beets, or brussel sprouts. If they don't know they aren't "supposed" to like it, they might make it their new favorite food. If the plate is full of foods they like they won't really think of different options.

                        That being said, my kid isn't an angel. I took him with me to the grocery store the other day and he kept on running down the center aisles asking for chips, cookies, and donuts. I said no, no, no like a metronome. He also talks about McDonald's and Burger King a lot, especially the french fries. So if he is left to his own devices he'll stuff his face with junk. But at 5 years old he isn't expected to make wise decisions for himself. I'm leaving him at home when I go grocery shopping, and when I get home and he asks "Mommy, did you forget to buy Cheerios again?" I just say yes.

                        I also don't stress about him eating "birthday treats" at school. When I meet with his teacher I'll explain that we are keeping him very low sugar/grain for health reasons (we unexpectedly found that cutting out sugars and grains cured him of his nearly-chronic nosebleeds - seriously, he even got blood tests for leukemia and I got a reference for a doctor to cauterize the vein, but since cutting out sugar and all grains excepted sprouted there hasn't been a drip of blood). I'm not really feeling the need to send along an "alternative" for him to eat, but I just want to make sure he is eating only a small amount.

                        With the food commercials on kids TV these days it can be tough to make good choices for kids without them feeling "deprived." But honestly, even though 5yo asks for Trix yogurt because he likes the commercial for it, he doesn't actually like it very much. So for an older kid a conversation about advertising and making good choices for oneself might be a good idea.

                        These are just my ideas, but every kid is different, so you'll have to find out what works best for your family.

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                        • #13
                          I go by the philosophy that they can't eat it if it's not in the house, so I almost never buy non-primal food. The almost comes in as we have parties for teenagers often in the summer (pool at our house) so we will occasionally buy buns, hot dogs or chips. My son loves hot dogs in a bun (4 yo) better than chips or candy. This stuff is not often here and pizza in a birthday food (if the birthday person chooses it (so a couple of times a year). Other than that, it's not here. What he eats at play dates and snack at school are what they are. Luckily, we have no alergies (that we know of), so I don't worry about the occasional treat. I pack the types of primal food he likes (meat roll ups, apple w/ almond butter, yogurt, cheese, water, banana) and work on getting him to eat veges at home. Just do your best - there are lots of resources out there to help. Kids can be tough. Remember, even half assed primal with almost no processed food is way better than CW and SAD!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SarahW View Post
                            In my experience kids are big fans of tender meats. Their baby molars have a hard time with anything tough or chewy, which is why they like hot dogs and chicken nuggets so much, the meat has already been broken up. I think cave people pre-chewed their kid's meat, but I'd rather use a food processor.
                            This is absolutely true for us. We found that the best and tenderest meat was by using the slow cooker (on things like stewing steak). Just divine.
                            Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                            Griff's cholesterol primer
                            5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                            Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                            TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                            bloodorchid is always right

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Try this easy alternative to bread (thanks to forum member Rivvin):

                              c almond meal
                              2 T coconut oil or butter (I use 1 T; coconut oil works best)
                              1 t baking powder
                              1 egg

                              Mix all together. I pour this evenly into four custard-type Pyrex glass bowls (the 10-oz size). It's a very thin layer. Microwave for 60-90 seconds.

                              It comes out similar in size, thickness, and consistency to those "100 calorie thin buns". Some people say it tastes eggy to them, but it didn't to me. I refrigerate the extra and it keeps well for a day or two.

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