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  • Omg been on the most amazing mountain bike ride in rotorua, rode like 50 Km in total

    Resurge: also there was a topic on Campbell live about low sugar diet

    Wellington mum: I also live in wellington and would support you if we found more people to do a primal fitness group

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    • Originally posted by reserge View Post
      Are you Kiwi lasses planning on tuning in to 3Degrees tonight at 8.30? They are talking about eating/losing weight eating fat. A girl I follow on FB is featuring.
      Don't have telly but would be interested in your feedback if you watch it.
      Annie Ups the Ante
      http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

      Comment


      • As a newbie in the Honeymoon Phase of Primal eating I enjoyed the article and felt it put "eating saturated fat" in a good light.

        It was largely about SF and had "experts" weighing in on the effect that eating them has on our heart health.

        It didn't go into the "bad side" of carbs, and it only touched very briefly on the increases in health problems brought about by the current dietary "ideal" of high carbs-low fat.

        It featured Jim Mann (Professor of Human Nutrition at Otago Uni) who my mother was slagging off just this weekend. Mum used to be a diabetes educator (is a registered nurse) and she is very scathing of the diets Jim recommends diabetes patients - ie. low fat-high carb. Mum is a high fat-low carb fanatic and has much success putting patients on that sort of regime.

        Interestingly I have been reading numerous articles where Jim Mann talks of a "looming diabetes epidemic". No mention of that from him tonight...
        "To keep the body in good health is a duty...otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear" - Buddha.

        103.4kg - SW 10 March 14
        102.3kg - Primal SW 14 March 14
        101.2kg - CW
        65kg - Goal Weight

        10 Year Wedding Anniversary 11 December 2014. Bring on the hot wife .

        Comment


        • The program also had a part on paleo and had a good argument against some guy saying " well cavemen only lived to 40. " and silly stuff like that but really good for showing the affects of mainstream health and diets which in my opinion, many paleo/primal followers disagree

          3rd degree: paleo and saturated fat
          http://www.3news.co.nz/Saturated-fat...7/Default.aspx

          Campbell live: low sugar (about half way into the couples baby episode)
          http://www.3news.co.nz/Video/CampbellLive.aspx

          These are both really worth watching

          Comment


          • Originally posted by reserge View Post
            As a newbie in the Honeymoon Phase of Primal eating I enjoyed the article and felt it put "eating saturated fat" in a good light.

            It was largely about SF and had "experts" weighing in on the effect that eating them has on our heart health.

            It didn't go into the "bad side" of carbs, and it only touched very briefly on the increases in health problems brought about by the current dietary "ideal" of high carbs-low fat.

            It featured Jim Mann (Professor of Human Nutrition at Otago Uni) who my mother was slagging off just this weekend. Mum used to be a diabetes educator (is a registered nurse) and she is very scathing of the diets Jim recommends diabetes patients - ie. low fat-high carb. Mum is a high fat-low carb fanatic and has much success putting patients on that sort of regime.

            Interestingly I have been reading numerous articles where Jim Mann talks of a "looming diabetes epidemic". No mention of that from him tonight...
            Lol I'm just like your mum reserge, I sort of get angry since it is so unnatural to eat lots of carbs and so little fat but I love the Uni students making a joke about saturated fat, in particular butter

            Comment


            • Thanks Reserge for the plot summary
              Annie Ups the Ante
              http://www.marksdailyapple.com/forum/thread117711.html

              Comment


              • Here you go Annie, you can watch it online now.

                http://www.tv3.co.nz/3RD-DEGREE-Wedn...4/Default.aspx
                If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

                Originally posted by tfarny
                If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

                Comment


                • Omg I have stumbled across the most amazing thing. At Moore wilsons (a good bulk supermarket with lots of variety and good food) they sell 500g bags of berry crumbs (which are like off cuts of berrys) for only $2. Like mind explosion. I had it on top of chopped up seasonal fruit with lots of whipped cream mixed through it. Moore Wilsons are amazing though they sell stuff directed at restraints in bulk so we buy 2L bottles of cream and 1kg packets of freedom farms shoulder bacon for the same kind of price as 1kg of any other non free range bacon. MIND EXPLOSION.

                  Comment


                  • the only thing i can say is low fat high carb working or not must depend on the carbs and the fats and the other underlying issues. i think everything is often very broad brushed for the masses. i do know if i low carb high fat, i do ok for a while. then i start to get stressed and / or fat, which makes me even more stressed LOL no grains, no PUFAs here. just fruit and tubers and saturated fat. we dont have moore wilsons down here. altho OMG i saw someone in front of me buying venison mince with a big saver sticker on it. $10.99 for 500g!!!! i nearly fainted trying to act natural. it was farmed venison too so they may as well have got beef as it is so bland.

