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A Treatise on Strength

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  • A Treatise on Strength

    Hi Guys.

    I have recently completed a 4 part blog series called, "A Treatise on Strength". Essentially the idea was to put down in writing a outline of the factors that create a balanced, strong, person. The idea is backed with a primal mindset.

    Help a brother out, take a look at it, and leave me some feedback. You can leave feedback here or on the blog itself.

    My next major post will be on the potential for enlightenment through powerlifting


    A Treatise on Strength


    Thanks!
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  • #2
    I will definitely read it later but as a stimulus for your next post you could think about how many ancient philosophers had an athletic background. Socrates, for example, was a soldier.
    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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    • #3
      You write very well. That is coming from an English professor, BTW. And I agree with your conclusions. Strength is something that has become undervalued in our current society.

      For some reason Part 2 doesn't load. 1, 3, and 4 do. You might want to check on that.

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      • #4
        @Paleobird, thank you, that means a lot. I try to be concise and specific with my writing.

        @Alex good, I have thought about that, but I may have to dig a bit deeper.

        All the links are fixed. The feedback really helps

        Grok on
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        • #5
          PB, you can read Part 2 here: A treatise on physical strength. The link he has at the bottom of his first post doesn't work, but you can get to it via his blog home page.

          Josh, I really liked these. I especially like how you summed it up: "Strength is the mental and physical fortitude to endure, resilience to bounce back, and force to create change, allowing you to thrive in any circumstance and through any adversity."

          That has been part of my personal philosophy, but I've never defined it so precisely. Well done!

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          • #6
            Ha-ha. This thread is for Dado. RIP, Dado.
            Crohn's, doing SCD

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            • #7
              Actually Paleobird, how would you feel about doing a little testimonial for my writing?
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              • #8
                Originally posted by TrPAssasin View Post
                Actually Paleobird, how would you feel about doing a little testimonial for my writing?
                Would the word of one retired English professor really be a testimonial?

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                • #9
                  Well, I am assuming your grasp of the English language is a good one, and as an English professor, people will hold your views on writing in high regard. So, yes
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                  • #10
                    But she's an american professor... She can't spell colour!
                    In all of the universe there is only one person with your exact charateristics. Just like there is only one person with everybody else's characteristics. Effectively, your uniqueness makes you pretty average.

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                    • #11
                      Colour....Colour....OH you mean COLOR, that's my FAVORITE!
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TrPAssasin View Post
                        All the links are fixed. The feedback really helps
                        Thanks for writing this. It is clear and well written, and I am going to try and be more mindful of the precepts it contains.

                        I do have a couple of minor gribbles. The green hyperlinks are annoying. The Page 2 link on the introduction still seems to be broken. And the page nagivation could be much more streamlined and web savvy. Ideally, you would have the following at the footer of each of the four pages:

                        A Treatise on Strength: Prev 1 2 3 4 Next
                        Where you change the 'Prev' and 'Next' links on each page, and turn the url for the current page into a bold tag instead.
                        Last edited by magicmerl; 09-09-2012, 04:28 PM.
                        Disclaimer: I eat 'meat and vegetables' ala Primal, although I don't agree with the carb curve. I like Perfect Health Diet and WAPF Lactofermentation a lot.

                        Griff's cholesterol primer
                        5,000 Cal Fat <> 5,000 Cal Carbs
                        Winterbike: What I eat every day is what other people eat to treat themselves.
                        TQP: I find for me that nutrition is much more important than what I do in the gym.
                        bloodorchid is always right

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                        • #13
                          @Magicmerl, thanks for the feedback. I'm, totally, with you on the infolinks, but if they bring in a couple bucks the blog pays for itself. I use Firefox and they don't even show up on my browser.

                          As for the footer, I have implemented your idea. Thanks for that.
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                          • #14
                            I really enjoyed reading this (part 3 was my favorite part)

                            I've often though about how Survial of the Fittest doesn't seem to apply to humanity anymore (at least in the industrialized First World). Babies born prematurely years ago would have died, but today it's a normal occurance...diseases and infections that would have wiped out the sickly are now treated with medecines, and those people keep living, which in my opinion has led to weaker and weaker genes.

                            I, myself would have died from a variety of childhood illnesses I contracted, if I'd been born 100 years ago. Of course, no one would prefer a loved on to die for the sake of improving the gene pool, that's ridiculous, but I do wonder about the cumulative affect this has on us as a species.

                            In part 4, you mentioned that children routinely worked 14 hour days in mines and mills, which they not only survived, but led to them thriving, making them stronger, but most of those children likely developed some pretty serious health consequences as a result of that (black lung is the first that comes to mind). Did I misinterpret the point you were making?

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                            • #15
                              @BestBetter, I'm glad you enjoyed it!

                              As far as the 14 hour days, a bunch of them probably did die, but the mill workers wouldn't have caught black lung. Also, a whole generation of early industrial revolution children didn't just die off and those industries still flourished. The point I was making is that we, as a species, can survive and even thrive through many situations. And, we have.
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