                    Comment


                    • anzac day. we're off to the local service in the rain soon. my youngest is laying a wreath for her school. i've got the skinny black jeans and long black boots on and am looking for a decent black jacket that doesnt make me look like a high class madam. the ancestors would be amused lol i always take the kids as i think it is important we remember. all our first world problems really pale into insignificance. we were also partially on the wrong side. blown into oblivion in the largest tank battle in WW2. refugees across eastern europe shot at by fighter planes from the winning side. the other part of the whanau got mustard gassed, survived battles hardly anyone else did, my great uncle even accidentally did the potato hack in a POW camp. he put on weight. so many nasty, ugly things happened in the name of someone winning. so yeah. i am not sure the kids even get the significance but i am sure one day they will. and, first world issue, i have worked out how to make decent GF anzac cookies!!!

                      Comment


                      • Ooh, I'll take that recipe when you get a mo Seas
                        If you're interested in my (very) occasional updates on how I'm working out and what I'm eating click here.

                        Originally posted by tfarny
                        If you are new to the PB - please ignore ALL of this stuff, until you've read the book, or at least http://www.marksdailyapple.com/primal-blueprint-101/

                        Comment


                        • Gluten Free Anzac Biscuits | Gluten Free Julia

                          obviously use butter not margarine. i used GF cornflakes and for the 1.5 cups of GF flours i think i used a mix of rice and tapioca but there could have also been a bit of organic corn meal in there too. cant remember. the trick is to cook them enough to crisp them up as well. if not. recook.

                          it rained and was freezing. then we had a rainbow appear as they did the last post which was very cool. ended up discussing auschwitz with a really old lady who had visited when she went to europe. we are part jewish too from the german ancestors. she was telling the kids about the war cemetries there. i have been to a few many years ago and they are spooky. rows and rows of white crosses and numbers.

                          Comment


                          • Hope all of my southern friends had a good holiday.

                            Comment


                            • I have been to a war cemetery, too. One of the American cemeteries there in the Benelux. It struck me speechless - I had never seen such a thing IRL until then. I have also been to Buchenwald (concentration camp)- it is located outside the city of Weimar. Until then, I had no idea the Nazis had also had a hatred of gays, the disabled, Gypsies/Roma (my German Oma is still alive at 92 and still calls them gypsies), committed Christians who spoke against them, and about ten other groups, all of whom were assigned their very own color-coded stars and triangles.

                              Now that I have a special-needs daughter of my own, a while ago it struck me how you see folks of various handicaps on the street/in public everyday here in the US, but not in Germany; and why my German relatives ask such seemingly odd questions of me that almost smack of "do you take her in public?", and are amazed that she leads a full public life, altho watched over and schedule-modified so we hit the quiet times (is better for her that way as she thinks and reacts slowly).

                              Both trips were completely worth it, even though I needed a stiff few glasses of wine to end the day afterwards. Now off I go to research Anzac Day.
                              I have a mantra that I have spouted for years... "If I eat right, I feel right. If I feel right, I exercise right. If I exercise right, I think right. If I think right, I eat right..." Phil-SC

                              Comment


                              • HI GUYS - Gwamma is back !!!!!!!!
                                and I found this little gem - thought that I would share......................


                                GO KIWI!!!!

                                10 Silly Things Kiwis Say

                                Every country has its slang, those silly little words and phrases that make absolutely no sense to outsiders, and New Zealand is no exception. Here is a list of ten of those silly words and phrases that Kiwis say, of which I had to hastily make sense when we emigrated from England, and which you might find useful if you’re planning a holiday in New Zealand:


                                1) Sweet as
                                Kiwis have a disconcerting habit of not finishing similes. Though ‘sweet as’ is the most common, practically any adjective can be placed before the ‘as’, such as ‘dark as’, as in, ‘It’s dark as in here’, which means ‘It’s really dark in here’. When I first moved to New Zealand, it was hard to get used to saying something like ‘I’m just going to the toilet’ and hearing ‘Sweet as’ in response – I mean sweet as what, for goodness’ sake? The act of going to the toilet is hardly sweet! The problem is that ‘sweet as’ can mean many things, from a simple ‘okay’ to ‘really awesome’, as in ‘This beach is sweet as’. ‘Sweet as’ is often used interchangeably with ‘awesome’ – ‘I got some milk.’ / ‘Awesome, put it in the fridge.’ I should add that Kiwis tend to use the word ‘awesome’ to describe things that are in actual fact quite unremarkable.

                                2) Choice
                                Another word Kiwis use interchangeably with ‘awesome’ is ‘choice’ – ‘I’m going to the beach.’ / ‘Choice.’ – ‘New Zealand is a choice place to live.’ After a certain amount of confusion as to why and how a word that means ‘decision’ can come to be used in the place of ‘awesome’, I realised that you can also have ‘choice’ cuts of meat – ‘choice’ as in ‘the best’, or, perhaps, ‘the ones that would be chosen first’ or ‘a good choice’. Maybe if you say ‘I’m going to the beach’ and a Kiwi replies ‘Choice’, what they mean is ‘That’s a great choice for you to have made’. Another word that Kiwis sometimes use in the place of ‘choice’ is ‘chur’, but not when it’s an adjective – you couldn’t say ‘New Zealand is a chur place to live’; that makes no sense, but ‘chur’ can be used appreciatively, as in ‘That’s awesome’. ‘Chur’ can also be used as an informal ‘thank you’, which means it might derive from the word ‘cheers’.

                                3) Not even
                                ‘Not even’ means ‘no’, but not a simple ‘no’, more an indignant emphasis of how untrue something is. ‘You like Justin Bieber.’ / ‘Not even.’ Maybe it comes from ‘not even that’ – Kiwis tend to shorten everything. For example, ‘afternoon’ becomes ‘arvo’, ‘cousin’ become ‘cuz’, and ‘brother’ becomes ‘bro’. It should be noted that Kiwis, especially young male Kiwis, call every male they come into contact with ‘bro’ regardless of whether or not they are brothers or even, in fact, related.

                                4) Ow
                                The word – well it’s more of a noise than a word – ‘ow’ doesn’t really mean anything. It certainly doesn’t mean ‘I’m in pain’. It’s just a sound that Kiwis – Maoris in particular – add to the end of random sentences. ‘Where are you going, ow?’ ‘Chuck me a beer, ow.’ ‘Not even, ow.’ It’s just for emphasis. When I first moved to New Zealand, everyone said ‘oy’ instead – ‘What’s up, oy?’ – but ‘ow’ seems to have replaced it.

                                5) Yeah-nah
                                What a pointless contradiction! ‘Is it raining out there?’ / ‘Yeah-nah.’ ‘Do you want a drink?’ / ‘Oh, yeah-nah, not really, eh.’ Kiwis aren’t very decisive people. ‘Yeah-nah’ seems to mean ‘kind of’. You say it when you agree with someone, but also don’t, or if you get what someone’s saying, but don’t agree. ‘Yeah-nah’ means ‘no’, but perhaps in a way that you don’t want to offend people. It also means ‘yes’.
                                Picture
                                6) Good on ya, mate
                                The phrase ‘Good on ya, mate’ was popularised by a series of commercials for the New Zealand beer Speight’s. It means ‘well done’ or ‘I approve’. The word ‘mate’ is like ‘bro’ in that it is used mostly by males to describe other males even if they’ve never met them before, except ‘mate’ is more used by white guys. ‘Good on ya’ can be shortened to ‘on ya’, as in ‘I won the race.’ / ‘On ya, Kevin.’

                                7) Bring a plate
                                ‘Bring a plate’ is an instruction that has tripped up many a new immigrant to New Zealand, including my mum. If you get invited to a party and the host tells you to ‘Bring a plate’, they don’t mean ‘We don’t have enough plates for so many people, so bring one of your own’, they mean ‘Bring a portion of food for everyone to share, such as a bowl of potato salad, or a cake, or, if you’re lazy, a packet of corn chips and dip’. You don’t want to see the look on the host’s face when you show up with an empty plate expecting them to put food on it for you.

                                8) Lollies
                                Being an English person, a Kiwi word that personally annoys me is ‘lollies’. In England, ‘lolly’ is a short form of ‘lollipop’, but in New Zealand ‘lollies’ means ‘all sweets in general’. (If you’re American, ‘sweets’ is the English word for ‘candy’.)

                                9) Dairy
                                If you’re not from New Zealand, if you hear the word ‘dairy’ you probably think of ‘milk products’ or ‘a farm with cows on it’. In New Zealand, as well as being those things, ‘dairy’ means ‘convenience store’. When I once told my English friends that I was ‘popping down the road to the dairy to get some milk’, they looked at me very strangely and thought that if you need milk in New Zealand you walk down the road and get it directly from a farm, probably milking the cow yourself. No. A ‘dairy’ is a miniature (and very expensive) supermarket, usually in a residential area.

                                10) She’ll be ’right
                                The saying ‘she’ll be ’right’ neatly sums up the entire Kiwi attitude to life. It means ‘don’t worry, the chances of something bad happening aren’t that high, and even if something bad does happen, it’s nothing we can’t handle; it’ll all turn out all right in the end’. It means ‘don’t stress’; ‘that’s good enough’ – ‘Reckon we’ve put enough mortar between those bricks?’ / ‘She’ll be ’right.’ Some criticise the complacency this phrase implies, but others embrace it as a healthy outlook. Kiwis don’t sweat about the little things and lead generally happier lives for it.
                                "never let the truth get in the way of a good story "

                                ...small steps....

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